A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles

Jul 26

FEY
[adjective]
1. a) having or displaying an otherworldly, magical, or fairylike aspect or quality; enchanting. b) having visionary power; clairvoyant; attuned to the supernatural. c) appearing touched or crazy, as if under a spell; slightly insane; whimsical; strange.
2. Scots: a) fated to die soon; doomed. b) full of the sense of approaching death; in a state of high spirits or unusual excitement, formerly believed to presage death.
Etymology: Middle English; Old English fǣge - doomed to die; Old Saxon fēgi, Old High German feigi, Old Norse feigr.
[Michel Ogier]

FEY

[adjective]

1. a) having or displaying an otherworldly, magical, or fairylike aspect or quality; enchanting. b) having visionary power; clairvoyant; attuned to the supernatural. c) appearing touched or crazy, as if under a spell; slightly insane; whimsical; strange.

2. Scots: a) fated to die soon; doomed. b) full of the sense of approaching death; in a state of high spirits or unusual excitement, formerly believed to presage death.

Etymology: Middle English; Old English fǣge - doomed to die; Old Saxon fēgi, Old High German feigi, Old Norse feigr.

[Michel Ogier]

LACTIFEROUS
[adjective]
1. producing, secreting, or conveying milk.
2. Botany: yielding latex.
Etymology: from Neo-Latin lactifer, “that bears milk”.
[Christian Schloe]

LACTIFEROUS

[adjective]

1. producing, secreting, or conveying milk.

2. Botany: yielding latex.

Etymology: from Neo-Latin lactifer, “that bears milk”.

[Christian Schloe]

[video]

Jul 25

TRANSGRESS
[verb]
1. to violate a law, command, moral code, etc.; offend; sin.
2. to pass over or go beyond (a limit, boundary, etc.
3. to go beyond the limits imposed by (a law, command, etc.); violate; infringe.
Etymology: from Latin trānsgressus, past participle of trānsgredī, “to step across”.
[submitted by Nikita Kaun - A Tribute to Breaking Bad]

TRANSGRESS

[verb]

1. to violate a law, command, moral code, etc.; offend; sin.

2. to pass over or go beyond (a limit, boundary, etc.

3. to go beyond the limits imposed by (a law, command, etc.); violate; infringe.

Etymology: from Latin trānsgressus, past participle of trānsgredī, “to step across”.

[submitted by Nikita Kaun - A Tribute to Breaking Bad]

ENTHEOGEN
[noun]
1. a psychoactive substance used in a religious, shamanic, or spiritual context. Historically, entheogens were mostly derived from plant sources and have been used in a variety of traditional religious contexts.
2. any substance, such as a plant or drug, taken to bring on a spiritual experience.
Etymology: “generating the divine within” - neologism coined in 1979 by a group of ethnobotanists and scholars of mythology. The term is derived from two words of ancient Greek, ἔνθεος (entheos) and γενέσθαι (genesthai). The adjective entheos translates to English as “full of the god, inspired, possessed”. The Greeks used it as a term of praise for poets and other artists. Genesthai means “to come into being”.
[Martin Wittfooth - Entheogen]

ENTHEOGEN

[noun]

1. a psychoactive substance used in a religious, shamanic, or spiritual context. Historically, entheogens were mostly derived from plant sources and have been used in a variety of traditional religious contexts.

2. any substance, such as a plant or drug, taken to bring on a spiritual experience.

Etymology: “generating the divine within” - neologism coined in 1979 by a group of ethnobotanists and scholars of mythology. The term is derived from two words of ancient Greek, ἔνθεος (entheos) and γενέσθαι (genesthai). The adjective entheos translates to English as “full of the god, inspired, possessed”. The Greeks used it as a term of praise for poets and other artists. Genesthai means “to come into being”.

[Martin Wittfooth - Entheogen]

FLENCH
[verb]
1. to strip the blubber or the skin from (a whale, seal, etc.).
2. to strip off (blubber or skin); to flay.
Etymology: from Danish flense; related to Dutch flensen.
[Gerard David - The Flaying of Sisamnes]

FLENCH

[verb]

1. to strip the blubber or the skin from (a whale, seal, etc.).

2. to strip off (blubber or skin); to flay.

Etymology: from Danish flense; related to Dutch flensen.

