A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles

Oct 01

[video]

[primary source & secondary source]

[primary source & secondary source]

GAIETY
[noun]
1. the state of being gay or cheerful; gay spirits.
2. often, gaieties - merrymaking or festivity.
3. showiness; finery.
Etymology: from French gaieté, from gai, “gay”.
[Herbert James Draper - Vintage Morn]

GAIETY

[noun]

1. the state of being gay or cheerful; gay spirits.

2. often, gaieties - merrymaking or festivity.

3. showiness; finery.

Etymology: from French gaieté, from gai, “gay”.

[Herbert James Draper - Vintage Morn]

Sep 30

MULTIVERSE
[noun]
the hypothetical set of multiple possible universes (including the historical universe we consistently experience) that together comprise everything that exists and can exist: the entirety of space, time, matter and energy as well as the physical laws and constants that describe them. An infinite realm of being or potential being of which the universe is regarded as a part or instance.
Etymology: based on universe, from Latin multi, combining form of multus, ”much, many” + verse, from versus, "turned".
[fyyff]

MULTIVERSE

[noun]

the hypothetical set of multiple possible universes (including the historical universe we consistently experience) that together comprise everything that exists and can exist: the entirety of space, time, matter and energy as well as the physical laws and constants that describe them. An infinite realm of being or potential being of which the universe is regarded as a part or instance.

Etymology: based on universe, from Latin multi, combining form of multus, ”much, many” + verse, from versus, "turned".

[fyyff]

FRANION
[noun]
1. a cheerful, frivolous person, a silly man; a gay, idle fellow.
2. a loose woman.
3. a paramour.
Etymology: origin uncertain, potentially from French fainéant, “an idler”.
[Leopold Schmutzler]

FRANION

[noun]

1. a cheerful, frivolous person, a silly man; a gay, idle fellow.

2. a loose woman.

3. a paramour.

Etymology: origin uncertain, potentially from French fainéant, “an idler”.

[Leopold Schmutzler]

[video]

Sep 29

PEONY
[noun]
any of various plants or shrubs of the genus Paeonia, having large, showy flowers, as the widely cultivated species P. lactiflora: the state flower of Indiana; a girl’s name after the flower Peony.
Etymology: from Old English peonie, from Latin paeōnia, from Greek paiōnia; related to paiōnios, “healing”, from paiōn, “physician”.
[Josephine Kahng]

PEONY

[noun]

any of various plants or shrubs of the genus Paeonia, having large, showy flowers, as the widely cultivated species P. lactiflora: the state flower of Indiana; a girl’s name after the flower Peony.

Etymology: from Old English peonie, from Latin paeōnia, from Greek paiōnia; related to paiōnios, “healing”, from paiōn, “physician”.

[Josephine Kahng]

AVIS
[noun] 
1. a bird.
2. an omen, portent.
Etymology: Latin from Proto-Italic *awis, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éwis. Cognates include Ancient Greek ἀετός (aetós) and Sanskrit वि (ví).
[April Schumacher]

AVIS

[noun]

1. a bird.

2. an omen, portent.

Etymology: Latin from Proto-Italic *awis, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éwis. Cognates include Ancient Greek ἀετός (aetós) and Sanskrit वि ().

[April Schumacher]

[video]

Sep 28

8 Words That Are Older Than You Think by Dictionary.com

[The Glass Bead Game by Hermann Hesse]

[The Glass Bead Game by Hermann Hesse]

[video]

MONO NO AWARE
[noun]
(物の哀れ), literally “the pathos of things”, also translated as “an empathy toward things”, or “a sensitivity to ephemera” - a Japanese term for the awareness of impermanence, or transience of things, and both a transient gentle sadness (or wistfulness) at their passing as well as a longer, deeper gentle sadness about this state being the reality of life.
Etymology: coined in the 18th century by the Edo period Japanese cultural scholar Motoori Norinaga. The phrase is derived from the Japanese word mono, which means “thing”, and aware, which was a Heian period expression of measured surprise (similar to “ah” or “oh”), translating roughly as “pathos”, “poignancy”, “deep feeling”, “sensitivity”, or “awareness”. Thus, mono no aware has frequently been translated as “the ‘ahh-ness’ of things”, life, and love. Content source.
[Martin Wittfooth]

MONO NO AWARE

[noun]

(物の哀れ), literally “the pathos of things”, also translated as “an empathy toward things”, or “a sensitivity to ephemera” - a Japanese term for the awareness of impermanence, or transience of things, and both a transient gentle sadness (or wistfulness) at their passing as well as a longer, deeper gentle sadness about this state being the reality of life.

Etymology: coined in the 18th century by the Edo period Japanese cultural scholar Motoori Norinaga. The phrase is derived from the Japanese word mono, which means “thing”, and aware, which was a Heian period expression of measured surprise (similar to “ah” or “oh”), translating roughly as “pathos”, “poignancy”, “deep feeling”, “sensitivity”, or “awareness”. Thus, mono no aware has frequently been translated as “the ‘ahh-ness’ of things”, life, and love. Content source.

[Martin Wittfooth]

Sep 27

FOLLY
[noun]
1. the state or quality of being foolish; lack of understanding or sense. 
2. a foolish action, practice, idea, etc.; absurdity. 
3. a costly and foolish undertaking; unwise investment or expenditure. 
4. Architecture: a whimsical or extravagant structure built to serve as a conversation piece, lend interest to a view, commemorate a person or event, etc.
5. follies, a theatrical revue.
Etymology: from Old French folie, “madness”, from the adjective fol, “mad, insane”.
[Caitlin Hackett - Wisdom Wounded by Folly]

FOLLY

[noun]

1. the state or quality of being foolish; lack of understanding or sense.

2. a foolish action, practice, idea, etc.; absurdity.

3. a costly and foolish undertaking; unwise investment or expenditure.

4. Architecture: a whimsical or extravagant structure built to serve as a conversation piece, lend interest to a view, commemorate a person or event, etc.

5. follies, a theatrical revue.

Etymology: from Old French folie, “madness”, from the adjective fol, “mad, insane”.

[Caitlin Hackett - Wisdom Wounded by Folly]

[video]