A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles

MYCOMANIA

[noun]

an obsession with fungi; obsession with mushrooms.

Etymology: from Greek mykes, “fungus” + mania, “madness”.

[DefeatStudio]

COTHURNAL
[adjective]
of or related to tragedy or tragic acting.
Etymology: From Latin, from Greek kothornos (a thick-soled laced boot worn by tragic actors in ancient Athenian tragedies).
[Edward H. Bell]

COTHURNAL

[adjective]

of or related to tragedy or tragic acting.

Etymology: From Latin, from Greek kothornos (a thick-soled laced boot worn by tragic actors in ancient Athenian tragedies).

[Edward H. Bell]

NOIR
[noun]
1. Film noir: a genre of crime film or fiction characterised by cynicism, sexual motivation, fatalism, and moral ambiguity.
2. the colour black.
[adjective]
3. of or pertaining to film noir.
4. suggestive of danger or violence.
5. tough and bleakly pessimistic.
Etymology: from French noir, “black”; from Old French noir, neir; from Latin niger, nigrum.
[Mikael Bourgouin - Noir]

NOIR

[noun]

1. Film noir: a genre of crime film or fiction characterised by cynicism, sexual motivation, fatalism, and moral ambiguity.

2. the colour black.

[adjective]

3. of or pertaining to film noir.

4. suggestive of danger or violence.

5. tough and bleakly pessimistic.

Etymology: from French noir, “black”; from Old French noir, neir; from Latin niger, nigrum.

[Mikael Bourgouin - Noir]

PECKISH
[adjective]
1. somewhat hungry; having an appetite; the desire to eat something.
2. rather irritable.
Etmyology: Middle English pecke < Middle Dutch pecken + Middle English; Old English -isc; cognate with German -isch, Gothic -isks, Greek -iskos.
[Christian Schloe]

PECKISH

[adjective]

1. somewhat hungry; having an appetite; the desire to eat something.

2. rather irritable.

Etmyology: Middle English pecke < Middle Dutch pecken + Middle English; Old English -isc; cognate with German -isch, Gothic -isks, Greek -iskos.

[Christian Schloe]

Individual words, sounds, squiggles on paper with no meanings other than those with which our imagination can clothe them.
Jasper Fforde, The Eyre Affair

FORINSECAL

[adjective]

foreign; alien; extrinsic. 

Etymology: from Latin forinsecus, ‘from without”, derived from forās, “outside”.

[Vladimir Stankovic]

NOCTURNALIA

[noun]

1. any night activities.

2. festival at night.

Etymologynocturne (Latin, derived from ‘nox’ - night) + -alia (suffix: items connected with the particular area of activity or interest mentioned).

[James R. Eads]

VINACEOUS

[adjective]

1. of, pertaining to, or resembling wine or grapes.

2. of the colour of red wine.

Etymology: from Late Latin vīnāceus, from Latin vīnum, “wine”.

[Alexei Antonov]

BALNEARE

[adjective]

bathing.

Etymology: from Latin balneum.

[Lee Price]

CARCANET
[noun]
1. an ornamental necklace, chain, collar; a richly decorated collar.
2. a woman&#8217;s ornamental circlet for the hair, often of gold decorated with jewels or pearls; headband.
Etymology: from Old French carcan, “collar”, perhaps from Mediaeval Latin carcannum, perhaps of Germanic origin.
[Nicholas Hilliard - The Hardwich Hall Portrait (Queen Elizabeth I of England)]

CARCANET

[noun]

1. an ornamental necklace, chain, collar; a richly decorated collar.

2. a woman’s ornamental circlet for the hair, often of gold decorated with jewels or pearls; headband.

Etymology: from Old French carcan, “collar”, perhaps from Mediaeval Latin carcannum, perhaps of Germanic origin.

[Nicholas Hilliard - The Hardwich Hall Portrait (Queen Elizabeth I of England)]

REPRISAL
[noun]
1. (in warfare) retaliation against an enemy, for injuries received, by the infliction of equal or greater injuries.
2. an act or instance of retaliation; vengeance.
3. the action or practice of using force, short of war, against another nation, to secure redress of a grievance.
4. the forcible seizure of property or subjects in retaliation.
Etymology: from Middle English reprisail, from Old French reprisaille, from Old Italian ripresaglia, from riprendere, “to recapture”, from Latin reprehendere, “to hold fast”.
[Tom Bagshaw - Drake&#8217;s Revenge]

REPRISAL

[noun]

1. (in warfare) retaliation against an enemy, for injuries received, by the infliction of equal or greater injuries.

2. an act or instance of retaliation; vengeance.

3. the action or practice of using force, short of war, against another nation, to secure redress of a grievance.

4. the forcible seizure of property or subjects in retaliation.

Etymology: from Middle English reprisail, from Old French reprisaille, from Old Italian ripresaglia, from riprendere, “to recapture”, from Latin reprehendere, “to hold fast”.

[Tom Bagshaw - Drake’s Revenge]

FLORATUS
[adjective]
embroidered with flowers; decorated with flowers; scented.
Etymology: Latin, ultimately from flōs, &#8220;flower&#8221;.
[Zhang Jingna]

FLORATUS

[adjective]

embroidered with flowers; decorated with flowers; scented.

Etymology: Latin, ultimately from flōs, “flower”.

[Zhang Jingna]

SOMNIFEROUS
[adjective]
inducing sleep; soporific.
Etymology: from Latin somnifer, from somnus, “sleep” + ferre, “to do”.
[Franciszek Żmurko]

SOMNIFEROUS

[adjective]

inducing sleep; soporific.

Etymology: from Latin somnifer, from somnus, “sleep” + ferre, “to do”.

[Franciszek Żmurko]

EUPHOBIA
[noun]
Informal: the morbid fear of hearing or receiving good news.
Etymology: from Ancient Greek εὖ (eû, “well, good”) + -φοβία (-phobía, from phóbos, “fear”). It is uncertain how eu, i.e. “good” developed into encompassing “good news”.
[Ilovedoodle - Good News is On The Way]

EUPHOBIA

[noun]

Informal: the morbid fear of hearing or receiving good news.

Etymology: from Ancient Greek εὖ (, “well, good”) + -φοβία (-phobía, from phóbos, “fear”). It is uncertain how eu, i.e. “good” developed into encompassing “good news”.

[Ilovedoodle - Good News is On The Way]

[image source]