[Gerard David - The Flaying of Sisamnes]

REVANCHE
[noun]
1. revenge or retaliation; vengeance; favour done in return.
2. the political policy of regaining lost territory.
3. Sports: rematch.
Etymology: French, from Old French revancher, “to avenge”.
[Jasmine Becket-Griffith - Haunted Mansion: The Bride]

REVANCHE

[noun]

1. revenge or retaliation; vengeance; favour done in return.

2. the political policy of regaining lost territory.

3. Sports: rematch.

Etymology: French, from Old French revancher, “to avenge”.

[Jasmine Becket-Griffith - Haunted Mansion: The Bride]

TUTELARY
[adjective]
1. being or serving as a guardian or protector.
2. of or relating to a guardian or guardianship.
[noun]
3. one that serves as a guardian or protector; a tutelary person, deity, or saint.
Etymology: from Latin tūtēlārius, “guardian”.
[hoooook]

TUTELARY

[adjective]

1. being or serving as a guardian or protector.

2. of or relating to a guardian or guardianship.

[noun]

3. one that serves as a guardian or protector; a tutelary person, deity, or saint.

Etymology: from Latin tūtēlārius, “guardian”.

[hoooook]

Jul 24

DONCELLA
[noun]
1. maid, damsel.
2. abigail; a lady’s waiting maid.
Etymology: Spanish, “maid” from a Vulgar Latin *domnicella, cf. French demoiselle, based on Latin domina, “lady, mistress”.
[Tony Sandoval - la dama de sal]

DONCELLA

[noun]

1. maid, damsel.

2. abigail; a lady’s waiting maid.

Etymology: Spanish, “maid” from a Vulgar Latin *domnicella, cf. French demoiselle, based on Latin domina, “lady, mistress”.

[Tony Sandoval - la dama de sal]

LOVELY
[adjective]
1. charmingly or exquisitely beautiful.
2. having a beauty that appeals to the heart or mind as well as to the eye, as a person or a face.
3. delightful; highly pleasing: to have a lovely time.
4. of a great moral or spiritual beauty.
[noun]
5. Informal: a beautiful woman, especially a show girl.
6. any person or thing that is pleasing, highly satisfying, or the like.
[adverb]
7. very well; splendidly.
Etymology: from Middle English luvelich, Old English luflīc, “amiable”.
[Jen Mann]

LOVELY

[adjective]

1. charmingly or exquisitely beautiful.

2. having a beauty that appeals to the heart or mind as well as to the eye, as a person or a face.

3. delightful; highly pleasing: to have a lovely time.

4. of a great moral or spiritual beauty.

[noun]

5. Informal: a beautiful woman, especially a show girl.

6. any person or thing that is pleasing, highly satisfying, or the like.

[adverb]

7. very well; splendidly.

Etymology: from Middle English luvelich, Old English luflīc, “amiable”.

[Jen Mann]

CARTOMANCY
[noun]
fortune-telling or divination via a deck of cards.
Etymology: from French cartomancie, from carte, "card" (from Latin charta, from Ancient Greek khártēs, “paper, papyrus”) + -mancie (from Greek manteía, “divination”).
[Lenka Simeckova - Cards]

CARTOMANCY

[noun]

fortune-telling or divination via a deck of cards.

Etymology: from French cartomancie, from carte, "card" (from Latin charta, from Ancient Greek khártēs, “paper, papyrus”) + -mancie (from Greek manteía, “divination”).

[Lenka Simeckova - Cards]

“Knowing you have something good to read before bed is among the most pleasurable of sensations.” — Vladimir Nabokov

CLEMENCY
[noun]
1. the quality of being clement; disposition to show forbearance, compassion, or forgiveness in judging or punishing; leniency; mercy.
2. an act or deed showing mercy or leniency.
3. (of the weather) mildness or temperateness.
Etymology: Latin clēmentia.
[Paul Romano - Consequences We Have Paid]

CLEMENCY

[noun]

1. the quality of being clement; disposition to show forbearance, compassion, or forgiveness in judging or punishing; leniency; mercy.

2. an act or deed showing mercy or leniency.

3. (of the weather) mildness or temperateness.

Etymology: Latin clēmentia.

[Paul Romano - Consequences We Have Paid]

Jul 23

bunny & books 

bunny & books 

AMISSIO
[noun]
1. loss; something that is lost; no longer possessed or retained.
2. deprivation; dispossession.
Etymology: Latin āmissiō.
[Daniel Conway]

AMISSIO

[noun]

1. loss; something that is lost; no longer possessed or retained.

2. deprivation; dispossession.

Etymology: Latin āmissiō.

[Daniel Conway]