A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles

Aug 21

[video]

[video]

Aug 20

[video]

[video]

CARCANET
[noun]
1. an ornamental necklace, chain, collar; a richly decorated collar.
2. a woman’s ornamental circlet for the hair, often of gold decorated with jewels or pearls; headband.
Etymology: from Old French carcan, “collar”, perhaps from Mediaeval Latin carcannum, perhaps of Germanic origin.
[Nicholas Hilliard - The Hardwich Hall Portrait (Queen Elizabeth I of England)]

CARCANET

[noun]

1. an ornamental necklace, chain, collar; a richly decorated collar.

2. a woman’s ornamental circlet for the hair, often of gold decorated with jewels or pearls; headband.

Etymology: from Old French carcan, “collar”, perhaps from Mediaeval Latin carcannum, perhaps of Germanic origin.

[Nicholas Hilliard - The Hardwich Hall Portrait (Queen Elizabeth I of England)]

Aug 19

REPRISAL
[noun]
1. (in warfare) retaliation against an enemy, for injuries received, by the infliction of equal or greater injuries.
2. an act or instance of retaliation; vengeance.
3. the action or practice of using force, short of war, against another nation, to secure redress of a grievance.
4. the forcible seizure of property or subjects in retaliation.
Etymology: from Middle English reprisail, from Old French reprisaille, from Old Italian ripresaglia, from riprendere, “to recapture”, from Latin reprehendere, “to hold fast”.
[Tom Bagshaw - Drake’s Revenge]

REPRISAL

[noun]

1. (in warfare) retaliation against an enemy, for injuries received, by the infliction of equal or greater injuries.

2. an act or instance of retaliation; vengeance.

3. the action or practice of using force, short of war, against another nation, to secure redress of a grievance.

4. the forcible seizure of property or subjects in retaliation.

Etymology: from Middle English reprisail, from Old French reprisaille, from Old Italian ripresaglia, from riprendere, “to recapture”, from Latin reprehendere, “to hold fast”.

[Tom Bagshaw - Drake’s Revenge]

FLORATUS
[adjective]
embroidered with flowers; decorated with flowers; scented.
Etymology: Latin, ultimately from flōs, “flower”.
[Zhang Jingna]

FLORATUS

[adjective]

embroidered with flowers; decorated with flowers; scented.

Etymology: Latin, ultimately from flōs, “flower”.

[Zhang Jingna]

SOMNIFEROUS
[adjective]
inducing sleep; soporific.
Etymology: from Latin somnifer, from somnus, “sleep” + ferre, “to do”.
[Franciszek Żmurko]

SOMNIFEROUS

[adjective]

inducing sleep; soporific.

Etymology: from Latin somnifer, from somnus, “sleep” + ferre, “to do”.

[Franciszek Żmurko]

Aug 18

EUPHOBIA
[noun]
Informal: the morbid fear of hearing or receiving good news.
Etymology: from Ancient Greek εὖ (eû, “well, good”) + -φοβία (-phobía, from phóbos, “fear”). It is uncertain how eu, i.e. “good” developed into encompassing “good news”.
[Ilovedoodle - Good News is On The Way]

EUPHOBIA

[noun]

Informal: the morbid fear of hearing or receiving good news.

Etymology: from Ancient Greek εὖ (, “well, good”) + -φοβία (-phobía, from phóbos, “fear”). It is uncertain how eu, i.e. “good” developed into encompassing “good news”.

[Ilovedoodle - Good News is On The Way]

[image source]

[image source]

[video]

Aug 17

A fabulous photo of Roald Dahl.
[image source]

A fabulous photo of Roald Dahl.

[image source]

METAGROBOLIZE
[verb]
to mystify; to puzzle out.
Etymology: origin uncertain, thought to be from obsolete French metagraboulizer.
[Nicebleed & Kyle Cobban - The Solution]

METAGROBOLIZE

[verb]

to mystify; to puzzle out.

Etymology: origin uncertain, thought to be from obsolete French metagraboulizer.

[Nicebleed & Kyle Cobban - The Solution]

ANTHOLOGER
[noun]
1. one who collects flowers.
2. one who compiles a collection of literary works for publishing.
Etymology: Latin anthologia < Greek, literally, gathering of flowers; from anthos, “flower” + legein, “to collect”.
[John William Waterhouse]

ANTHOLOGER

[noun]

1. one who collects flowers.

2. one who compiles a collection of literary works for publishing.

Etymology: Latin anthologia < Greek, literally, gathering of flowers; from anthos, “flower” + legein, “to collect”.

[John William Waterhouse]

Aug 16

MERCOLEDÌ
[noun]
Wednesday; the fourth day of the week in many religious traditions, and the third day of the week in systems using the ISO 8601 norm; it follows Tuesday and precedes Thursday.
Etymology: Italian, from Latin Mercuriī diēs, variant of diēs Mercuriī (“day of Mercury”).
[Phillicia Deanell]

MERCOLEDÌ

[noun]

Wednesday; the fourth day of the week in many religious traditions, and the third day of the week in systems using the ISO 8601 norm; it follows Tuesday and precedes Thursday.

Etymology: Italian, from Latin Mercuriī diēs, variant of diēs Mercuriī (“day of Mercury”).

[Phillicia Deanell]