A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
MUZYKA
[noun]
music; chime; note; vocal or instrumental sounds (or both) combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form, harmony, and expression of emotion.
Etymology: Russian музыка.
[Alexei Antonov]

MUZYKA

[noun]

music; chime; note; vocal or instrumental sounds (or both) combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form, harmony, and expression of emotion.

Etymology: Russian музыка.

[Alexei Antonov]

PHARMACOLOGY

[noun]

the branch of medicine and biology concerned with the study of drug action, where a drug can be broadly defined as any man-made, natural, or endogenous (within the body) molecule which exerts a biochemical and/or physiological effect on the cell, tissue, organ, or organism.

Etymology: from Greek φάρμακον, pharmakon, “poison” in classic Greek, “drug” in modern Greek; and -λογία, -logia, “study of”, “knowledge of”.

[Julia Yellow]

NEOMENIA
[noun]
1. the time of the new moon; the beginning of the month in the lunar calendar.
2. the festival of the new moon.
Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin, from Greek neomēnia, from ne- (new) + -mēnia (thought to be from mēnē, “moon, month” – origin uncertain).
[Siegfriend Zademack - Die Zwei]

NEOMENIA

[noun]

1. the time of the new moon; the beginning of the month in the lunar calendar.

2. the festival of the new moon.

Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin, from Greek neomēnia, from ne- (new) + -mēnia (thought to be from mēnē, “moon, month” – origin uncertain).

[Siegfriend Zademack - Die Zwei]

SEMPITERNAL
[adjective]
everlasting; eternal.
Etymology: late Middle English < Late Latin sempiternālis.
[Andrew Forrest - Octaves of Infinity]

SEMPITERNAL

[adjective]

everlasting; eternal.

Etymology: late Middle English < Late Latin sempiternālis.

[Andrew Forrest - Octaves of Infinity]

CANOROUS
[adjective]
melodious; musical; tuneful; sweet sounding.
Etymology: Latin canōrus.
[Mike Azevedo - Sing For Me, Little Bird]

CANOROUS

[adjective]

melodious; musical; tuneful; sweet sounding.

Etymology: Latin canōrus.

[Mike Azevedo - Sing For Me, Little Bird]

OBJECTIFY
[verb]
1. to present or regard as an object; often presented negatively, i.e. to degrade to the status of an object.
2. to make objective, external, or concrete.
Etymology: object, from Middle English, “something perceived, purpose, objection”, ultimately derived from Latin objectāre, “to throw or put before, oppose” + -ify, variant of -fy after a consonant, a suffix meaning “to make”, “to cause to be”, ultimately from Latin -ficāre, “to do, make”.
[Waldemar von Kozak]

OBJECTIFY

[verb]

1. to present or regard as an object; often presented negatively, i.e. to degrade to the status of an object.

2. to make objective, external, or concrete.

Etymology: object, from Middle English, “something perceived, purpose, objection”, ultimately derived from Latin objectāre, “to throw or put before, oppose” + -ify, variant of -fy after a consonant, a suffix meaning “to make”, “to cause to be”, ultimately from Latin -ficāre, “to do, make”.

[Waldemar von Kozak]

IMMANITAS
[noun]
1. immensity, vastness, excess.
2. monstrousness, enormity, fierceness, cruelty, barbarism; savagery; frightfulness.
Etymology: Latin immānitās.
[Olivia Chin Mueller - Panther]

IMMANITAS

[noun]

1. immensity, vastness, excess.

2. monstrousness, enormity, fierceness, cruelty, barbarism; savagery; frightfulness.

Etymology: Latin immānitās.

[Olivia Chin Mueller - Panther]

ROSÉE

[noun]

dew; moisture condensed from the atmosphere, especially at night, and deposited in the form of small drops upon any cool surface.

Etymology: French.

[Marianne Le Carrour]

PSYCHURGY
[noun]
mental function, operation or energy.
Etymology: from Greek psukhē, “spirit, breath” + -urgy, a combining form occurring in loanwords from Greek, meaning “work”, from -ourgia, akin to érgon, “to work”.
[Peter Gric - Dream Generator]

PSYCHURGY

[noun]

mental function, operation or energy.

Etymology: from Greek psukhē, “spirit, breath” + -urgy, a combining form occurring in loanwords from Greek, meaning “work”, from -ourgia, akin to érgon, “to work”.

[Peter Gric - Dream Generator]

VIM

[noun]

lively or energetic spirit; enthusiasm; vitality.

Etymology: Americanism; < Latin, accusative of vīs, “energy, force”.

[Toshio Ebine]

COLLYWOBBLES
[noun]
1. intestinal cramps or other intestinal disturbances.
2. a feeling of fear, apprehension, or nervousness; anxiety.
Etymology: probably from New Latin cholera morbus the disease cholera, influenced through folk etymology by colic and wobble.
[Nicolas Delort - The Waking that Kills]

COLLYWOBBLES

[noun]

1. intestinal cramps or other intestinal disturbances.

2. a feeling of fear, apprehension, or nervousness; anxiety.

Etymology: probably from New Latin cholera morbus the disease cholera, influenced through folk etymology by colic and wobble.

[Nicolas Delort - The Waking that Kills]

NEMORICOLOUS
[adjective]
living in forests or groves.
Etymology: from Latin nemori- (stem of nemus), “grove” + -colous, a combining form meaning “inhabiting”.
[Sylvain Sarrailh]

NEMORICOLOUS

[adjective]

living in forests or groves.

Etymology: from Latin nemori- (stem of nemus), “grove” + -colous, a combining form meaning “inhabiting”.

[Sylvain Sarrailh]

CINERARY

[adjective]

1. of, like or pertaining to ashes.

2. holding or intended for ashes, especially the ashes of cremated bodies.

Etymology: from Latin, from cinerārius, “relating to ashes”.

[Agostino Arrivabene - Elogio Della Polvere]

HALLOW
[verb]
1. to make holy; sanctify; consecrate.
2. to honour as holy; consider sacred; venerate.
Etymology: from Middle English hal(o)wen, Old English hālgian, cognate with German heiligen, Old Norse helga, derivative of hālig, “holy”.
[Tom Bagshaw - Hallowed Age]

HALLOW

[verb]

1. to make holy; sanctify; consecrate.

2. to honour as holy; consider sacred; venerate.

Etymology: from Middle English hal(o)wen, Old English hālgian, cognate with German heiligen, Old Norse helga, derivative of hālig, “holy”.

[Tom Bagshaw - Hallowed Age]

ARBOR VITAE
[noun]
1. Latin: “tree of life”.
2. Neuroanatomy: the cerebellar white matter in the brain, so called for its branched, tree-like appearance. It brings sensory and motor information to and from the cerebellum.
3. Female reproduction: “arbor vitæ uteri” - a part of the canal of the cervix.
4. Victorian slang: the penis.
[Benny Andersson - Tree of Life]

ARBOR VITAE

[noun]

1. Latin: “tree of life”.

2. Neuroanatomy: the cerebellar white matter in the brain, so called for its branched, tree-like appearance. It brings sensory and motor information to and from the cerebellum.

3. Female reproduction: “arbor vitæ uteri” a part of the canal of the cervix.

4. Victorian slang: the penis.

[Benny Andersson - Tree of Life]