A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
We don’t need a list of rights and wrongs, tables of dos and don’ts: we need books, time, and silence. Thou shalt not is soon forgotten, but Once upon a time lasts forever.
Philip Pullman
ANTHOMANIA
[noun]
an extravagant fondness for flowers; an extreme love for flowers.
Etymology: from Ancient Greek ánthos, “flower” +‎ -mania, “madness”.
[Jérémie Fleury - Little Ida’s Flowers]

ANTHOMANIA

[noun]

an extravagant fondness for flowers; an extreme love for flowers.

Etymology: from Ancient Greek ánthos, “flower” +‎ -mania, “madness”.

[Jérémie Fleury - Little Ida’s Flowers]

PHASM
[noun]
1. an apparition; a phantom; an appearance; ghost.
2. an extraordinary appearance (as of light).
Etymology: from Greek phasmat-, phasma, from phainein, “to show”.
[Tom Bagshaw - Severance]

PHASM

[noun]

1. an apparition; a phantom; an appearance; ghost.

2. an extraordinary appearance (as of light).

Etymology: from Greek phasmat-, phasma, from phainein, “to show”.

[Tom Bagshaw - Severance]

THANATOPSIS
[noun]
1. a meditation upon death; view of or reflection upon death.
2. a meditation on death, as in a poem or essay.
3. the contemplation of death.
Etymology: from Latin thanatos (death) + Greek opsis (a view).
 [Philippe de Champaigne - Vanitas]

THANATOPSIS

[noun]

1. a meditation upon death; view of or reflection upon death.

2. a meditation on death, as in a poem or essay.

3. the contemplation of death.

Etymology: from Latin thanatos (death) + Greek opsis (a view).

 [Philippe de Champaigne - Vanitas]

FRAMPOLD
[adjective]
1. peevish, touchy, quarrelsome; cross; vexatious; disagreeable; bad-tempered.
2. of a horse: fiery; spirited.
Etymology: origin uncertain, potentially from The Two Noble Kinsmen typically attributed to John Fletcher and William Shakespeare.
[Timothy Banks - Precious Pirate]

FRAMPOLD

[adjective]

1. peevish, touchy, quarrelsome; cross; vexatious; disagreeable; bad-tempered.

2. of a horse: fiery; spirited.

Etymology: origin uncertain, potentially from The Two Noble Kinsmen typically attributed to John Fletcher and William Shakespeare.

[Timothy Banks - Precious Pirate]

PLUVIA
[noun]
rain; condensed water falling from a cloud.
Etymology: Latin.
[Adrian Borda - Life Is A Dance In The Rain]

PLUVIA

[noun]

rain; condensed water falling from a cloud.

Etymology: Latin.

[Adrian Borda - Life Is A Dance In The Rain]

EPISTEMOPHOBIA
[noun]
the fear of knowledge.
Etymology: from Greek epistēmē, “knowledge, understanding” + phobia, “fear”.
[Lucas Cranach - The Fall of Man]

EPISTEMOPHOBIA

[noun]

the fear of knowledge.

Etymology: from Greek epistēmē, “knowledge, understanding” + phobia, “fear”.

[Lucas Cranach - The Fall of Man]

LACUNA
[noun]
1. a gap or missing part, as in a manuscript, series, or logical argument; hiatus; unfilled interval.
2. Anatomy: a cavity, space, or depression, especially in a bone, containing cartilage or bone cells.
3. Botany: an air space in the cellular tissue of plants.
Etymology: from Latin lacuna, “pool, cavity”, from lacus, “lake”.
[Mathiole - Incomplete]

LACUNA

[noun]

1. a gap or missing part, as in a manuscript, series, or logical argument; hiatus; unfilled interval.

2. Anatomy: a cavity, space, or depression, especially in a bone, containing cartilage or bone cells.

3. Botany: an air space in the cellular tissue of plants.

Etymology: from Latin lacuna, “pool, cavity”, from lacus, “lake”.

[Mathiole - Incomplete]

LUGUBRIOUS
[adjective]
mournful, dismal, or gloomy, especially in an affected, exaggerated, or unrelieved manner.
Etymology: Latin lūgubri(s), “mournful”, akin to lūgēre, “to mourn”.
[Heather Watts - Sadness]

LUGUBRIOUS

[adjective]

mournful, dismal, or gloomy, especially in an affected, exaggerated, or unrelieved manner.

Etymology: Latin lūgubri(s), “mournful”, akin to lūgēre, “to mourn”.

[Heather Watts - Sadness]

MUZYKA
[noun]
music; chime; note; vocal or instrumental sounds (or both) combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form, harmony, and expression of emotion.
Etymology: Russian музыка.
[Alexei Antonov]

MUZYKA

[noun]

music; chime; note; vocal or instrumental sounds (or both) combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form, harmony, and expression of emotion.

Etymology: Russian музыка.

[Alexei Antonov]

PHARMACOLOGY

[noun]

the branch of medicine and biology concerned with the study of drug action, where a drug can be broadly defined as any man-made, natural, or endogenous (within the body) molecule which exerts a biochemical and/or physiological effect on the cell, tissue, organ, or organism.

Etymology: from Greek φάρμακον, pharmakon, “poison” in classic Greek, “drug” in modern Greek; and -λογία, -logia, “study of”, “knowledge of”.

[Julia Yellow]

NEOMENIA
[noun]
1. the time of the new moon; the beginning of the month in the lunar calendar.
2. the festival of the new moon.
Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin, from Greek neomēnia, from ne- (new) + -mēnia (thought to be from mēnē, “moon, month” – origin uncertain).
[Siegfriend Zademack - Die Zwei]

NEOMENIA

[noun]

1. the time of the new moon; the beginning of the month in the lunar calendar.

2. the festival of the new moon.

Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin, from Greek neomēnia, from ne- (new) + -mēnia (thought to be from mēnē, “moon, month” – origin uncertain).

[Siegfriend Zademack - Die Zwei]

SEMPITERNAL
[adjective]
everlasting; eternal.
Etymology: late Middle English < Late Latin sempiternālis.
[Andrew Forrest - Octaves of Infinity]

SEMPITERNAL

[adjective]

everlasting; eternal.

Etymology: late Middle English < Late Latin sempiternālis.

[Andrew Forrest - Octaves of Infinity]

CANOROUS
[adjective]
melodious; musical; tuneful; sweet sounding.
Etymology: Latin canōrus.
[Mike Azevedo - Sing For Me, Little Bird]

CANOROUS

[adjective]

melodious; musical; tuneful; sweet sounding.

Etymology: Latin canōrus.

[Mike Azevedo - Sing For Me, Little Bird]