A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
COTHURNAL
[adjective]
of or related to tragedy or tragic acting.
Etymology: From Latin, from Greek kothornos (a thick-soled laced boot worn by tragic actors in ancient Athenian tragedies).
[Edward H. Bell]

COTHURNAL

[adjective]

of or related to tragedy or tragic acting.

Etymology: From Latin, from Greek kothornos (a thick-soled laced boot worn by tragic actors in ancient Athenian tragedies).

[Edward H. Bell]

NOIR
[noun]
1. Film noir: a genre of crime film or fiction characterised by cynicism, sexual motivation, fatalism, and moral ambiguity.
2. the colour black.
[adjective]
3. of or pertaining to film noir.
4. suggestive of danger or violence.
5. tough and bleakly pessimistic.
Etymology: from French noir, “black”; from Old French noir, neir; from Latin niger, nigrum.
[Mikael Bourgouin - Noir]

NOIR

[noun]

1. Film noir: a genre of crime film or fiction characterised by cynicism, sexual motivation, fatalism, and moral ambiguity.

2. the colour black.

[adjective]

3. of or pertaining to film noir.

4. suggestive of danger or violence.

5. tough and bleakly pessimistic.

Etymology: from French noir, “black”; from Old French noir, neir; from Latin niger, nigrum.

[Mikael Bourgouin - Noir]

PECKISH
[adjective]
1. somewhat hungry; having an appetite; the desire to eat something.
2. rather irritable.
Etmyology: Middle English pecke < Middle Dutch pecken + Middle English; Old English -isc; cognate with German -isch, Gothic -isks, Greek -iskos.
[Christian Schloe]

PECKISH

[adjective]

1. somewhat hungry; having an appetite; the desire to eat something.

2. rather irritable.

Etmyology: Middle English pecke < Middle Dutch pecken + Middle English; Old English -isc; cognate with German -isch, Gothic -isks, Greek -iskos.

[Christian Schloe]

Individual words, sounds, squiggles on paper with no meanings other than those with which our imagination can clothe them.
Jasper Fforde, The Eyre Affair

FORINSECAL

[adjective]

foreign; alien; extrinsic. 

Etymology: from Latin forinsecus, ‘from without”, derived from forās, “outside”.

[Vladimir Stankovic]

NOCTURNALIA

[noun]

1. any night activities.

2. festival at night.

Etymologynocturne (Latin, derived from ‘nox’ - night) + -alia (suffix: items connected with the particular area of activity or interest mentioned).

[James R. Eads]

VINACEOUS

[adjective]

1. of, pertaining to, or resembling wine or grapes.

2. of the colour of red wine.

Etymology: from Late Latin vīnāceus, from Latin vīnum, “wine”.

[Alexei Antonov]

BALNEARE

[adjective]

bathing.

Etymology: from Latin balneum.

[Lee Price]

CARCANET
[noun]
1. an ornamental necklace, chain, collar; a richly decorated collar.
2. a woman&#8217;s ornamental circlet for the hair, often of gold decorated with jewels or pearls; headband.
Etymology: from Old French carcan, “collar”, perhaps from Mediaeval Latin carcannum, perhaps of Germanic origin.
[Nicholas Hilliard - The Hardwich Hall Portrait (Queen Elizabeth I of England)]

CARCANET

[noun]

1. an ornamental necklace, chain, collar; a richly decorated collar.

2. a woman’s ornamental circlet for the hair, often of gold decorated with jewels or pearls; headband.

Etymology: from Old French carcan, “collar”, perhaps from Mediaeval Latin carcannum, perhaps of Germanic origin.

[Nicholas Hilliard - The Hardwich Hall Portrait (Queen Elizabeth I of England)]

REPRISAL
[noun]
1. (in warfare) retaliation against an enemy, for injuries received, by the infliction of equal or greater injuries.
2. an act or instance of retaliation; vengeance.
3. the action or practice of using force, short of war, against another nation, to secure redress of a grievance.
4. the forcible seizure of property or subjects in retaliation.
Etymology: from Middle English reprisail, from Old French reprisaille, from Old Italian ripresaglia, from riprendere, “to recapture”, from Latin reprehendere, “to hold fast”.
[Tom Bagshaw - Drake&#8217;s Revenge]

REPRISAL

[noun]

1. (in warfare) retaliation against an enemy, for injuries received, by the infliction of equal or greater injuries.

2. an act or instance of retaliation; vengeance.

3. the action or practice of using force, short of war, against another nation, to secure redress of a grievance.

4. the forcible seizure of property or subjects in retaliation.

Etymology: from Middle English reprisail, from Old French reprisaille, from Old Italian ripresaglia, from riprendere, “to recapture”, from Latin reprehendere, “to hold fast”.

[Tom Bagshaw - Drake’s Revenge]

FLORATUS
[adjective]
embroidered with flowers; decorated with flowers; scented.
Etymology: Latin, ultimately from flōs, &#8220;flower&#8221;.
[Zhang Jingna]

FLORATUS

[adjective]

embroidered with flowers; decorated with flowers; scented.

Etymology: Latin, ultimately from flōs, “flower”.

[Zhang Jingna]

SOMNIFEROUS
[adjective]
inducing sleep; soporific.
Etymology: from Latin somnifer, from somnus, “sleep” + ferre, “to do”.
[Franciszek Żmurko]

SOMNIFEROUS

[adjective]

inducing sleep; soporific.

Etymology: from Latin somnifer, from somnus, “sleep” + ferre, “to do”.

[Franciszek Żmurko]

EUPHOBIA
[noun]
Informal: the morbid fear of hearing or receiving good news.
Etymology: from Ancient Greek εὖ (eû, “well, good”) + -φοβία (-phobía, from phóbos, “fear”). It is uncertain how eu, i.e. “good” developed into encompassing “good news”.
[Ilovedoodle - Good News is On The Way]

EUPHOBIA

[noun]

Informal: the morbid fear of hearing or receiving good news.

Etymology: from Ancient Greek εὖ (, “well, good”) + -φοβία (-phobía, from phóbos, “fear”). It is uncertain how eu, i.e. “good” developed into encompassing “good news”.

[Ilovedoodle - Good News is On The Way]

[image source]

CRYPTOZOOLOGY

[noun]

the study of evidence tending to substantiate the existence of, or the search for, creatures whose reported existence is unproved, as the Abominable Snowman or the Loch Ness monster. The discipline is traditionally viewed as a pseudoscience.

Etymology: from Greek kryptos, “hidden” + zoology; “study of animals”, literally, “study of hidden animals”.

[Vladimir Stankovic]