A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
CONFUTE
[verb]
1. to prove (a person or thing) wrong, invalid, or mistaken; disprove.
2. to put an end to.
3. Obsolete: to confound.
Etymology: from Latin confūtāre, “to check, silence”.
[John Roddam Spencer Stanhope - Knowledge Strangling Ignorance]

CONFUTE

[verb]

1. to prove (a person or thing) wrong, invalid, or mistaken; disprove.

2. to put an end to.

3. Obsolete: to confound.

Etymology: from Latin confūtāre, “to check, silence”.

[John Roddam Spencer Stanhope - Knowledge Strangling Ignorance]

LACHRYMOSE
[adjective]
1. suggestive of or tending to cause tears; mournful. 
2. given to shedding tears readily; tearful.
Etymology: from Latin lacrimōsus, equivalent to lacrim(a), “tear”.
[Kris Lewis - Rose]

LACHRYMOSE

[adjective]

1. suggestive of or tending to cause tears; mournful. 

2. given to shedding tears readily; tearful.

Etymology: from Latin lacrimōsus, equivalent to lacrim(a), “tear”.

[Kris Lewis - Rose]

ANCILLA
[noun]
1. a sidekick who helps another to accomplish or master something difficult or complicated.
2. an aid or tool to achieve something difficult.
3. an accessory; auxiliary or adjunct.
4. Archaic: a maidservant.
5. a genus of sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the family Olividae.
Etymology: from Latin ancilla, “maid, slave-girl”.
[Artemisia Gentileschi - Judith Beheading Holofernes]

ANCILLA

[noun]

1. a sidekick who helps another to accomplish or master something difficult or complicated.

2. an aid or tool to achieve something difficult.

3. an accessory; auxiliary or adjunct.

4. Archaic: a maidservant.

5. a genus of sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the family Olividae.

Etymology: from Latin ancilla, “maid, slave-girl”.

[Artemisia Gentileschi - Judith Beheading Holofernes]

DIPSETIC
[adjective]
tending to produce thirst; causing great thirst.
Etymology: from Ancient Greek dipsitikos, “provoking thirst” < dipsan, “to thirst” < dipsa, “thirst”.
[J. Slattum]

DIPSETIC

[adjective]

tending to produce thirst; causing great thirst.

Etymology: from Ancient Greek dipsitikos, “provoking thirst” < dipsan, “to thirst” < dipsa, “thirst”.

[J. Slattum]

DEVERIUM
[noun]
duty; a moral or legal obligation; a responsibility; a task or action that someone is required to perform. 
Etymology: Latin.
[James Jean - Noah]

DEVERIUM

[noun]

duty; a moral or legal obligation; a responsibility; a task or action that someone is required to perform. 

Etymology: Latin.

[James Jean - Noah]

ANAGNORISIS
[noun]
a moment in a play or other work when a character makes a critical discovery. Anagnorisis originally meant recognition in its Greek context, not only of a person but also of what that person stood for; i.e. the hero&#8217;s sudden awareness of a situation, the realisation of things as they stood, and finally, the hero&#8217;s insight into a relationship with an often antagonistic character in Aristotelian tragedy. In his Poetics, as part of his discussion of peripeteia (a sudden change of events), Aristotle defined anagnorisis as &#8220;a change from ignorance to knowledge, producing love or hate between the persons destined by the poet for good or bad fortune&#8221; (1452a).
Etymology: from Greek anagnōrisis, from anagnōrizein, “to recognise, from ana- + gnōrizein, “to make known”; akin to Greek gnōrimos, “well-known”, gignōskein, “to come to know”.
[Anna Lea Merritt - Eve in the Garden of Eden]

ANAGNORISIS

[noun]

a moment in a play or other work when a character makes a critical discovery. Anagnorisis originally meant recognition in its Greek context, not only of a person but also of what that person stood for; i.e. the hero’s sudden awareness of a situation, the realisation of things as they stood, and finally, the hero’s insight into a relationship with an often antagonistic character in Aristotelian tragedy. In his Poetics, as part of his discussion of peripeteia (a sudden change of events), Aristotle defined anagnorisis as “a change from ignorance to knowledge, producing love or hate between the persons destined by the poet for good or bad fortune” (1452a).

