A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
ECDYSIS
[noun]
the scientific word for moulting in many invertebrates; i.e. the shedding of the cuticula (a term used for any of a variety of tough but flexible, non-mineral outer coverings of an organism). The cuticula of these animals often forms an inelastic exoskeleton, it is shed during growth and a new, larger covering is formed. The remnants of the old, empty exoskeleton are called exuviae.
Etymology: from Ancient Greek ἐκδύω, ekduo, “to take off, strip off”. 

ECDYSIS

[noun]

the scientific word for moulting in many invertebrates; i.e. the shedding of the cuticula (a term used for any of a variety of tough but flexible, non-mineral outer coverings of an organism). The cuticula of these animals often forms an inelastic exoskeleton, it is shed during growth and a new, larger covering is formed. The remnants of the old, empty exoskeleton are called exuviae.

Etymology: from Ancient Greek ἐκδύω, ekduo, “to take off, strip off”. 

GALACTOPHAGIA [aka GALACTOPHAGY]
[noun]
consumption of milk; milk drinking.
Etymology: Greek galacto- (combining form denoting milk, from gala, “milk” + -phagia (combining form denoting eating, from phagein, “to eat”).
[Bill Carman]

GALACTOPHAGIA [aka GALACTOPHAGY]

[noun]

consumption of milk; milk drinking.

Etymology: Greek galacto- (combining form denoting milk, from gala, “milk” + -phagia (combining form denoting eating, from phagein, “to eat”).

[Bill Carman]

SOMNORIFIC
[adjective]
inducing sleep; drowsiness; soporific.
Etymology: from Latin somnus (sleep, drowsiness) + the suffix -fic (a combining form meaning “making,” “producing,” “causing,” appearing in adjectives borrowed from Latin), blend of somnific and soporific.
[Audrey Benjaminsen - Sleeping Beauty]

SOMNORIFIC

[adjective]

inducing sleep; drowsiness; soporific.

Etymology: from Latin somnus (sleep, drowsiness) + the suffix -fic (a combining form meaning “making,” “producing,” “causing,” appearing in adjectives borrowed from Latin), blend of somnific and soporific.

[Audrey Benjaminsen - Sleeping Beauty]

Reading is that fruitful miracle of a communication in the midst of solitude.
Marcel Proust
ORNITHOMANCY
[noun]
divination from the flight and/or cries of birds.
Etymology: from Greek ornis, ornith- (bird) + manteia (prophecy).
[Angela Rizza]

ORNITHOMANCY

[noun]

divination from the flight and/or cries of birds.

Etymology: from Greek ornis, ornith- (bird) + manteia (prophecy).

[Angela Rizza]

SCHEDEL
[noun]
1. a skull.
2. a death’s head; a human skull, as symbol of death. 
Etymology: Dutch, from Middle Dutch schedele, from Old Dutch skēthila, *skeithila, “part, crown, crest, summit”, from Proto-Germanic *skaidilō, “part in the hair, top, crown, crest, summit”, from Proto-Indo-European *skÁit-, “to cut, part, separate”. Cognate with German Scheitel, “part, crest, apex”.
[Sierk van Meeuwen]

SCHEDEL

[noun]

1. a skull.

2. a death’s head; a human skull, as symbol of death. 

Etymology: Dutch, from Middle Dutch schedele, from Old Dutch skēthila, *skeithila, “part, crown, crest, summit”, from Proto-Germanic *skaidilō, “part in the hair, top, crown, crest, summit”, from Proto-Indo-European *skÁit-, “to cut, part, separate”. Cognate with German Scheitel, “part, crest, apex”.

