A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
INQUISITIVE
[adjective]
1. given to inquiry, research, or asking questions; eager for knowledge; intellectually curious.
2. unduly or inappropriately curious; prying.
3. eager to know.
[noun]
4. an inquisitive person.
Etymology: Late Latin inquīsītīvus, equivalent to Latin inquīsīt(us) + -īvus -ive; replacing Middle English inquisitif.
[Nicebleed]

INQUISITIVE

[adjective]

1. given to inquiry, research, or asking questions; eager for knowledge; intellectually curious.

2. unduly or inappropriately curious; prying.

3. eager to know.

[noun]

4. an inquisitive person.

Etymology: Late Latin inquīsītīvus, equivalent to Latin inquīsīt(us) + -īvus -ive; replacing Middle English inquisitif.

[Nicebleed]

NURTURE
[verb]
1. to feed and protect.
2. to support and encourage, as during the period of training or development; foster.
3. to bring up; train; educate.
4. to help grow or develop; cultivate.
[noun]
5. rearing, upbringing, training, education, or the like.
6. development.
7. something that nourishes; nourishment; food.
Etymology: from Old French norriture, from Latin nutrīre, “to nourish”.
[J. Slattum - Tomorrow’s Garden]

NURTURE

[verb]

1. to feed and protect.

2. to support and encourage, as during the period of training or development; foster.

3. to bring up; train; educate.

4. to help grow or develop; cultivate.

[noun]

5. rearing, upbringing, training, education, or the like.

6. development.

7. something that nourishes; nourishment; food.

Etymology: from Old French norriture, from Latin nutrīre, “to nourish”.

[J. Slattum - Tomorrow’s Garden]

SUPPRESS
[verb]
1. to put an end to the activities of (a person, body of persons, etc.; to prohibit; ban; restrain.
2. to do away with by or as by authority; abolish; stop (a practice, custom, etc.).
3. to keep in or repress (a feeling, smile, groan, etc.).
4. to withhold from disclosure or publication (truth, evidence, a book, names, etc.).
5. to stop or arrest (a flow, haemorrhage, cough, etc.).
Etymology: from Latin suppressus, “held down”, from supprimere, “to restrain”, from sub- “down” + premere, “to press”.
[Erin McGuire - The Handmaid’s Tale]

SUPPRESS

[verb]

1. to put an end to the activities of (a person, body of persons, etc.; to prohibit; ban; restrain.

2. to do away with by or as by authority; abolish; stop (a practice, custom, etc.).

3. to keep in or repress (a feeling, smile, groan, etc.).

4. to withhold from disclosure or publication (truth, evidence, a book, names, etc.).

5. to stop or arrest (a flow, haemorrhage, cough, etc.).

Etymology: from Latin suppressus, “held down”, from supprimere, “to restrain”, from sub- “down” + premere, “to press”.

[Erin McGuire - The Handmaid’s Tale]

MANA
[noun]
1. a supernatural force believed to dwell in a person or sacred object.
2. power; authority.
3. (Anthropology - Polynesia & Melanesia): a concept of a life force, believed to be seated in the head, and associated with high social status and ritual power; any power achieved by ritual means; prestige; authority.
Etymology: Polynesian.
[Cyril Rolando - Mana Tide]

MANA

[noun]

1. a supernatural force believed to dwell in a person or sacred object.

2. power; authority.

3. (Anthropology - Polynesia & Melanesia): a concept of a life force, believed to be seated in the head, and associated with high social status and ritual power; any power achieved by ritual means; prestige; authority.

Etymology: Polynesian.

[Cyril Rolando - Mana Tide]

ENTOMOPHILE
[noun]
one who has an intense love for insects.
Etymology: Greek entomo-, from entomos, “dissected” + -philia, from philos, “dear, beloved”.
[Kelly Louise Judd]

ENTOMOPHILE

[noun]

one who has an intense love for insects.

Etymology: Greek entomo-, from entomosdissected” + -philia, from philos, “dear, beloved”.

[Kelly Louise Judd]

DENDROPHILOUS
[adjective]
tree-loving; living in or on trees; arboreal.
Etymology: from Greek  déndron, “tree” + philos, "loving".
[yanadhyana]

DENDROPHILOUS

[adjective]

tree-loving; living in or on trees; arboreal.

