A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
EXIMIOUS 
[adjective] 
distinguished; eminent; excellent. 
Etymology: from Latin eximius, from eximere, ”to take out”, from emere, ”to purchase”.
[Alexei Antonov - Early Morning Coffee]

EXIMIOUS

[adjective]

distinguished; eminent; excellent.

Etymology: from Latin eximius, from eximere, ”to take out”, from emere, ”to purchase”.

[Alexei Antonov - Early Morning Coffee]

CAMPANIFORM
[adjective]
shaped like a bell.
Etymology: from Late Latin campana, “bell” + fōrma, “form, figure”.
[yanadhyana - Bluebells Tree]

CAMPANIFORM

[adjective]

shaped like a bell.

Etymology: from Late Latin campana, “bell” + fōrma, “form, figure”.

[yanadhyana - Bluebells Tree]

INVIDIOUS
[adjective]
1. calculated to create ill will or resentment or give offense; hateful.
2. offensively or unfairly discriminating; injurious.
3. causing or tending to cause animosity, resentment, or envy.
4. envious.
Etymology: Latin invidiōsus, “envious, envied, hateful”, equivalent to invidi(a), “envy”.
[Tom Bagshaw - Lucille]

INVIDIOUS

[adjective]

1. calculated to create ill will or resentment or give offense; hateful.

2. offensively or unfairly discriminating; injurious.

3. causing or tending to cause animosity, resentment, or envy.

4. envious.

EtymologyLatin invidiōsus, “envious, envied, hateful”, equivalent to invidi(a), “envy”.

[Tom Bagshaw - Lucille]

GALAKTYKA
[noun]
galaxy; a large system of stars held together by mutual gravitation and isolated from similar systems by vast regions of space.
Etymology: Polish, ultimately derived from from Latin galaxias, from Ancient Greek γαλαξίας (galaxías, “Milky Way”), from γάλα (gala, “milk”).
[David A. Hardy]

GALAKTYKA

[noun]

galaxy; a large system of stars held together by mutual gravitation and isolated from similar systems by vast regions of space.

Etymology: Polish, ultimately derived from from Latin galaxias, from Ancient Greek γαλαξίας (galaxías, “Milky Way”), from γάλα (gala, “milk”).

[David A. Hardy]

ANTELUCAN
[adjective]
before dawn; held or being before light.
Etymology: from Latin antelucanus; ante, “before” + lux, “light”.
[Herbert James Draper - Day & the Dawnstar]

ANTELUCAN

[adjective]

before dawn; held or being before light.

Etymology: from Latin antelucanus; ante, “before” + lux, “light”.

[Herbert James Draper - Day & the Dawnstar]

ELEND
[noun]
misery; great unhappiness; extreme pain of body or mind; wretchedness; distress; woe.
Etymology: German, from Old High German elilenti.
[hoooook]

ELEND

[noun]

misery; great unhappiness; extreme pain of body or mind; wretchedness; distress; woe.

Etymology: German, from Old High German elilenti.

[hoooook]

TURBULENCE
[noun]
1. the quality or state of being turbulent; violent disorder or commotion.
2. Hydraulics: the haphazard secondary motion caused by eddies within a moving fluid.
3. Meteorology: irregular motion of the atmosphere, as that indicated by gusts and lulls in the wind.
Etymology: from Latin turbulentus, from turba, “confusion”.
[25kartinok]

TURBULENCE

[noun]

1. the quality or state of being turbulent; violent disorder or commotion.

2. Hydraulics: the haphazard secondary motion caused by eddies within a moving fluid.

3. Meteorology: irregular motion of the atmosphere, as that indicated by gusts and lulls in the wind.

Etymologyfrom Latin turbulentus, from turba, “confusion”.

[25kartinok]

FRAGILE

[adjective]

1. easily broken, shattered, or damaged; delicate; brittle; frail.

2. vulnerably delicate, as in appearance.

3. lacking in substance or force; flimsy.

Etymology: Latin fragilis, variant stem of frangere, “to break”.

[Marianne Le Carrour]

FAMELICOSE
[adjective]
often or very hungry.
Etymology: from Latin fames, “hunger” + -ose, a suffix which forms adjectives having a specified quality.
[Peter Diamond]

FAMELICOSE

[adjective]

often or very hungry.

Etymology: from Latin fames, “hunger” + -ose, a suffix which forms adjectives having a specified quality.

[Peter Diamond]

INIQUITY
[noun]
1. gross injustice or wickedness.
2. a violation of right or duty; wicked act; sin.
Etymology: from Latin inīquitās, from inīquus, “unfair”, from in-, “not” + aequus, “even, level, just, equal”.
[Stanley Lau - Wicked]

INIQUITY

[noun]

1. gross injustice or wickedness.

2. a violation of right or duty; wicked act; sin.

Etymology: from Latin inīquitās, from inīquus, “unfair”, from in-, “not” + aequus, “even, level, just, equal”.

[Stanley Lau - Wicked]

REBUS
[noun]
1. a representation of words in the form of pictures or symbols, often presented as a puzzle, for example, apex might be represented by a picture of an ape followed by a letter X.
2. Heraldry: a heraldic emblem or device that is a pictorial representation of or pun on the name of the bearer, for example, salmon fish may be used to represent the surname Salmon.
Etymology: from French rébus, from Latin rebus, ablative plural of res, “thing”.
[Ilovedoodle - Time Flies]

REBUS

[noun]

1. a representation of words in the form of pictures or symbols, often presented as a puzzle, for example, apex might be represented by a picture of an ape followed by a letter X.

2. Heraldry: a heraldic emblem or device that is a pictorial representation of or pun on the name of the bearer, for example, salmon fish may be used to represent the surname Salmon.

Etymology: from French rébus, from Latin rebus, ablative plural of res, “thing”.

[Ilovedoodle - Time Flies]

At the risk of sounding like a complete moron; are all the words you post from the English language?
Anonymous

Absolutely not a moronic question. Most of the words posted are a part of the English language but not all. The etymology usually (attempts to at least…) explains the words origin.

SEUL
[adjective]
1. lonely, alone.
2. only.
3. single.
Etymology: from Old French sol, soul, “alone”, from Latin sōlus, “alone, sole, only”.
[Daniel Danger]

SEUL

[adjective]

1. lonely, alone.

2. only.

3. single.

Etymology: from Old French sol, soul, “alone”, from Latin sōlus, “alone, sole, only”.

[Daniel Danger]

ÉLAN
[noun]
1. spirit.
2. zeal.
3. ardour.
Etymology: French, deverbal of élancer.
[Benny Andersson - Candle of Life]

ÉLAN

[noun]

1. spirit.

2. zeal.

3. ardour.

Etymology: French, deverbal of élancer.

[Benny Andersson - Candle of Life]

EXANIMATE
[adjective]
1. inanimate or lifeless.
2. spiritless; disheartened.
Etymology: Latin exanimātus (past participle of exanimāre - to deprive of life).
[Yelena Bryksenkova]

EXANIMATE

[adjective]

1. inanimate or lifeless.

2. spiritless; disheartened.

Etymology: Latin exanimātus (past participle of exanimāre - to deprive of life).

[Yelena Bryksenkova]