A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
MORIOR
[verb]
1. to die, wither away, decay. 
2. I die.
3. I wither; I decay.
Etymology: Latin, from Proto-Indo-European *mer- “to die”.
[noiaillustration]

MORIOR

[verb]

1. to die, wither away, decay. 

2. I die.

3. I wither; I decay.

Etymology: Latin, from Proto-Indo-European *mer- “to die”.

[noiaillustration]

TOURNESOL
[noun]
sunflower; any of various composite plants of the genus Helianthus, as H. annuus, having showy, yellow-rayed flower heads often 12 inches (30 cm) wide, and edible seeds that yield an oil with a wide variety of uses.
Etymology: French, from tourner (from Old French torner, from Latin tornāre, present active infinitive of tornō, “turn” + sol (from Latin sol, “sun”).
[Oscar-Claude Monet]

TOURNESOL

[noun]

sunflower; any of various composite plants of the genus Helianthus, as H. annuus, having showy, yellow-rayed flower heads often 12 inches (30 cm) wide, and edible seeds that yield an oil with a wide variety of uses.

Etymology: French, from tourner (from Old French torner, from Latin tornāre, present active infinitive of tornō, “turn” + sol (from Latin sol, “sun”).

[Oscar-Claude Monet]

URINATOR 
[noun] 
one who dives under water in search of something, as for pearls; a diver. 
Etymology: from Latin urinari - to plunge under water, to dive.
[Elisabetta Trevisan]

URINATOR 

[noun] 
one who dives under water in search of something, as for pearls; a diver. 

Etymology: from Latin urinari - to plunge under water, to dive.

[Elisabetta Trevisan]

INIMICAL
[adjective]
1. adverse in tendency or effect; unfavourable; harmful.
2. unfriendly; hostile.
Etymology: Latin inimīc (us) - unfriendly, hostile.
[Robert Carter]

INIMICAL

[adjective]

1. adverse in tendency or effect; unfavourable; harmful.

2. unfriendly; hostile.

Etymology: Latin inimīc (us) - unfriendly, hostile.

[Robert Carter]

HEDERATE

[verb]

to decorate with ivy.

Etymology: from Latin hedera, “ivy”.

[Madeline von Foerster]

KOSZMAR
[noun]
nightmare; a frightening or unpleasant dream.
Etymology: Polish, from French, from Middle French cauchemare, from Old French cauquemare; composed by two elements, blend of cauche (ultimately from Latin calcō, “trample, tread on”) and mar (ultimately from Proto-Germanic *marǭ, “nightmare, incubus”, from Proto-Indo-European *mor-, “malicious female spirit”.
[Imaginism Studios]

KOSZMAR

[noun]

nightmare; a frightening or unpleasant dream.

Etymology: Polish, from French, from Middle French cauchemare, from Old French cauquemare; composed by two elements, blend of cauche (ultimately from Latin calcō, “trample, tread on”) and mar (ultimately from Proto-Germanic *marǭ, “nightmare, incubus”, from Proto-Indo-European *mor-, “malicious female spirit”.

[Imaginism Studios]

TALION
[noun]
a punishment identical to the offense, as the death penalty for murder; the system or legal principle of making the punishment correspond to the crime; retaliation.
Etymology: via Old French from Latin tāliō, from tālis “such”.
[Jim Lee]

TALION

[noun]

a punishment identical to the offense, as the death penalty for murder; the system or legal principle of making the punishment correspond to the crime; retaliation.

Etymology: via Old French from Latin tāliō, from tālis “such”.

[Jim Lee]

TEMULENCE
[noun]
intoxication; inebriation; drunkenness; any mild-altering affect by a drug.
Etymology: from Latin temulentus < temetum, “an intoxicating drink”.
[Cheong-ah Hwang]

TEMULENCE

[noun]

intoxication; inebriation; drunkenness; any mild-altering affect by a drug.

Etymology: from Latin temulentus < temetum, “an intoxicating drink”.

[Cheong-ah Hwang]

POMME
[noun]
apple (fruit).
Etymology: French, from Latin poma, plural of pomum.
[Joel Hustak]

POMME

[noun]

apple (fruit).

Etymology: French, from Latin poma, plural of pomum.

[Joel Hustak]

DAFFADOWNDILLY

[noun]

an archaic and poetic variation for daffodil, a yellow or white spring flower.

Etymology: alteration of daffodil; unexplained variant of Middle English affodile < Vulgar Latin affodillus, variant of asphodelus < Greek asphódelos, “asphodel”.

[image source]

CONEY [aka CONY]

[noun]

1. a rabbit.

2. the fur of a rabbit.

Etymology: Middle English coni, from Anglo-French conil, from Latin cuniculus. Alternative definitions for coney.

[Kei Acedera]

MOHNBLUMEN [pl.]
[noun]
poppies; any plant of the genus Papaver, having showy, usually red flowers. Singular Mohnblume.
Etymology: German mohn, &#8220;poppy&#8221; + blume(n), &#8220;flowers&#8221;.
[John Ottis Adams]

MOHNBLUMEN [pl.]

[noun]

poppies; any plant of the genus Papaver, having showy, usually red flowers. Singular Mohnblume.

Etymology: German mohn, “poppy” + blume(n), “flowers”.

[John Ottis Adams]

BRIMBORION

[noun]

a thing without value or use; trash, nonsense.

Etymology: French, earliest use recorded in the 15th century.

[image source]

LILLE [neuter]
[adjective]
1. small, little, slight.
2. short.
3. miniature.
4. lower case.
5. less than, just under, not quite.
Etymology: Danish, from Old Norse lítli, a definite form of lítill.
[Annie Stegg - Thumbelina]

LILLE [neuter]

[adjective]

1. small, little, slight.

2. short.

3. miniature.

4. lower case.

5. less than, just under, not quite.

Etymology: Danish, from Old Norse lítli, a definite form of lítill.

[Annie Stegg - Thumbelina]

SILVICIDE

[noun]

1. the destruction of trees.

2. any substance that kills trees or forests particularly in relation to herbicides.

Etymology: Latin silva - forest + cida - cut/kill. Similar to dendrocide.

[James R. Eads]