A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles

Sep 23

PITFALL
[noun]
1. a lightly covered and unnoticeable pit prepared as a trap for people or animals.
2. any trap or danger for the unwary.
3. a hidden or unsuspected danger or difficulty.
Etymology: from Middle English pittefalle, equivalent to pitte, Old English pytt < Latin puteus, “well, pit, shaft” + falle, from Old English fealle, “trap”.
[Tom Bagshaw - Pitfalls]

PITFALL

[noun]

1. a lightly covered and unnoticeable pit prepared as a trap for people or animals.

2. any trap or danger for the unwary.

3. a hidden or unsuspected danger or difficulty.

Etymology: from Middle English pittefalle, equivalent to pitte, Old English pytt < Latin puteus, “well, pit, shaft” + falle, from Old English fealle, “trap”.

[Tom Bagshaw - Pitfalls]

Sep 22

VENIA
[noun]
1. indulgence, kindness.
2. mercy, grace, favour.
Etymology: Latin.
[Edward Burne-Jones - Tree of Forgiveness]

VENIA

[noun]

1. indulgence, kindness.

2. mercy, grace, favour.

Etymology: Latin.

[Edward Burne-Jones - Tree of Forgiveness]

Another 10 Untranslatable Words - Listverse -

[reprise]

10 Words That Can't Be Translated To English - Listverse -

[reprise]

Sep 21

INCLEMENT
[adjective]
1. (of the weather, the elements, etc.) severe, rough, or harsh; stormy.
2. not kind or merciful.
Etymology: from Latin inclēmēns, “unmerciful, severe”, from in-, “not” + clementem, “mild, placid”.
[Cory Ench - Cyclone]

INCLEMENT

[adjective]

1. (of the weather, the elements, etc.) severe, rough, or harsh; stormy.

2. not kind or merciful.

Etymologyfrom Latin inclēmēns, “unmerciful, severe”, from in-, “not” + clementem, “mild, placid”.

[Cory Ench - Cyclone]

BIOLUMINESCENCE
[noun]
the production and emission of light by a living organism. 
Etymology: hybrid word originating from Greek bios for “living” and Latin lumen for “light”.
[Jason Courtney - Even in Snowman&#8217;s boyhood there were luminous green rabbits (Oryx &amp; Crake)]

BIOLUMINESCENCE

[noun]

the production and emission of light by a living organism.

Etymology: hybrid word originating from Greek bios for “living” and Latin lumen for “light”.

[Jason Courtney - Even in Snowman’s boyhood there were luminous green rabbits (Oryx & Crake)]

GLEDE
[noun]
1. burning coal; an ember.
2. cinder.
Etymology: from Old English glēd. Not to be confused with Glede the bird of prey.
[Talbot Hughes - Cinderella]

GLEDE

[noun]

1. burning coal; an ember.

2. cinder.

Etymology: from Old English glēd. Not to be confused with Glede the bird of prey.

[Talbot Hughes - Cinderella]

Sep 20

RAMUS
[noun]
branch; a part of a tree that grows out from the trunk or from a bough.
Etymology: from Latin rāmus.
[Zen and Chic]

RAMUS

[noun]

branch; a part of a tree that grows out from the trunk or from a bough.

Etymology: from Latin rāmus.

[Zen and Chic]

TINCT
[noun]
1. to tinge or tint, as with colour.
2. Obsolete: to imbue.
[adjective]
3. tinged; coloured; flavoured.
[noun]
4. tint; tinge; colouring.
Etymology: from Latin tinctus, from tingere, “to colour”.
[Julian Callos]

TINCT

[noun]

1. to tinge or tint, as with colour.

2. Obsolete: to imbue.

[adjective]

3. tinged; coloured; flavoured.

[noun]

4. tint; tinge; colouring.

Etymology: from Latin tinctus, from tingere, “to colour”.

[Julian Callos]

CORDOLIUM
[noun]
heartfelt grief; sorrow of the heart.
Etymology: from Latin cor, “heart” + dolor, “pain, sorrow”, dolere, “to ache”.
[Jean Osborne - Grief]

CORDOLIUM

[noun]

heartfelt grief; sorrow of the heart.

Etymology: from Latin cor, “heart” + dolor, “pain, sorrow”, dolere, “to ache”.

[Jean Osborne - Grief]

Sep 19

FRACTUS
[adjective]
1. broken, shattered, having been broken.
2. vanquished, defeated, having been defeated.
[noun]
3. a cloud species which consists of broken shreds of cloud, like scud. Associated with cumulus, and stratus genera.
Etymology: Latin frāctus, derived from frangō, “break, fragment”.
[Jorge Monreal]

FRACTUS

[adjective]

1. broken, shattered, having been broken.

2. vanquished, defeated, having been defeated.

[noun]

3. a cloud species which consists of broken shreds of cloud, like scud. Associated with cumulus, and stratus genera.

Etymology: Latin frāctus, derived from frangō, “break, fragment”.

[Jorge Monreal]

CALLIDEMON
[noun]
beautiful demon; beautiful spirit.
Etymology: from Greek calli, from kalós, “beautiful” + demon, from daímōn, “dispenser, god, protective spirit”. Not to be confused with calodemon though they are derived from the same root words.
[Eric Fortune - The Demon Haunted World]

CALLIDEMON

[noun]

beautiful demon; beautiful spirit.

Etymology: from Greek calli, from kalós, “beautiful” + demon, from daímōn, “dispenser, god, protective spirit”. Not to be confused with calodemon though they are derived from the same root words.

[Eric Fortune - The Demon Haunted World]

[video]

Sep 18

WAFTURE
[noun]
1. the act of passing or causing to pass easily or gently through or as if through the air.
2. a sound or odour, faintly perceived.
3. the use of movements (especially of the hands) to communicate familiar or prearranged signals.
Etymology: back formation from late Middle English waughter, “armed escort vessel” &lt; Dutch or Low German wachter, “watchman”.
[Kris Lewis - Rose Zephyr]

WAFTURE

[noun]

1. the act of passing or causing to pass easily or gently through or as if through the air.

2. a sound or odour, faintly perceived.

3. the use of movements (especially of the hands) to communicate familiar or prearranged signals.

Etymology: back formation from late Middle English waughter, “armed escort vessel” < Dutch or Low German wachter, “watchman”.

[Kris Lewis - Rose Zephyr]

“You think your pain and your heartbreak are unprecedented in the history of the world, but then you read. It was books that taught me that the things that tormented me most were the very things that connected me with all the people who were alive, or who had ever been alive.” — James Baldwin