A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
BIOLUMINESCENCE
[noun]
the production and emission of light by a living organism. 
Etymology: hybrid word originating from Greek bios for “living” and Latin lumen for “light”.
[Jason Courtney - Even in Snowman’s boyhood there were luminous green rabbits (Oryx & Crake)]

BIOLUMINESCENCE

[noun]

the production and emission of light by a living organism.

Etymology: hybrid word originating from Greek bios for “living” and Latin lumen for “light”.

[Jason Courtney - Even in Snowman’s boyhood there were luminous green rabbits (Oryx & Crake)]

GLEDE
[noun]
1. burning coal; an ember.
2. cinder.
Etymology: from Old English glēd. Not to be confused with Glede the bird of prey.
[Talbot Hughes - Cinderella]

GLEDE

[noun]

1. burning coal; an ember.

2. cinder.

Etymology: from Old English glēd. Not to be confused with Glede the bird of prey.

[Talbot Hughes - Cinderella]

RAMUS
[noun]
branch; a part of a tree that grows out from the trunk or from a bough.
Etymology: from Latin rāmus.
[Zen and Chic]

RAMUS

[noun]

branch; a part of a tree that grows out from the trunk or from a bough.

Etymology: from Latin rāmus.

[Zen and Chic]

TINCT
[noun]
1. to tinge or tint, as with colour.
2. Obsolete: to imbue.
[adjective]
3. tinged; coloured; flavoured.
[noun]
4. tint; tinge; colouring.
Etymology: from Latin tinctus, from tingere, “to colour”.
[Julian Callos]

TINCT

[noun]

1. to tinge or tint, as with colour.

2. Obsolete: to imbue.

[adjective]

3. tinged; coloured; flavoured.

[noun]

4. tint; tinge; colouring.

Etymology: from Latin tinctus, from tingere, “to colour”.

[Julian Callos]

CORDOLIUM
[noun]
heartfelt grief; sorrow of the heart.
Etymology: from Latin cor, “heart” + dolor, “pain, sorrow”, dolere, “to ache”.
[Jean Osborne - Grief]

CORDOLIUM

[noun]

heartfelt grief; sorrow of the heart.

Etymology: from Latin cor, “heart” + dolor, “pain, sorrow”, dolere, “to ache”.

[Jean Osborne - Grief]

FRACTUS
[adjective]
1. broken, shattered, having been broken.
2. vanquished, defeated, having been defeated.
[noun]
3. a cloud species which consists of broken shreds of cloud, like scud. Associated with cumulus, and stratus genera.
Etymology: Latin frāctus, derived from frangō, “break, fragment”.
[Jorge Monreal]

FRACTUS

[adjective]

1. broken, shattered, having been broken.

2. vanquished, defeated, having been defeated.

[noun]

3. a cloud species which consists of broken shreds of cloud, like scud. Associated with cumulus, and stratus genera.

Etymology: Latin frāctus, derived from frangō, “break, fragment”.

[Jorge Monreal]

CALLIDEMON
[noun]
beautiful demon; beautiful spirit.
Etymology: from Greek calli, from kalós, “beautiful” + demon, from daímōn, “dispenser, god, protective spirit”. Not to be confused with calodemon though they are derived from the same root words.
[Eric Fortune - The Demon Haunted World]

CALLIDEMON

[noun]

beautiful demon; beautiful spirit.

Etymology: from Greek calli, from kalós, “beautiful” + demon, from daímōn, “dispenser, god, protective spirit”. Not to be confused with calodemon though they are derived from the same root words.

[Eric Fortune - The Demon Haunted World]

UNGEZÄHMT

[adjective]

wild; untamed; feral; unsubdued.

Etymology: German.

