A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
AFFANATO [aka AFFANOSO]
[adjective & verb]
Music: anguished; in a distressed or anxious manner, breathless, panting, agitated, sad, mournful.
Etymology: Italian.
[Michael Putz Richard]

AFFANATO [aka AFFANOSO]

[adjective & verb]

Music: anguished; in a distressed or anxious manner, breathless, panting, agitated, sad, mournful.

Etymology: Italian.

[Michael Putz Richard]

ILLUMINANCE
[noun]
1. an act or instance of illuminating; to supply or brighten with light.
2. intellectual or spiritual enlightenment.
3. Photometry: the total luminous flux, i.e. the measure of the perceived power of light incident on a surface, per unit area.
Etymology: from Latin illuminatus, past participle of illūmināre, “to light up, brighten”.
[Amanda Sage]

ILLUMINANCE

[noun]

1. an act or instance of illuminating; to supply or brighten with light.

2. intellectual or spiritual enlightenment.

3. Photometry: the total luminous flux, i.e. the measure of the perceived power of light incident on a surface, per unit area.

Etymology: from Latin illuminatus, past participle of illūmināre, “to light up, brighten”.

[Amanda Sage]

KINCHIN
[noun]
Chiefly British slang: a child.
Etymology: from German Kindchen, diminutive of Kind, ”child”.
[John Singer Sargent]

KINCHIN

[noun]

Chiefly British slang: a child.

Etymology: from German Kindchen, diminutive of Kind, ”child”.

[John Singer Sargent]

AVETROL
[noun]
bastard; illegitimate child.
Etymology: perhaps from Old French avoistre, “adulterous man” or “bastard”, as in child born outside of wedlock.
[Ania Mitura]

AVETROL

[noun]

bastard; illegitimate child.

Etymology: perhaps from Old French avoistre, “adulterous man” or “bastard”, as in child born outside of wedlock.

[Ania Mitura]

TELLUS
[noun]
Latin: “earth”; goddess of the earth; protector of marriage, fertility and the dead; identified with Greek Gaia [Gaea]. She is also known as Terra Mater, “Mother Earth”.
[Alex Grey - Gaia]

TELLUS

[noun]

Latin: “earth”; goddess of the earth; protector of marriage, fertility and the dead; identified with Greek Gaia [Gaea]. She is also known as Terra Mater, “Mother Earth”.

[Alex Grey - Gaia]

TENUITY
[noun]
1. thinness of form; slender.
2. the quality or condition of being tenuous; lack of thickness, density, or substance.
Etymology: from Latin tenuitās, “thinness”.
[Twiggy photographed by Justin de Villeneuve]

TENUITY

[noun]

1. thinness of form; slender.

2. the quality or condition of being tenuous; lack of thickness, density, or substance.

Etymology: from Latin tenuitās, “thinness”.

[Twiggy photographed by Justin de Villeneuve]

CASCADA

[noun]

waterfall; a steep descent of water from a height; a cascade.

Etymology: Spanish, from Italian cascata, from cascare, “to fall”, based on Latin cāsus, “fallen”.

Tomás Sánchez][

JACKALOPE
[noun]
a mythical animal of North American folklore (a so-called “fearsome critter”) described as a jackrabbit with antelope horns or deer antlers and sometimes a pheasant’s tail (and often hind legs). The word “jackalope” is a portmanteau of “jackrabbit” and “antalope”, an archaic spelling of “antelope”. It is also known asLepus temperamentalus.
It is possible that the tales of jackalopes were inspired by sightings of rabbits infected with the Shope papilloma virus, which causes the growth of horn- and antler-like tumors in various places on the rabbit’s head and body.
[Caitlin Hackett]

JACKALOPE

[noun]

a mythical animal of North American folklore (a so-called “fearsome critter”) described as a jackrabbit with antelope horns or deer antlers and sometimes a pheasant’s tail (and often hind legs). The word “jackalope” is a portmanteau of “jackrabbit” and “antalope”, an archaic spelling of “antelope”. It is also known asLepus temperamentalus.

It is possible that the tales of jackalopes were inspired by sightings of rabbits infected with the Shope papilloma virus, which causes the growth of horn- and antler-like tumors in various places on the rabbit’s head and body.

