A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles

NOCTURNALIA

[noun]

1. any night activities.

2. festival at night.

Etymologynocturne (Latin, derived from ‘nox’ - night) + -alia (suffix: items connected with the particular area of activity or interest mentioned).

[James R. Eads]

VINACEOUS

[adjective]

1. of, pertaining to, or resembling wine or grapes.

2. of the colour of red wine.

Etymology: from Late Latin vīnāceus, from Latin vīnum, “wine”.

[Alexei Antonov]

BALNEARE

[adjective]

bathing.

Etymology: from Latin balneum.

[Lee Price]

CARCANET
[noun]
1. an ornamental necklace, chain, collar; a richly decorated collar.
2. a woman’s ornamental circlet for the hair, often of gold decorated with jewels or pearls; headband.
Etymology: from Old French carcan, “collar”, perhaps from Mediaeval Latin carcannum, perhaps of Germanic origin.
[Nicholas Hilliard - The Hardwich Hall Portrait (Queen Elizabeth I of England)]

CARCANET

[noun]

1. an ornamental necklace, chain, collar; a richly decorated collar.

2. a woman’s ornamental circlet for the hair, often of gold decorated with jewels or pearls; headband.

Etymology: from Old French carcan, “collar”, perhaps from Mediaeval Latin carcannum, perhaps of Germanic origin.

[Nicholas Hilliard - The Hardwich Hall Portrait (Queen Elizabeth I of England)]

REPRISAL
[noun]
1. (in warfare) retaliation against an enemy, for injuries received, by the infliction of equal or greater injuries.
2. an act or instance of retaliation; vengeance.
3. the action or practice of using force, short of war, against another nation, to secure redress of a grievance.
4. the forcible seizure of property or subjects in retaliation.
Etymology: from Middle English reprisail, from Old French reprisaille, from Old Italian ripresaglia, from riprendere, “to recapture”, from Latin reprehendere, “to hold fast”.
[Tom Bagshaw - Drake’s Revenge]

REPRISAL

[noun]

1. (in warfare) retaliation against an enemy, for injuries received, by the infliction of equal or greater injuries.

2. an act or instance of retaliation; vengeance.

3. the action or practice of using force, short of war, against another nation, to secure redress of a grievance.

4. the forcible seizure of property or subjects in retaliation.

Etymology: from Middle English reprisail, from Old French reprisaille, from Old Italian ripresaglia, from riprendere, “to recapture”, from Latin reprehendere, “to hold fast”.

[Tom Bagshaw - Drake’s Revenge]

FLORATUS
[adjective]
embroidered with flowers; decorated with flowers; scented.
Etymology: Latin, ultimately from flōs, “flower”.
[Zhang Jingna]

FLORATUS

[adjective]

embroidered with flowers; decorated with flowers; scented.

Etymology: Latin, ultimately from flōs, “flower”.

[Zhang Jingna]

SOMNIFEROUS
[adjective]
inducing sleep; soporific.
Etymology: from Latin somnifer, from somnus, “sleep” + ferre, “to do”.
[Franciszek Żmurko]

SOMNIFEROUS

[adjective]

inducing sleep; soporific.

Etymology: from Latin somnifer, from somnus, “sleep” + ferre, “to do”.

[Franciszek Żmurko]

EUPHOBIA
[noun]
Informal: the morbid fear of hearing or receiving good news.
Etymology: from Ancient Greek εὖ (eû, “well, good”) + -φοβία (-phobía, from phóbos, “fear”). It is uncertain how eu, i.e. “good” developed into encompassing “good news”.
[Ilovedoodle - Good News is On The Way]

EUPHOBIA

[noun]

Informal: the morbid fear of hearing or receiving good news.

Etymology: from Ancient Greek εὖ (, “well, good”) + -φοβία (-phobía, from phóbos, “fear”). It is uncertain how eu, i.e. “good” developed into encompassing “good news”.

[Ilovedoodle - Good News is On The Way]

[image source]

CRYPTOZOOLOGY

[noun]

the study of evidence tending to substantiate the existence of, or the search for, creatures whose reported existence is unproved, as the Abominable Snowman or the Loch Ness monster. The discipline is traditionally viewed as a pseudoscience.

Etymology: from Greek kryptos, “hidden” + zoology; “study of animals”, literally, “study of hidden animals”.

[Vladimir Stankovic]

A fabulous photo of Roald Dahl.
[image source]

A fabulous photo of Roald Dahl.

[image source]

METAGROBOLIZE
[verb]
to mystify; to puzzle out.
Etymology: origin uncertain, thought to be from obsolete French metagraboulizer.
[Nicebleed & Kyle Cobban - The Solution]

METAGROBOLIZE

[verb]

to mystify; to puzzle out.

Etymology: origin uncertain, thought to be from obsolete French metagraboulizer.

[Nicebleed & Kyle Cobban - The Solution]

ANTHOLOGER
[noun]
1. one who collects flowers.
2. one who compiles a collection of literary works for publishing.
Etymology: Latin anthologia < Greek, literally, gathering of flowers; from anthos, “flower” + legein, “to collect”.
[John William Waterhouse]

ANTHOLOGER

[noun]

1. one who collects flowers.

2. one who compiles a collection of literary works for publishing.

Etymology: Latin anthologia < Greek, literally, gathering of flowers; from anthos, “flower” + legein, “to collect”.

[John William Waterhouse]

MERCOLEDÌ
[noun]
Wednesday; the fourth day of the week in many religious traditions, and the third day of the week in systems using the ISO 8601 norm; it follows Tuesday and precedes Thursday.
Etymology: Italian, from Latin Mercuriī diēs, variant of diēs Mercuriī (“day of Mercury”).
[Phillicia Deanell]

MERCOLEDÌ

[noun]

Wednesday; the fourth day of the week in many religious traditions, and the third day of the week in systems using the ISO 8601 norm; it follows Tuesday and precedes Thursday.

Etymology: Italian, from Latin Mercuriī diēs, variant of diēs Mercuriī (“day of Mercury”).

[Phillicia Deanell]

Picking five favorite books is like picking the five body parts you’d most like not to lose.
Neil Gaiman