Etymology: from Greek  déndron, “tree” + philos, "loving".

[yanadhyana]

SPINDRIFT

[noun]

spray swept by a violent wind along the surface of the sea.

Etymology: variant of Scots speendrift or spoondrift, from spoon (variant of obsolete spoom {of a ship} to run or scud before the wind) + drift (noun derivative of Old English drīfan, “to drive”).

[Alexei Antonov - Ocean]

SOLISEQUIOUS
[adjective]
following the course of the sun; attracted to the sun, as in solisequious plants such as sunflowers.
Etymology: from Latin sol, “sun” + sequi, “to follow”.
[Heather Watts - Sun God]

SOLISEQUIOUS

[adjective]

following the course of the sun; attracted to the sun, as in solisequious plants such as sunflowers.

Etymology: from Latin sol, “sun” + sequi, “to follow”.

[Heather Watts - Sun God]

TELAESTHESIA [aka TELESTHESIA]
[noun]
a sensibility to sights, sounds, etc., that are beyond the range of the sense organs, as in clairvoyance; response to or perception of distant stimuli by extrasensory means.
Etymology: from Greek tele, “far” + aísthēsis, “sensation, perception”.
[Chalermchai Kositpipat - Telepathy]

TELAESTHESIA [aka TELESTHESIA]

[noun]

a sensibility to sights, sounds, etc., that are beyond the range of the sense organs, as in clairvoyance; response to or perception of distant stimuli by extrasensory means.

Etymology: from Greek tele, “far” + aísthēsis, “sensation, perception”.

[Chalermchai Kositpipat - Telepathy]

JOCUND
[adjective]
cheerful; merry; gay; blithe; glad.
Etymology: from Middle English jocound < Late Latin jocundus, alteration of Latin jūcundus, “pleasant”, equivalent to ju(vāre), “to help, benefit, please, delight”.
[Victor Vercesi]

JOCUND

[adjective]

cheerful; merry; gay; blithe; glad.

Etymology: from Middle English jocound < Late Latin jocundus, alteration of Latin jūcundus, “pleasant”, equivalent to ju(vāre), “to help, benefit, please, delight”.

[Victor Vercesi]

ARBOREAL
[adjective]
1. of or pertaining to trees; treelike.
2. also, arboreous: living in or among trees.
3. Zoology: adapted for living and moving about in trees, as the limbs and skeleton of opossums, squirrels, monkeys, and apes.
Etymology: Latin arbore(us), &#8220;of trees&#8221;.
[Socar Myles]

ARBOREAL

[adjective]

1. of or pertaining to trees; treelike.

2. also, arboreous: living in or among trees.

3. Zoology: adapted for living and moving about in trees, as the limbs and skeleton of opossums, squirrels, monkeys, and apes.

Etymology: Latin arbore(us), “of trees”.

[Socar Myles]

INVENIO
[verb]
1. I find.
2. I discover.
3. I come upon.
Etymology: from Latin inveniō, from in + veniō, “come”.
[Martin Wittfooth]

INVENIO

[verb]

1. I find.

2. I discover.

3. I come upon.

Etymology: from Latin inveniō, from in + veniō, “come”.

[Martin Wittfooth]

My friend&#8217;s Animorphs series&#8230;
[back in the 90s]

My friend’s Animorphs series…

[back in the 90s]

LEPIDOPTERACIDE
[noun]
Neologism: the killing of butterflies or moths.
Etymology: from lepidoptera (from Ancient Greek lepís, “scale” + pterón, “wing”) + -cide (from Latin -cida, “cutter, killer”, from -cid, combining form of caedō, “cut, kill”).
[Agostino Arrivabene]

LEPIDOPTERACIDE

[noun]

Neologism: the killing of butterflies or moths.

Etymology: from lepidoptera (from Ancient Greek lepís, “scale” + pterón, “wing”) + -cide (from Latin -cida, “cutter, killer”, from -cid, combining form of caedō, “cut, kill”).

[Agostino Arrivabene]

I’m not young enough to know everything.
J. M. Barrie The Admirable Crichton