A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
BELLICOSE
[adjective]
inclined or eager to fight; aggressively hostile; belligerent; pugnacious.
Etymology: late Middle English < Latin bellicōsus, equivalent tobellic(us), ”pertaining to war”.
[Tony Sandoval - The Polish Mermaid]

BELLICOSE

[adjective]

inclined or eager to fight; aggressively hostile; belligerent; pugnacious.

Etymology: late Middle English < Latin bellicōsus, equivalent tobellic(us), ”pertaining to war”.

[Tony Sandoval - The Polish Mermaid]

OÍCHE
[noun]
night; the time of darkness between one day to the next.
Etymology: Irish, from Old Irish aidche.
[Kelly Louise Judd]

OÍCHE

[noun]

night; the time of darkness between one day to the next.

Etymology: Irish, from Old Irish aidche.

[Kelly Louise Judd]

SCRIVEN
[verb]
to put in writing.
Etymology: back formation of scrivener, “writer”, from Middle English scriveiner, alteration of scrivein, from Anglo-French escrivein, from Vulgar Latin *scriban-, scriba, alteration of Latin scriba, “scribe”.
[Sylar113]

SCRIVEN

[verb]

to put in writing.

Etymology: back formation of scrivener, “writer”, from Middle English scriveiner, alteration of scrivein, from Anglo-French escrivein, from Vulgar Latin *scriban-, scriba, alteration of Latin scriba, “scribe”.

[Sylar113]

MALEFICIATE
[verb]
1. placed under an evil spell; especially if made impotent by sorcery.
2. to bewitch; to enchant; to charm; to affect by witchcraft or magic; cast a spell over.
Etymology: from Mediaeval Latin maleficiatus, past participle of maleficiare, “to bewitch, injure”, from Latin maleficium, “evil spell”.
[Tom Bagshaw - Evil Intent]

MALEFICIATE

[verb]

1. placed under an evil spell; especially if made impotent by sorcery.

2. to bewitch; to enchant; to charm; to affect by witchcraft or magic; cast a spell over.

Etymology: from Mediaeval Latin maleficiatus, past participle of maleficiare, “to bewitch, injure”, from Latin maleficium, “evil spell”.

[Tom Bagshaw - Evil Intent]

RHOPOGRAPHY
[noun]
painting still life; the art of depicting predominantly inanimate objects; the depiction of trivial, everyday things.
Etymology: Greek rhopos, “trivial objects, small wares, trifles” + -graphy, suffix denoting “writing, field of study”.
[Liam Liberty]

RHOPOGRAPHY

[noun]

painting still life; the art of depicting predominantly inanimate objects; the depiction of trivial, everyday things.

Etymology: Greek rhopos, “trivial objects, small wares, trifles” + -graphy, suffix denoting “writing, field of study”.

[Liam Liberty]

ENSORCELL [aka ENSORCEL]
[verb]
to bewitch; to enchant.
Etymology: from Middle French ensorceler, “to bewitch”, dissimilated variant of ensorcerer.
[Edward Burne-Jones - The Beguiling of Merlin]

ENSORCELL [aka ENSORCEL]

[verb]

to bewitch; to enchant.

Etymology: from Middle French ensorceler, “to bewitch”, dissimilated variant of ensorcerer.

[Edward Burne-Jones - The Beguiling of Merlin]

GÙSHÌ
[noun]
故 事 - story; tale; a narrative, either true or fictitious, in prose or verse, designed to interest, amuse, or instruct the hearer or reader.
Etymology: Chinese.
[Ilovedoodle - The Ocean of Story]

GÙSHÌ

[noun]

故 事 - story; tale; a narrative, either true or fictitious, in prose or verse, designed to interest, amuse, or instruct the hearer or reader.

Etymology: Chinese.

