A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
LILLE [neuter]
[adjective]
1. small, little, slight.
2. short.
3. miniature.
4. lower case.
5. less than, just under, not quite.
Etymology: Danish, from Old Norse lítli, a definite form of lítill.
[Annie Stegg - Thumbelina]

LILLE [neuter]

[adjective]

1. small, little, slight.

2. short.

3. miniature.

4. lower case.

5. less than, just under, not quite.

Etymology: Danish, from Old Norse lítli, a definite form of lítill.

[Annie Stegg - Thumbelina]

SILVICIDE

[noun]

1. the destruction of trees.

2. any substance that kills trees or forests particularly in relation to herbicides.

Etymology: Latin silva - forest + cida - cut/kill. Similar to dendrocide.

[James R. Eads]

EXCORIATE
[verb]
1. to denounce or berate severely; flay verbally.
2. to strip off or remove the skin from; to flay.
Etymology: from late Middle English < Late Latin excoriātus (past participle of excoriāre, “to strip, skin”).
[Mark Gleason]

EXCORIATE

[verb]

1. to denounce or berate severely; flay verbally.

2. to strip off or remove the skin from; to flay.

Etymology: from late Middle English < Late Latin excoriātus (past participle of excoriāre, “to strip, skin”).

[Mark Gleason]

DILETTO
[noun]
1. beloved, loved one.
2. pleasure; delight.
3. hobby.
[adjective]
4. beloved, something or someone who is loved.
Etymology: Italian, from Latin dēlectāre “to delight”.
[Christian Schloe]

DILETTO

[noun]

1. beloved, loved one.

2. pleasure; delight.

3. hobby.

[adjective]

4. beloved, something or someone who is loved.

Etymology: Italian, from Latin dēlectāre “to delight”.

[Christian Schloe]

AASFRESSER

[noun]

scavenger; an animal that feeds on carrion.

Etymology: German, from aas (carrion, bait) + fressen (to devour, to eat).

[Lenka Simeckova - Jackals & Arabs (Franz Kafka)]

ASTROSOPHY
[noun]
Informal: &#8220;star wisdom&#8221;; knowledge of or from the stars.
Etymology: Greek prefix astro- (relating to stars) + -sophy (suffix relating to skill and wisdom).
[Brad Holland]

ASTROSOPHY

[noun]

Informal: “star wisdom”; knowledge of or from the stars.

Etymology: Greek prefix astro- (relating to stars) + -sophy (suffix relating to skill and wisdom).

[Brad Holland]

DELASSATION
[noun]
Obsolete: fatigue; weariness; physical or mental exhaustion.
Etymology: from Latin delassare, delassatum,” to tire out”; de- + lassare, “to tire”.
[Giacomo D’Ancona - Weariness]

DELASSATION

[noun]

Obsolete: fatigue; weariness; physical or mental exhaustion.

Etymology: from Latin delassare, delassatum,” to tire out”; de- + lassare, “to tire”.

[Giacomo D’Ancona - Weariness]

INVIGILATE
[verb]
1. to keep watch, especially in a controlling manner.
2. British: to keep watch over students at an examination.
Etymology: from Latin invigilātus, past participle of invigilāre, “to keep watch, stay up late”.
[Mikael Bourgouin]

INVIGILATE

[verb]

1. to keep watch, especially in a controlling manner.

2. British: to keep watch over students at an examination.

Etymology: from Latin invigilātus, past participle of invigilāre, “to keep watch, stay up late”.

[Mikael Bourgouin]

PEDUNCLE

[noun]

a flower stalk; a stalk bearing a flower or flower cluster or a fructification.

Click here for non-botanical definitions.

Etymology: from New Latin pedunculus, from Latin pedīculus “little foot”.

[Peony Yip]

SCINDERE
[verb] 
to spit up or divide.
Etymology: from Italian, from Latin scindere “to cut”.
[Maciej Wierzbicki]

SCINDERE

[verb]

to spit up or divide.

Etymology: from Italian, from Latin scindere “to cut”.

[Maciej Wierzbicki]

Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. Without books, the development of civilization would have been impossible. They are engines of change (as the poet said), windows on the world and lighthouses erected in the sea of time. They are companions, teachers, magicians, bankers of the treasures of the mind. Books are humanity in print.
Barbara W. Tuchman
ABSQUE
[preposition]
without; apart from.
Etymology: Latin.
[Shannon Bonatakis]

ABSQUE

[preposition]

without; apart from.

Etymology: Latin.

[Shannon Bonatakis]

TÖTENTANZ
[noun]
dance of death; dance of the dead; an allegorical representation of the ever-present and universal power of death.
Etymology: German - töten &#8220;to kill&#8221; + tanz &#8220;dance&#8221;.
[Adriaen Pietersz van de Venne]

TÖTENTANZ

[noun]

dance of death; dance of the dead; an allegorical representation of the ever-present and universal power of death.

Etymology: German - töten “to kill” + tanz “dance”.

[Adriaen Pietersz van de Venne]

SUPPALPATION
[noun]
1. the act of enticing by soft words; enticement.
2. gaining affection by caressing.
Etymology: from Latin suppalpari, “to caress a little”; sub, “under, a little” + palpare, “to caress”.
[John William Waterhouse]

SUPPALPATION

[noun]

1. the act of enticing by soft words; enticement.

2. gaining affection by caressing.

Etymology: from Latin suppalpari, “to caress a little”; sub, “under, a little” + palpare, “to caress”.

[John William Waterhouse]