A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles

Jul 28

[video]

PSYCHURGY
[noun]
mental function, operation or energy.
Etymology: from Greek psukhē, “spirit, breath” + -urgy, a combining form occurring in loanwords from Greek, meaning “work”, from -ourgia, akin to érgon, “to work”.
[Peter Gric - Dream Generator]

PSYCHURGY

[noun]

mental function, operation or energy.

Etymology: from Greek psukhē, “spirit, breath” + -urgy, a combining form occurring in loanwords from Greek, meaning “work”, from -ourgia, akin to érgon, “to work”.

[Peter Gric - Dream Generator]

[video]

Jul 27

COLLYWOBBLES
[noun]
1. intestinal cramps or other intestinal disturbances.
2. a feeling of fear, apprehension, or nervousness; anxiety.
Etymology: probably from New Latin cholera morbus the disease cholera, influenced through folk etymology by colic and wobble.
[Nicolas Delort - The Waking that Kills]

COLLYWOBBLES

[noun]

1. intestinal cramps or other intestinal disturbances.

2. a feeling of fear, apprehension, or nervousness; anxiety.

Etymology: probably from New Latin cholera morbus the disease cholera, influenced through folk etymology by colic and wobble.

[Nicolas Delort - The Waking that Kills]

NEMORICOLOUS
[adjective]
living in forests or groves.
Etymology: from Latin nemori- (stem of nemus), “grove” + -colous, a combining form meaning “inhabiting”.
[Sylvain Sarrailh]

NEMORICOLOUS

[adjective]

living in forests or groves.

Etymology: from Latin nemori- (stem of nemus), “grove” + -colous, a combining form meaning “inhabiting”.

[Sylvain Sarrailh]

[video]

HALLOW
[verb]
1. to make holy; sanctify; consecrate.
2. to honour as holy; consider sacred; venerate.
Etymology: from Middle English hal(o)wen, Old English hālgian, cognate with German heiligen, Old Norse helga, derivative of hālig, “holy”.
[Tom Bagshaw - Hallowed Age]

HALLOW

[verb]

1. to make holy; sanctify; consecrate.

2. to honour as holy; consider sacred; venerate.

Etymology: from Middle English hal(o)wen, Old English hālgian, cognate with German heiligen, Old Norse helga, derivative of hālig, “holy”.

[Tom Bagshaw - Hallowed Age]

ARBOR VITAE
[noun]
1. Latin: “tree of life”.
2. Neuroanatomy: the cerebellar white matter in the brain, so called for its branched, tree-like appearance. It brings sensory and motor information to and from the cerebellum.
3. Female reproduction: “arbor vitæ uteri” - a part of the canal of the cervix.
4. Victorian slang: the penis.
[Benny Andersson - Tree of Life]

ARBOR VITAE

[noun]

1. Latin: “tree of life”.

2. Neuroanatomy: the cerebellar white matter in the brain, so called for its branched, tree-like appearance. It brings sensory and motor information to and from the cerebellum.

3. Female reproduction: “arbor vitæ uteri” a part of the canal of the cervix.

4. Victorian slang: the penis.

[Benny Andersson - Tree of Life]

[video]

Jul 26

CHIROPTERAN
[adjective]
of, relating to, or belonging to the Chiroptera, an order of placental mammals comprising the bats.
Etymology: from Ancient Greek χειρ (kheir, “hand”) + πτερόν (pterón, “wing”).
[Audrey Benjaminsen - The Bat Rider]

CHIROPTERAN

[adjective]

of, relating to, or belonging to the Chiroptera, an order of placental mammals comprising the bats.

Etymology: from Ancient Greek χειρ (kheir, “hand”) + πτερόν (pterón, “wing”).

[Audrey Benjaminsen - The Bat Rider]

SCHLAF
[noun]
sleep; dormancy or inactivity.
Etymology: German, from Old High German slāf, from Proto-Germanic *slēpaz. Cognate with Low German Slap, Slaap, Dutch slaap, and English sleep.
[Kelly Louise Judd - Forest Sleep]

SCHLAF

[noun]

sleep; dormancy or inactivity.

Etymology: German, from Old High German slāf, from Proto-Germanic *slēpaz. Cognate with Low German Slap, Slaap, Dutch slaap, and English sleep.

[Kelly Louise Judd - Forest Sleep]

FEY
[adjective]
1. a) having or displaying an otherworldly, magical, or fairylike aspect or quality; enchanting. b) having visionary power; clairvoyant; attuned to the supernatural. c) appearing touched or crazy, as if under a spell; slightly insane; whimsical; strange.
2. Scots: a) fated to die soon; doomed. b) full of the sense of approaching death; in a state of high spirits or unusual excitement, formerly believed to presage death.
Etymology: Middle English; Old English fǣge - doomed to die; Old Saxon fēgi, Old High German feigi, Old Norse feigr.
[Michel Ogier]

FEY

[adjective]

1. a) having or displaying an otherworldly, magical, or fairylike aspect or quality; enchanting. b) having visionary power; clairvoyant; attuned to the supernatural. c) appearing touched or crazy, as if under a spell; slightly insane; whimsical; strange.

2. Scots: a) fated to die soon; doomed. b) full of the sense of approaching death; in a state of high spirits or unusual excitement, formerly believed to presage death.

Etymology: Middle English; Old English fǣge - doomed to die; Old Saxon fēgi, Old High German feigi, Old Norse feigr.

[Michel Ogier]

LACTIFEROUS
[adjective]
1. producing, secreting, or conveying milk.
2. Botany: yielding latex.
Etymology: from Neo-Latin lactifer, “that bears milk”.
[Christian Schloe]

LACTIFEROUS

[adjective]

1. producing, secreting, or conveying milk.

2. Botany: yielding latex.

Etymology: from Neo-Latin lactifer, “that bears milk”.

[Christian Schloe]

[video]

Jul 25

TRANSGRESS
[verb]
1. to violate a law, command, moral code, etc.; offend; sin.
2. to pass over or go beyond (a limit, boundary, etc.
3. to go beyond the limits imposed by (a law, command, etc.); violate; infringe.
Etymology: from Latin trānsgressus, past participle of trānsgredī, “to step across”.
[submitted by Nikita Kaun - A Tribute to Breaking Bad]

TRANSGRESS

[verb]

1. to violate a law, command, moral code, etc.; offend; sin.

2. to pass over or go beyond (a limit, boundary, etc.

3. to go beyond the limits imposed by (a law, command, etc.); violate; infringe.

Etymology: from Latin trānsgressus, past participle of trānsgredī, “to step across”.

[submitted by Nikita Kaun - A Tribute to Breaking Bad]