[Sierk van Meeuwen]

CHIMAERA [aka CHIMERA]
[noun]
1. Classical Myth & Legend: a) a fire-breathing she-monster in Greek mythology having a lion’s head, a goat’s body, and a serpent’s tail, b) an imaginary monster compounded of incongruous parts.
2. an illusion or fabrication of the mind; especially an unrealisable dream.
3. Genetics: an individual, organ, or part consisting of tissues of diverse genetic constitution.
Etymology: from Latin chimaera, from Greek khimaira, “she-goat”, from khimaros, “he-goat”.
[Elisabetta Trevisan - Chimera, the Sound of Thunder]

CHIMAERA [aka CHIMERA]

[noun]

1. Classical Myth & Legend: a) a fire-breathing she-monster in Greek mythology having a lion’s head, a goat’s body, and a serpent’s tail, b) an imaginary monster compounded of incongruous parts.

2. an illusion or fabrication of the mind; especially an unrealisable dream.

3. Genetics: an individual, organ, or part consisting of tissues of diverse genetic constitution.

Etymology: from Latin chimaera, from Greek khimaira, “she-goat”, from khimaros, “he-goat”.

[Elisabetta Trevisan - Chimera, the Sound of Thunder]

ASTROPHILIA
[noun]
an intense love for celestial bodies, especially stars.
Etymology: Greek astro, “star” + philia, “love”.
[Jinyoung Shin]

ASTROPHILIA

[noun]

an intense love for celestial bodies, especially stars.

Etymology: Greek astro, “star” + philia, “love”.

[Jinyoung Shin]

DORMITION
[noun] 
1. sleep resembling death; a deep sleep; coma.
2. death resembling falling asleep, usually a peaceful and painless death.
Etymology: ultimately derived from Latin dormīre, “to sleep”.
[Christiane Vleugels]

DORMITION

[noun]

1. sleep resembling death; a deep sleep; coma.

2. death resembling falling asleep, usually a peaceful and painless death.

Etymology: ultimately derived from Latin dormīre, “to sleep”.

[Christiane Vleugels]

NEMOPHILIST
[noun]
one who is fond of forest or forest scenery; a haunter of the woods.
Etymology: from Latin nemoralis, from nemus, nemoris, “a wood or grove” + Greek philia, “love”.
[bubug]

NEMOPHILIST

[noun]

one who is fond of forest or forest scenery; a haunter of the woods.

Etymology: from Latin nemoralis, from nemus, nemoris, “a wood or grove” + Greek philia, “love”.

[bubug]

VREARE

[noun]

1. love; a profoundly tender, passionate affection for another person.

2. wanting; longing; to feel a need or a desire for; wish for.

Etymology: Aromanian, from the verb voi or Vulgar Latin *volēre < Latin volere, present active infinitive of volō. Compare Daco-Romanian vrere.

[William-Adolphe Bouguereau]

TRAGEMATOPOLIST

[noun]

1. a seller of sweets, such as candy, lollies or dried fruit.

2. confectioner; someone who makes confections (sweet preparation of fruit, candy, cakes, cookies, etc.) to sell.

Etymology: from Latin tragematopola.

[Megan Majewski]

FIRMAMENT
[noun]
the vault of heaven; the sky.
Etymology: from Late Latin firmāmentum, “sky” (considered as fixed above the earth), from Latin for “prop, support”, from firmāre, “to make firm”.
[Adam Kindwall]

FIRMAMENT

[noun]

the vault of heaven; the sky.

Etymology: from Late Latin firmāmentum, “sky” (considered as fixed above the earth), from Latin for “prop, support”, from firmāre, “to make firm”.

[Adam Kindwall]

I am a strong believer in the tyranny, the dictatorship, the absolute authority of the writer.
Philip Pullman
ESTIVALE
[noun]
French: summer - the usually warmest season of the year; between Spring and Autumn.
Etymology: from Latin aestivalis.
[Christian Schloe - A Midsummer Night&#8217;s Dream]

ESTIVALE

[noun]

French: summer - the usually warmest season of the year; between Spring and Autumn.

Etymology: from Latin aestivalis.

[Christian Schloe - A Midsummer Night’s Dream]