[Caitlin Hackett]

TERRENE
[adjective]
earthly; of or like the earth.
Etymology: from Anglo-French terreine, terrin, Latin terrenus, ”of earth”, from terra, “earth”.
[Fred Fields]

TERRENE

[adjective]

earthly; of or like the earth.

Etymology: from Anglo-French terreine, terrin, Latin terrenus, ”of earth”, from terra, “earth”.

[Fred Fields]

The truth is, everyone likes to look down on someone. If your favorites are all avant-garde writers who throw in Sanskrit and German, you can look down on everyone. If your favorites are all Oprah Book Club books, you can at least look down on mystery readers. Mystery readers have sci-fi readers. Sci-fi can look down on fantasy. And yes, fantasy readers have their own snobbishness. I’ll bet this, though: in a hundred years, people will be writing a lot more dissertations on Harry Potter than on John Updike. Look, Charles Dickens wrote popular fiction. Shakespeare wrote popular fiction - until he wrote his sonnets, desperate to show the literati of his day that he was real artist. Edgar Allan Poe tied himself in knots because no one realized he was a genius. The core of the problem is how we want to define “literature”. The Latin root simply means “letters”. Those letters are either delivered - they connect with an audience - or they don’t. For some, that audience is a few thousand college professors and some critics. For others, its twenty million women desperate for romance in their lives. Those connections happen because the books successfully communicate something real about the human experience. Sure, there are trashy books that do really well, but that’s because there are trashy facets of humanity. What people value in their books - and thus what they count as literature - really tells you more about them than it does about the book.
Brent Weeks
SIMPATICO
[adjective]
1. congenial; likable; easy to get along with.
2. of like mind or temperament; compatible.
2. having attractive qualities; pleasing.
Etymology: from Italian simpatia, “sympathy”.
[Huebucket]

SIMPATICO

[adjective]

1. congenial; likable; easy to get along with.

2. of like mind or temperament; compatible.

2. having attractive qualities; pleasing.

Etymology: from Italian simpatia, “sympathy”.

[Huebucket]

FRIGUS
[noun]
1. cold, coldness, coolness, chilliness.
2. the cold of winter; winter; frost.
3. the coldness of death; death.
4. a chill, fever.
5. a cold shudder which is produced by fear a cold region, place, area or spot (figuratively).
6. inactivity, indolence, slowness (figuratively).
7. a cold reception, indifference; a chilly demeanour.
Etymology: Latin, from Proto-Indo-European*sriHgos-. Cognate with Ancient Greek ῥῖγος (rhigos).
[a-hour - The Queen]

FRIGUS

[noun]

1. cold, coldness, coolness, chilliness.

2. the cold of winter; winter; frost.

3. the coldness of death; death.

4. a chill, fever.

5. a cold shudder which is produced by fear a cold region, place, area or spot (figuratively).

6. inactivity, indolence, slowness (figuratively).

7. a cold reception, indifference; a chilly demeanour.

Etymology: Latin, from Proto-Indo-European*sriHgos-. Cognate with Ancient Greek ῥῖγος (rhigos).

[a-hour - The Queen]

UBEROUS

[adjective]

fruitful; copious; abundant; plentiful.

Etymology: Latin uber, “full, fruitful, fertile, abundant, plentiful, copious, productive”. Not to be confused with German über.

[Balthasar van der Ast]

DOLEFUL
[adjective]
sorrowful; mournful; melancholy; sadness; dreary.

Etymology: ultimately derived from Latin dolor, equivalent to dol(ēre), “to feel pain”.
[Bill Carman]

DOLEFUL

[adjective]

sorrowful; mournful; melancholy; sadness; dreary.

Etymology: ultimately derived from Latin dolor, equivalent to dol(ēre), “to feel pain”.

[Bill Carman]

EFFIGY
[noun]
1. a representation or image, especially sculptured, as on a monument.
2. a crude representation of someone disliked, used for purposes of ridicule.
Etymology: from Latin effigiēs, from effingere, “ to form, portray”, from fingere, ”to shape”.
[Angela Rizza - Crow Effigy]

EFFIGY

[noun]

1. a representation or image, especially sculptured, as on a monument.

2. a crude representation of someone disliked, used for purposes of ridicule.

Etymology: from Latin effigiēs, from effingere, “ to form, portray”, from fingere, ”to shape”.

[Angela Rizza - Crow Effigy]