[Ilovedoodle - The Ocean of Story]

POMEGRANATE
[noun]
botanical name Punica granatum; is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree. Its fruit is often used as a recurring symbol across different cultures, e.g. in Ancient Greek mythology, the pomegranate was also known as the &#8220;fruit of the dead,&#8221; and to have sprung from the blood of Adonis whereas the Ancient Egyptians regarded the pomegranate as a symbol of prosperity and ambition.
Etymology: from mediaeval Latin pōmum, &#8220;apple&#8221; and grānātum, &#8220;seeded&#8221;.
[Benjamin A. Vierling - Pomegranates]

POMEGRANATE

[noun]

botanical name Punica granatum; is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree. Its fruit is often used as a recurring symbol across different cultures, e.g. in Ancient Greek mythology, the pomegranate was also known as the “fruit of the dead,” and to have sprung from the blood of Adonis whereas the Ancient Egyptians regarded the pomegranate as a symbol of prosperity and ambition.

Etymology: from mediaeval Latin pōmum, “apple” and grānātum, “seeded”.

[Benjamin A. Vierling - Pomegranates]

BRIO

[noun]

vigour or vivacity of style or performance.

Etymology: from Italian & Spanish brío “energy, determination” < Celtic *brīgos; compare Old Irish bríg (feminine) “power, strength, force”.

[Nelya Shenklyarska - Swan Lake]

LOCUS

[noun]

1. a place; a specific area; a position of locality, especially a centre of activity or the scene of a crime.

2. Mathematics: the set of all points whose coordinates satisfy a given equation or condition.

3. Genetics: a ixed position on a chromosome that may be occupied by one or more genes.

Etymology: Latin locus, from Old Latin stlocus from Proto-Indo-European *stel-, “to put, place, locate”.

[Andrey Maximov]

PEINDRE
[verb]
to paint.
Etymology: from Old French peindre, from Latin pingere, present active infinitive of pingō, “I paint”.
[Alexei Antonov - On the Easel]

PEINDRE

[verb]

to paint.

Etymology: from Old French peindre, from Latin pingere, present active infinitive of pingō, “I paint”.

[Alexei Antonov - On the Easel]

PHILOPHOBIA
[noun]
the fear of being in love and falling in love. The risk is usually exacerbated when a person has experienced any emotional turmoil relating to love in the past but also can be chronic phobia.
Etymology: from Greek φίλος - filos, &#8220;beloved, loving&#8221; and φόβος - phobos, &#8220;fear&#8221;.
[Sebastian Giacobino - Love Demon]

PHILOPHOBIA

[noun]

the fear of being in love and falling in love. The risk is usually exacerbated when a person has experienced any emotional turmoil relating to love in the past but also can be chronic phobia.

Etymology: from Greek φίλος - filos, “beloved, loving” and φόβος - phobos, “fear”.

[Sebastian Giacobino - Love Demon]

BAUM DES LEBENS
[noun]
tree of life; the interconnected nature of life.
Etymology: German, Baum, &#8220;tree&#8221; + des, &#8220;of&#8221; + Lebens, &#8220;life, existence&#8221;.
[Andrew Forrest - One]

BAUM DES LEBENS

[noun]

tree of life; the interconnected nature of life.

Etymology: German, Baum, “tree” + des, “of” + Lebens, “life, existence”.

[Andrew Forrest - One]

MOGWAI
[noun]
Chinese folklore: a kind of demon though to have evil intentions towards humans.
Etymology: Chinese móguǐ, 魔怪; mó derived from Sanskrit Mara, “evil beings” + guǐ, “deceased spirits or souls of the dead”.
[hoooook]

MOGWAI

[noun]

Chinese folklore: a kind of demon though to have evil intentions towards humans.

Etymology: Chinese móguǐ, 魔怪derived from Sanskrit Mara, “evil beings” + guǐ, “deceased spirits or souls of the dead”.

[hoooook]

LIEBLING

[noun]

1. darling.

2. favourite.

Etymology: German Liebe, “love” + -ling, diminuitive suffix.

[Jasmine Becket-Griffith - Princess Belle’s Royal Portrait]