A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles

Sep 01

ITINERARY
[noun]
1. a detailed plan for a journey, especially a list of places to visit; plan of travel.
2. a line of travel; route.
3. an account of a journey; record of travel.
4. a book describing a route or routes of travel with information helpful to travellers; guidebook for travellers.
[adjective]
5. of or pertaining to travel or travel routes.
6. itinerant; pertaining to a person who alternates between working and wandering.
Etymology: fom Late Latin itinerarius, “pertaining to a journey”, neuter itinerarium, “an account of a journey, a road-book”, from iter, “a way, journey”.
[Jorge Jacinto]

ITINERARY

[noun]

1. a detailed plan for a journey, especially a list of places to visit; plan of travel.

2. a line of travel; route.

3. an account of a journey; record of travel.

4. a book describing a route or routes of travel with information helpful to travellers; guidebook for travellers.

[adjective]

5. of or pertaining to travel or travel routes.

6. itinerant; pertaining to a person who alternates between working and wandering.

Etymology: fom Late Latin itinerarius, “pertaining to a journey”, neuter itinerarium, “an account of a journey, a road-book”, from iter, “a way, journey”.

[Jorge Jacinto]

SUCETTE
[noun]
1. lollipop; a round hard piece of candy (or sweet) on the end of a stick.
2. sucker; dummy; comforter; pacifier.
Etymology: French.
[Tom Bagshaw - Kuchisake-Onna]

SUCETTE

[noun]

1. lollipop; a round hard piece of candy (or sweet) on the end of a stick.

2. sucker; dummy; comforter; pacifier.

Etymology: French.

[Tom Bagshaw - Kuchisake-Onna]

BLATHERSKITE
[noun]
1. a person who talks at great length without making much sense; nonsense; blather; empty talk.
2. an obnoxious braggart.
Etymology: blather (from Middle English; Old Norse blathra, “to chatter, blabber”) + skite (potentially from Middle English scate < Old Norse skati).
[image source]

BLATHERSKITE

[noun]

1. a person who talks at great length without making much sense; nonsense; blather; empty talk.

2. an obnoxious braggart.

Etymology: blather (from Middle English; Old Norse blathra, “to chatter, blabber”) + skite (potentially from Middle English scate < Old Norse skati).

[image source]

Aug 31

GEMEL 
[adjective] 
1. coupled; paired. 
[noun]
2. one of the twins; a twin.
3. one of a pair of small bars placed together. 
4. a finger ring which splits into two horizontally.
Etymology: from Old French gemel, from Latin gemellus, diminutive of geminus, “twin”.
[Josephine Kahng]

GEMEL

[adjective]

1. coupled; paired.

[noun]

2. one of the twins; a twin.

3. one of a pair of small bars placed together.

4. a finger ring which splits into two horizontally.

Etymology: from Old French gemel, from Latin gemellus, diminutive of geminus, “twin”.

[Josephine Kahng]

DELECTATION
[noun]
delight; enjoyment.
Etymology: Middle English delectacioun &lt; Latin dēlectātiōn- (stem of dēlectātiō), equivalent to dēlectāt(us).
[Sylar113]

DELECTATION

[noun]

delight; enjoyment.

Etymology: Middle English delectacioun < Latin dēlectātiōn- (stem of dēlectātiō), equivalent to dēlectāt(us).

[Sylar113]

RIPARIAN
[adjective]
1. of, pertaining to, or situated or dwelling on the bank of a river or other body of water; of the river.
[noun]
2. Law: a person who owns land on the bank of a natural watercourse or body of water. 
Etymology: from Latin rīpārius, from rīpa, “a river bank”.
[Autumn Skye Morrison - The Call of the River]

RIPARIAN

[adjective]

1. of, pertaining to, or situated or dwelling on the bank of a river or other body of water; of the river.

[noun]

2. Law: a person who owns land on the bank of a natural watercourse or body of water. 

Etymology: from Latin rīpārius, from rīpa, “a river bank”.

[Autumn Skye Morrison - The Call of the River]

Aug 30

STHENIA
[noun]
a condition of bodily strength, vigour, or vitality.
Etymology: Neo Latin, extracted from asthenia, from Greek asthéneia, from a, “not” + sthenos, “strength”.
[Cyril Rolando]

STHENIA

[noun]

a condition of bodily strength, vigour, or vitality.

Etymology: Neo Latin, extracted from asthenia, from Greek asthéneia, from a, “not” + sthenos, “strength”.

