A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles

UNGEZÄHMT

[adjective]

wild; untamed; feral; unsubdued.

Etymology: German.

[Angela Rizza - Wilder Things]

WAFTURE
[noun]
1. the act of passing or causing to pass easily or gently through or as if through the air.
2. a sound or odour, faintly perceived.
3. the use of movements (especially of the hands) to communicate familiar or prearranged signals.
Etymology: back formation from late Middle English waughter, “armed escort vessel” < Dutch or Low German wachter, “watchman”.
[Kris Lewis - Rose Zephyr]

WAFTURE

[noun]

1. the act of passing or causing to pass easily or gently through or as if through the air.

2. a sound or odour, faintly perceived.

3. the use of movements (especially of the hands) to communicate familiar or prearranged signals.

Etymology: back formation from late Middle English waughter, “armed escort vessel” < Dutch or Low German wachter, “watchman”.

[Kris Lewis - Rose Zephyr]

You think your pain and your heartbreak are unprecedented in the history of the world, but then you read. It was books that taught me that the things that tormented me most were the very things that connected me with all the people who were alive, or who had ever been alive.
James Baldwin

BIOPHILIA

[noun]

a love of life and the living world; the affinity of human beings for other life forms.

Etymology: first used by Erich Fromm to describe a psychological orientation of being attracted to all that is alive and vital; from Greek bios, “life” + philia, “love”.

[Vladimir Stankovic]

IGNAVIA
[noun]
1. idleness; sloth; indolence; laziness; inactivity.
2. cowardice, worthlessness.
Etymology: Italian from ignāvia.
[Lee Price]

IGNAVIA

[noun]

1. idleness; sloth; indolence; laziness; inactivity.

2. cowardice, worthlessness.

Etymology: Italian from ignāvia.

[Lee Price]

CERVINE
[adjective]
1. resembling or relating to a deer
2. of a dark yellowish-brown colour.

Etymology: from Latin cervīnus, from cervus, “a deer”.
[Liiga Smilshkalne]

CERVINE

[adjective]

1. resembling or relating to a deer

2. of a dark yellowish-brown colour.

Etymology: from Latin cervīnus, from cervus, “a deer”.

[Liiga Smilshkalne]

DISSOLUTION
[noun]
1. the act or process of resolving or dissolving into parts or elements.
2. the resulting state.
3. the undoing or breaking of a bond, tie, union, partnership, etc.
4. the breaking up of an assembly or organisation; dismissal; dispersal.
5. Government: an order issued by the head of a state terminating a parliament and necessitating a new election.
Etymology: from Middle English dissolucioun &lt; Latin dissolūtiōn-, stem of dissolūtiō, from dis-, a Latin prefix meaning “apart,” “asunder,” “away,” “utterly,” or having a privative, negative, or reversing force + solution, from Latin solūtus, “free, unfettered”, from solver, “to release”.
[Peter Gric - Dissolution of Ego]

DISSOLUTION

[noun]

1. the act or process of resolving or dissolving into parts or elements.

2. the resulting state.

3. the undoing or breaking of a bond, tie, union, partnership, etc.

4. the breaking up of an assembly or organisation; dismissal; dispersal.

5. Government: an order issued by the head of a state terminating a parliament and necessitating a new election.

Etymology: from Middle English dissolucioun < Latin dissolūtiōn-, stem of dissolūtiō, from dis-, a Latin prefix meaning “apart,” “asunder,” “away,” “utterly,” or having a privative, negative, or reversing force + solution, from Latin solūtus, “free, unfettered”, from solver, “to release”.

[Peter Gric - Dissolution of Ego]

LACKADAISICAL
[adjective]
1. without interest, enthusiasm, vigour, or determination; listless; lethargic.
2. lazy; indolent.
Etymology: from earlier lackadaisy, extended form of lackaday, alteration of alack a day, similar to alas, used as an expression of regret, sorrow, dismay, or disapproval.
[Freeminds - Lazy Day]

LACKADAISICAL

[adjective]

1. without interest, enthusiasm, vigour, or determination; listless; lethargic.

2. lazy; indolent.

Etymology: from earlier lackadaisy, extended form of lackaday, alteration of alack a day, similar to alas, used as an expression of regret, sorrow, dismay, or disapproval.

[Freeminds - Lazy Day]

SALVIFIC
[adjective]
1. having the power to save or redeem; the ability to rescue.
2. leading to salvation.
Etymology: from Late Latin salvificus, from Latin salvus “safe”.
[Evelyn De Morgan - Save Our Souls]

SALVIFIC

[adjective]

1. having the power to save or redeem; the ability to rescue.

2. leading to salvation.

Etymology: from Late Latin salvificus, from Latin salvus “safe”.

[Evelyn De Morgan - Save Our Souls]

BOKEH

[noun]

Photography: the aesthetic quality of the blur produced in the out-of-focus parts of an image captured by a lens.

Etymology: from the Japanese word boke (暈け or ボケ), which means “blur” or “haze”, or boke-aji (ボケ味), the “blur quality”. Boke is also used in the sense of a mental haze or senility. The term bokashi (暈かし) is related, meaning intentional blurring or gradation. Content Source.

[Mario Goldack] [word requested by funkdracula]

OCHONE [aka OHONE]
[interjection]
Irish &amp; Scots: an expression of sorrow; used as an exclamation of regret or grief. Similar to “alas!”
Etymology: from Gaelic ochóin.
[Tom Bagshaw - Regrets]

OCHONE [aka OHONE]

[interjection]

Irish & Scots: an expression of sorrow; used as an exclamation of regret or grief. Similar to “alas!”

Etymology: from Gaelic ochóin.

[Tom Bagshaw - Regrets]

HALIEUTICS
[noun]
1. a treatise upon fish or the art of fishing; ichthyology.
2. the activity of fishing.
3. a work on fishing.
Etymology: Latin halieuticus - pertaining to fishing.
[yuumei]

HALIEUTICS

[noun]

1. a treatise upon fish or the art of fishing; ichthyology.

2. the activity of fishing.

3. a work on fishing.

EtymologyLatin halieuticus - pertaining to fishing.

[yuumei]

SANGUINARY
[adjective]
1. involving or causing much bloodshed; bloody.
2. ready or eager to shed blood; bloodthirsty.
3. composed of or marked with blood.
Etymology: from Latin sanguinārius, “bloody”, from sanguis, &#8220;blood&#8221;.
[Lauren K. Cannon - Carmilla]

SANGUINARY

[adjective]

1. involving or causing much bloodshed; bloody.

2. ready or eager to shed blood; bloodthirsty.

3. composed of or marked with blood.

Etymology: from Latin sanguinārius, “bloody”, from sanguis, “blood”.

[Lauren K. Cannon - Carmilla]

BOSQUE
[noun]
Spanish: forest; woods; grove.
Etymology: from Late Latin boscus, from Proto-Germanic *buskaz, “bush, thicket”.
[Cory Godbey]

BOSQUE

[noun]

Spanish: forest; woods; grove.

Etymology: from Late Latin boscus, from Proto-Germanic *buskaz, “bush, thicket”.

[Cory Godbey]

NATYURMORT
[noun]
still life; the category of graphic arts concerned with inanimate subject matter.
Etymology: Russian натюрморт.
[Alexei Antonov]

NATYURMORT

[noun]

still life; the category of graphic arts concerned with inanimate subject matter.

Etymology: Russian натюрморт.

[Alexei Antonov]