[Angela Rizza - Wilder Things]

WAFTURE
[noun]
1. the act of passing or causing to pass easily or gently through or as if through the air.
2. a sound or odour, faintly perceived.
3. the use of movements (especially of the hands) to communicate familiar or prearranged signals.
Etymology: back formation from late Middle English waughter, “armed escort vessel” < Dutch or Low German wachter, “watchman”.
[Kris Lewis - Rose Zephyr]

WAFTURE

[noun]

1. the act of passing or causing to pass easily or gently through or as if through the air.

2. a sound or odour, faintly perceived.

3. the use of movements (especially of the hands) to communicate familiar or prearranged signals.

Etymology: back formation from late Middle English waughter, “armed escort vessel” < Dutch or Low German wachter, “watchman”.

[Kris Lewis - Rose Zephyr]

You think your pain and your heartbreak are unprecedented in the history of the world, but then you read. It was books that taught me that the things that tormented me most were the very things that connected me with all the people who were alive, or who had ever been alive.
James Baldwin

BIOPHILIA

[noun]

a love of life and the living world; the affinity of human beings for other life forms.

Etymology: first used by Erich Fromm to describe a psychological orientation of being attracted to all that is alive and vital; from Greek bios, “life” + philia, “love”.

[Vladimir Stankovic]

IGNAVIA
[noun]
1. idleness; sloth; indolence; laziness; inactivity.
2. cowardice, worthlessness.
Etymology: Italian from ignāvia.
[Lee Price]

IGNAVIA

[noun]

1. idleness; sloth; indolence; laziness; inactivity.

2. cowardice, worthlessness.

Etymology: Italian from ignāvia.

[Lee Price]

CERVINE
[adjective]
1. resembling or relating to a deer
2. of a dark yellowish-brown colour.

Etymology: from Latin cervīnus, from cervus, “a deer”.
[Liiga Smilshkalne]

CERVINE

[adjective]

1. resembling or relating to a deer

2. of a dark yellowish-brown colour.

Etymology: from Latin cervīnus, from cervus, “a deer”.

[Liiga Smilshkalne]

DISSOLUTION
[noun]
1. the act or process of resolving or dissolving into parts or elements.
2. the resulting state.
3. the undoing or breaking of a bond, tie, union, partnership, etc.
4. the breaking up of an assembly or organisation; dismissal; dispersal.
5. Government: an order issued by the head of a state terminating a parliament and necessitating a new election.
Etymology: from Middle English dissolucioun &lt; Latin dissolūtiōn-, stem of dissolūtiō, from dis-, a Latin prefix meaning “apart,” “asunder,” “away,” “utterly,” or having a privative, negative, or reversing force + solution, from Latin solūtus, “free, unfettered”, from solver, “to release”.
[Peter Gric - Dissolution of Ego]

DISSOLUTION

[noun]

1. the act or process of resolving or dissolving into parts or elements.

2. the resulting state.

3. the undoing or breaking of a bond, tie, union, partnership, etc.

4. the breaking up of an assembly or organisation; dismissal; dispersal.

5. Government: an order issued by the head of a state terminating a parliament and necessitating a new election.

Etymology: from Middle English dissolucioun < Latin dissolūtiōn-, stem of dissolūtiō, from dis-, a Latin prefix meaning “apart,” “asunder,” “away,” “utterly,” or having a privative, negative, or reversing force + solution, from Latin solūtus, “free, unfettered”, from solver, “to release”.

[Peter Gric - Dissolution of Ego]

LACKADAISICAL
[adjective]
1. without interest, enthusiasm, vigour, or determination; listless; lethargic.
2. lazy; indolent.
Etymology: from earlier lackadaisy, extended form of lackaday, alteration of alack a day, similar to alas, used as an expression of regret, sorrow, dismay, or disapproval.
[Freeminds - Lazy Day]

LACKADAISICAL

[adjective]

1. without interest, enthusiasm, vigour, or determination; listless; lethargic.

2. lazy; indolent.

Etymology: from earlier lackadaisy, extended form of lackaday, alteration of alack a day, similar to alas, used as an expression of regret, sorrow, dismay, or disapproval.

[Freeminds - Lazy Day]