A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
SPERO
[verb]
1. to hope for; hope.
2. I hope.
3. I await.
4. I fear, am apprehensive.
5. I assume, suppose.
Etymology: Latin, from spes, “hope”.
[Cyril Rolando - The Hope]

SPERO

[verb]

1. to hope for; hope.

2. I hope.

3. I await.

4. I fear, am apprehensive.

5. I assume, suppose.

Etymology: Latin, from spes, “hope”.

[Cyril Rolando - The Hope]

EVIGHEDEN
[noun]
eternity; forever; never ending; infinite time; duration without beginning or end.
Etymology: Danish, from evig, “eternal” +‎ -hed, used to form abstract nouns from adjectives.
[Shannon Bonatakis]

EVIGHEDEN

[noun]

eternity; forever; never ending; infinite time; duration without beginning or end.

Etymology: Danish, from evig, “eternal” +‎ -hed, used to form abstract nouns from adjectives.

[Shannon Bonatakis]

VIAGGIARE
[verb]
to travel; to move from one place to another.
Etymology: Latin.
[Justin Gerard]

VIAGGIARE

[verb]

to travel; to move from one place to another.

Etymology: Latin.

[Justin Gerard]

VULNUS
[noun] 
wound; injury.
Etymology: Latin, related to vellere, “to pluck, tear”.
[Hugo Simberg - The Wounded Angel]

VULNUS

[noun]

wound; injury.

Etymology: Latin, related to vellere, “to pluck, tear”.

[Hugo Simberg - The Wounded Angel]

FRANGIBLE

[adjective]

easily broken; breakable; delicate; brittle.

Etymology: from Old French, ultimately from Latin frangere ”to break”.

[md-arts]

PYROPHILIAC
[noun]
1. one who has a sexual attractive or intense love of fire.
2. one who lives in fire or relies on the presence on fire.
Etymology: Greek pyro-, combining form of pŷr, ”fire” + philia, “love”.
[James Strehle - Fire Nymph]

PYROPHILIAC

[noun]

1. one who has a sexual attractive or intense love of fire.

2. one who lives in fire or relies on the presence on fire.

Etymology: Greek pyro-, combining form of pŷr, ”fire” + philia, “love”.

[James Strehle - Fire Nymph]

MANES
[noun]
1. Roman Religion: the deified spirits of the ancient Roman dead honoured with graveside sacrifices.
2. the souls of the dead; shades; ghosts.
3. the spirit or shade of a particular dead person.
Etymology: from Middle English < Latin mānēs (plural); akin to Latin mānis, mānus, “good”. Not to be confused with mane.
[ebineyland - Ghost Dance]

MANES

[noun]

1. Roman Religion: the deified spirits of the ancient Roman dead honoured with graveside sacrifices.

2. the souls of the dead; shades; ghosts.

3. the spirit or shade of a particular dead person.

Etymology: from Middle English < Latin mānēs (plural); akin to Latin mānis, mānus, “good”. Not to be confused with mane.

[ebineyland - Ghost Dance]

[Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell]
LUSUS
[noun]
freak; a deviation from the normal; any abnormal phenomenon or product or unusual object; anomaly; aberration.
Etymology: Neo Latin, from Latin lusus, “playing, sport”.
[Alexander Kintner]

LUSUS

[noun]

freak; a deviation from the normal; any abnormal phenomenon or product or unusual object; anomaly; aberration.

Etymology: Neo Latin, from Latin lusus, “playing, sport”.

[Alexander Kintner]

PENELOPISE [aka PENELOPIZE]
[verb]
1. to undo and redo to gain time; to stall.
2. to create work as an excuse to deter suitors.
Etymology: Greek, from Penelope, the wife of Odysseus, who remained faithful to him during his long absence at Troy (characters from one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer). From Penelopeia, probably related to pene, &#8220;thread on the bobbin, weaver&#8221;.
[John William Waterhouse - Penelope &amp; the Suitors]

PENELOPISE [aka PENELOPIZE]

[verb]

1. to undo and redo to gain time; to stall.

2. to create work as an excuse to deter suitors.

Etymology: Greek, from Penelope, the wife of Odysseus, who remained faithful to him during his long absence at Troy (characters from one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer). From Penelopeia, probably related to pene, “thread on the bobbin, weaver”.

[John William Waterhouse - Penelope & the Suitors]

TOMNODDY

[noun]

1. the puffin.

2. a fool or dunce.

Etymology: uncertain, presumed to be from Tom (short for Thomas) + noddy (probably short for obsolete noddypoll, alteration of hoddypoll, “fumbling inept person”).

[Photographers: heylormammy & shadow-and-flame-86sagereidceltes & nordford]

ROSACEOUS
[adjective]
1. of or belonging to the rose family.
2. resembling the flower of a rose.
3. of the colour rose; rose-coloured; rosy.
Etymology: from Latin rosāceus, &#8221;made of roses&#8221; &lt; rosa, &#8220;rose&#8221;.
[Christian Schloe]

ROSACEOUS

[adjective]

1. of or belonging to the rose family.

2. resembling the flower of a rose.

3. of the colour rose; rose-coloured; rosy.

Etymology: from Latin rosāceus, ”made of roses” < rosa, “rose”.

[Christian Schloe]

FORAMINATE
[verb]
1. to pierce; to penetrate into or run through (something), as a sharp, pointed dagger, object, or instrument does.
[adjective]
2. full of holes or foramina; perforated.
Etymology: from Late Latin forāminātus “bored, pierced”, equivalent to forāmin-.
[Bill Carman]

FORAMINATE

[verb]

1. to pierce; to penetrate into or run through (something), as a sharp, pointed dagger, object, or instrument does.

[adjective]

2. full of holes or foramina; perforated.

Etymology: from Late Latin forāminātus “bored, pierced”, equivalent to forāmin-.

[Bill Carman]

OVATION
[noun]
1. an enthusiastic public reception of a person, marked especially by loud and prolonged applause.
2. the act of expressing approval or admiration; commendation; laudation.
3. Roman History: the ceremonial entrance into Rome of a commander whose victories were of a lesser degree of importance than that for which a triumph was accorded.
Etymology: from Latin ovātiōn- (stem of ovātiō), “a rejoicing, shouting”, equivalent to ovāt(us), past participle of ovāre, “to rejoice”.
[Guan ZeJu]

OVATION

[noun]

1. an enthusiastic public reception of a person, marked especially by loud and prolonged applause.

2. the act of expressing approval or admiration; commendation; laudation.

3. Roman History: the ceremonial entrance into Rome of a commander whose victories were of a lesser degree of importance than that for which a triumph was accorded.

Etymology: from Latin ovātiōn- (stem of ovātiō), “a rejoicing, shouting”, equivalent to ovāt(us), past participle of ovāre, “to rejoice”.

[Guan ZeJu]

Literature adds to reality, it does not simply describe it. It enriches the necessary competencies that daily life requires and provides; and in this respect, it irrigates the deserts that our lives have already become.
C. S. Lewis