Etymology: from Greek anagnōrisis, from anagnōrizein, “to recognise, from ana- + gnōrizein, “to make known”; akin to Greek gnōrimos, “well-known”, gignōskein, “to come to know”.

[Anna Lea Merritt - Eve in the Garden of Eden]

ATARAXIA
[noun]
a Greek term used by Pyrrho and Epicurus for a lucid state, characterised by freedom from worry or any other preoccupation; a state of freedom from emotional disturbance and anxiety; tranquillity; serenity.
Etymology: from Ancient Greek ἀταραξία (ataraksía), ἀ- (a-), “negative prefix” + ταράσσω (tarássō), “trouble, disturb”.
[Chalermchai Kositpipat]

ATARAXIA

[noun]

a Greek term used by Pyrrho and Epicurus for a lucid state, characterised by freedom from worry or any other preoccupation; a state of freedom from emotional disturbance and anxiety; tranquillity; serenity.

Etymology: from Ancient Greek ἀταραξία (ataraksía), - (a-), “negative prefix” + ταράσσω (tarássō), “trouble, disturb”.

[Chalermchai Kositpipat]

PALMATE

[adjective]

1. having a shape similar to that of a hand with the fingers extended; shaped like an open hand.

2. having three or more veins, leaflets, or lobes radiating from one point.

3. having webbed toes.

Etymology: from Latin palmatus, from palma, “palm”.

[James Jean]

ORAGIOUS
[adjective]
stormy; tempestuous.
Etymology: from French orageux.
[Evelyn De Morgan - The Storm Spirits]

ORAGIOUS

[adjective]

stormy; tempestuous.

Etymology: from French orageux.

[Evelyn De Morgan - The Storm Spirits]

PERICLITATE
[verb]
to endanger; to jeopardise. 
Etymology: from the past participle stem of Latin periclitari, from periculum, &#8220;experiment, risk&#8221;. 
[Alexandre Cabanel - Pandora]

PERICLITATE

[verb]

to endanger; to jeopardise. 

Etymologyfrom the past participle stem of Latin periclitari, from periculum, “experiment, risk”. 

[Alexandre Cabanel - Pandora]

PELMATOGRAM
[noun]
1. footprints.
2. an imprint of the sole of the foot, made by resting the inked foot on a sheet of paper, or by pressing the greased foot on a plaster of Paris paste.
Etymology: from Greek pelma (pelmat-), &#8220;sole of the foot&#8221;, + gramma, &#8220;a picture&#8221;.
[Helen Parsley - Footprints]

PELMATOGRAM

[noun]

1. footprints.

2. an imprint of the sole of the foot, made by resting the inked foot on a sheet of paper, or by pressing the greased foot on a plaster of Paris paste.

Etymology: from Greek pelma (pelmat-), “sole of the foot”, + gramma, “a picture”.

[Helen Parsley - Footprints]

[grammarly]

AMISTAD

[noun]

friendship; the emotions or conduct of friends; the state of being friends.

Etymology: from Latin *amicitas, *amicitatis, from amicitia, “friendship”.

[Miles Johnson]

APÉRITIF

[noun]

a small drink of alcoholic liquor taken to stimulate the appetite before a meal.

Etymology: from French, from Mediaeval Latin aperitīvus, from Latin aperīre, “to open”.

[Jeff Hayes]

NAÏVE [aka NAIVE]
[adjective]
1. having or showing unaffected simplicity of nature or absence of artificiality; unsophisticated; ingenuous.
2. having or showing a lack of experience, judgment, or information; credulous.
3. having or marked by a simple, unaffectedly direct style reflecting little or no formal training or technique.
4. not having previously been the subject of a scientific experiment, as an animal.
Etymology: French, feminine of naïf, Old French naïf, "natural, instinctive" &lt; Latin nātīvus, &#8221;native&#8221;.
[Shi Mohan]

NAÏVE [aka NAIVE]

[adjective]

1. having or showing unaffected simplicity of nature or absence of artificiality; unsophisticated; ingenuous.

2. having or showing a lack of experience, judgment, or information; credulous.

3. having or marked by a simple, unaffectedly direct style reflecting little or no formal training or technique.

4. not having previously been the subject of a scientific experiment, as an animal.

Etymology: French, feminine of naïf, Old French naïf, "natural, instinctive" < Latin nātīvus, ”native”.

[Shi Mohan]