[Cyril Rolando]

MELOPHILIA
[noun]
an obsessive love for music.
Etymology: from Latin melos (music) + Greek philia (love).
 [Charles François Jalabert - Nymphs Listening to the Songs of Orpheus]

MELOPHILIA

[noun]

an obsessive love for music.

Etymology: from Latin melos (music) + Greek philia (love).

 [Charles François Jalabert - Nymphs Listening to the Songs of Orpheus]

28 Brilliant Works Of Literary Graffiti -

Aug 29

XYLOPHILIA
[noun]
a love for forests, woods, groves.
Etymology: from Greek xulon, &#8220;wood&#8221; + philia, &#8220;love&#8221;.
[Christian Schloe - The Wandering Forest]

XYLOPHILIA

[noun]

a love for forests, woods, groves.

Etymology: from Greek xulon, “wood” + philia, “love”.

[Christian Schloe - The Wandering Forest]

NOBLESSE OBLIGE
[phrase]
a French phrase literally meaning &#8220;nobility obliges&#8221;. It is the concept that nobility extends beyond mere entitlements and requires the person with such status to fulfill social responsibilities, particularly in leadership roles; the obligation of honorable, generous, and responsible behaviour associated with high rank or birth.
Etymology: French, noblesse, “nobility” (ultimately from Latin nobilis, “knowable, known, well-known, famous, celebrated, high-born, of noble birth, excellent”) + oblige, “obliges” (ultimately from Latin ob, “to, against” + ligō, “bind, unite”).
[vtas]

NOBLESSE OBLIGE

[phrase]

a French phrase literally meaning “nobility obliges”. It is the concept that nobility extends beyond mere entitlements and requires the person with such status to fulfill social responsibilities, particularly in leadership roles; the obligation of honorable, generous, and responsible behaviour associated with high rank or birth.

Etymology: French, noblesse, “nobility” (ultimately from Latin nobilis, “knowable, known, well-known, famous, celebrated, high-born, of noble birth, excellent”) + oblige, “obliges” (ultimately from Latin ob, “to, against” + ligō, “bind, unite”).

[vtas]

PATRICIAN
[noun]
1. a person of noble or high rank; aristocrat.
2. a person of very good background, education, and refinement.
3. a member of the original senatorial aristocracy in ancient Rome.
4. (under the later Roman and Byzantine empires) a title or dignity conferred by the emperor.
5. a member of a hereditary ruling class in certain medieval German, Swiss, and Italian free cities.
[adjective]
6. of high social rank or noble family; aristocratic.
7. befitting or characteristic of persons of very good background, education, and refinement.
8. of or belonging to the patrician families of ancient Rome.
Etymology: from Old French patricien, from Latin patricius, “noble”, from pater, “father”.
[Naoto Hattori - The Frog Prince]

PATRICIAN

[noun]

1. a person of noble or high rank; aristocrat.

2. a person of very good background, education, and refinement.

3. a member of the original senatorial aristocracy in ancient Rome.

4. (under the later Roman and Byzantine empires) a title or dignity conferred by the emperor.

5. a member of a hereditary ruling class in certain medieval German, Swiss, and Italian free cities.

[adjective]

6. of high social rank or noble family; aristocratic.

7. befitting or characteristic of persons of very good background, education, and refinement.

8. of or belonging to the patrician families of ancient Rome.

Etymology: from Old French patricien, from Latin patricius, “noble”, from pater, “father”.

[Naoto Hattori - The Frog Prince]

Aug 28

[video]

DESIDERIUM
[noun]
1. longing, desire, wish.
2. grief, regret.
3. need, necessity.
4. (In plural) pleasures, desires.
Etymology: Latin from dēsīderō, “want, desire, wish for; miss, lack, need”.
[bubug]

DESIDERIUM

[noun]

1. longing, desire, wish.

2. grief, regret.

3. need, necessity.

4. (In plural) pleasures, desires.

Etymology: Latin from dēsīderō, “want, desire, wish for; miss, lack, need”.

[bubug]

JENTACULAR
[adjective]
of or pertaining to a breakfast taken early in the morning, or immediately on getting up.
Etymology: from Latin ientaculum, “a breakfast taken immediately on getting up”.
[Lee Price]

JENTACULAR

[adjective]

of or pertaining to a breakfast taken early in the morning, or immediately on getting up.

Etymology: from Latin ientaculum, “a breakfast taken immediately on getting up”.

[Lee Price]