A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
CELO
[verb]
1. to hide, conceal, keep secret. 
2. I hide (something from someone), cover, keep a secret, conceal.
Etymology: Latin cēlō.
[Rafa Sarmento - Secrecy]

CELO

[verb]

1. to hide, conceal, keep secret. 

2. I hide (something from someone), cover, keep a secret, conceal.

Etymology: Latin cēlō.

[Rafa Sarmento - Secrecy]

BON TON
[noun]
1. sophisticated manners or breeding; good form and elegant style.
2. fashionable society.
3. something regarded as fashionably correct; the proper thing to do.
Etymology: French, literally “good tone”.
[Lié Louis Périn-Salbreux - Portrait of Madame Sophie]

BON TON

[noun]

1. sophisticated manners or breeding; good form and elegant style.

2. fashionable society.

3. something regarded as fashionably correct; the proper thing to do.

Etymology: French, literally “good tone”.

[Lié Louis Périn-Salbreux - Portrait of Madame Sophie]

PROCERUS
[adjective]
1. high, tall, lofty.
2. extended, elongated.
Etymology: Latin prōcērus.
[gaius31duke - Out There (Revisited)]

PROCERUS

[adjective]

1. high, tall, lofty.

2. extended, elongated.

Etymology: Latin prōcērus.

[gaius31duke - Out There (Revisited)]

PRIMORDIAL
[adjective]
1. constituting a beginning; giving origin to something derived or developed; original; elementary.
2. Embryology: first formed.
3. pertaining to or existing at or from the very beginning.
Etymology: from Late Latin prīmōrdiālis, “of the beginning, original”, from Latin prīmus, “first” + ōrdīrī, “to begin”.
[Freydoon Rassouli - In The Beginning]

PRIMORDIAL

[adjective]

1. constituting a beginning; giving origin to something derived or developed; original; elementary.

2. Embryology: first formed.

3. pertaining to or existing at or from the very beginning.

Etymology: from Late Latin prīmōrdiālis, “of the beginning, original”, from Latin prīmus, “first” + ōrdīrī, “to begin”.

[Freydoon Rassouli - In The Beginning]

CYBERNETICS
[noun]
the study of human control functions and of mechanical and electronic systems designed to replace them, involving the application of statistical mechanics to communication engineering.
Etymology: from Greek kubernētēs, “steersman”, from kubernan, “to steer, control”.
[Peter Gric - Android-Mind]

CYBERNETICS

[noun]

the study of human control functions and of mechanical and electronic systems designed to replace them, involving the application of statistical mechanics to communication engineering.

Etymology: from Greek kubernētēs, “steersman”, from kubernan, “to steer, control”.

[Peter Gric - Android-Mind]

CALANTHA

[noun]

Female name: beautiful flower.

Etymology: Finnish.

[Alexei Antonov]

Darren Aronofsky Adapting Futuristic ‘MaddAddam’ Book Trilogy As HBO Series
I am partially excited and partially terrified.
Atwood + Aronofsky + HBO should = excellence but sometimes the big and little screens tend to remove relevant subtleties and unnecessarily Anglocise or beautify characters to make it more palatable to its target market.

Darren Aronofsky Adapting Futuristic ‘MaddAddam’ Book Trilogy As HBO Series

I am partially excited and partially terrified.

Atwood + Aronofsky + HBO should = excellence but sometimes the big and little screens tend to remove relevant subtleties and unnecessarily Anglocise or beautify characters to make it more palatable to its target market.

ADURO
[verb]
1. I kindle, set fire to.
2. I singe, scorch, burn.
3. to set fire to, burn, singe, kindle, light. 
Etymology: Latin ad, “near, at” + uro, “to burn, consume, inflame”.
[Eric Fortune - Day of Dissonance]

ADURO

[verb]

1. I kindle, set fire to.

2. I singe, scorch, burn.

3. to set fire to, burn, singe, kindle, light. 

Etymology: Latin ad, “near, at” + uro, “to burn, consume, inflame”.

[Eric Fortune - Day of Dissonance]

AMOUREUX
[adjective] 
1. in love.
[noun] 
2. lover.
Etymology: French, from Middle French, from Old French amoreus, from Latin amorosus. Cognates include English amorous and Spanish amoroso.
[Adrian Borda - Artist In Love]

AMOUREUX

[adjective]

1. in love.

[noun]

2. lover.

Etymology: French, from Middle French, from Old French amoreus, from Latin amorosus. Cognates include English amorous and Spanish amoroso.

[Adrian Borda - Artist In Love]

INCORONATE
[adjective]
crowned.
Etymology: from Mediaeval Latin incoronatus, past participle of incoronare, “to crown”.
[Aron Wiesenfeld]

INCORONATE

[adjective]

crowned.

Etymology: from Mediaeval Latin incoronatus, past participle of incoronare, “to crown”.

[Aron Wiesenfeld]

SACCHARIFEROUS
[adjective]
containing or yielding sugar; sweet.
Etymology: sacchar-, combining form via Latin from Greek sakkharon, ultimately from Sanskrit śarkarā, “sugar”.
[Tom Bagshaw - O-Dukuro]

SACCHARIFEROUS

[adjective]

containing or yielding sugar; sweet.

Etymology: sacchar-, combining form via Latin from Greek sakkharon, ultimately from Sanskrit śarkarā, “sugar”.

[Tom Bagshaw - O-Dukuro]

BRISANCE

[noun]
the shattering or crushing effect of an explosion.
Etymology: French, from briser “to break”, ultimately of Celtic origin; compare Old Irish brissim “I break”.
[Daniel Conway - In Sight of Apocalypse]

BRISANCE

[noun]

the shattering or crushing effect of an explosion.

Etymology: French, from briser “to break”, ultimately of Celtic origin; compare Old Irish brissim “I break”.

[Daniel Conway - In Sight of Apocalypse]
CERVINE
[adjective]
1. deerlike; of or pertaining to deer.
2. of a deep tawny colour.
Etymology: from Latin cervīnus, “of, pertaining to a deer”, equivalent to cerv(us), “deer”.
[Angela Taratuta]

CERVINE

[adjective]

1. deerlike; of or pertaining to deer.

2. of a deep tawny colour.

Etymology: from Latin cervīnus, “of, pertaining to a deer”, equivalent to cerv(us), “deer”.

[Angela Taratuta]

INQUISITIVE
[adjective]
1. given to inquiry, research, or asking questions; eager for knowledge; intellectually curious.
2. unduly or inappropriately curious; prying.
3. eager to know.
[noun]
4. an inquisitive person.
Etymology: Late Latin inquīsītīvus, equivalent to Latin inquīsīt(us) + -īvus -ive; replacing Middle English inquisitif.
[Nicebleed]

INQUISITIVE

[adjective]

1. given to inquiry, research, or asking questions; eager for knowledge; intellectually curious.

2. unduly or inappropriately curious; prying.

3. eager to know.

[noun]

4. an inquisitive person.

Etymology: Late Latin inquīsītīvus, equivalent to Latin inquīsīt(us) + -īvus -ive; replacing Middle English inquisitif.

[Nicebleed]