A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
SIMPATICO
[adjective]
1. congenial; likable; easy to get along with.
2. of like mind or temperament; compatible.
2. having attractive qualities; pleasing.
Etymology: from Italian simpatia, “sympathy”.
[Huebucket]

SIMPATICO

[adjective]

1. congenial; likable; easy to get along with.

2. of like mind or temperament; compatible.

2. having attractive qualities; pleasing.

Etymology: from Italian simpatia, “sympathy”.

[Huebucket]

FRIGUS
[noun]
1. cold, coldness, coolness, chilliness.
2. the cold of winter; winter; frost.
3. the coldness of death; death.
4. a chill, fever.
5. a cold shudder which is produced by fear a cold region, place, area or spot (figuratively).
6. inactivity, indolence, slowness (figuratively).
7. a cold reception, indifference; a chilly demeanour.
Etymology: Latin, from Proto-Indo-European*sriHgos-. Cognate with Ancient Greek ῥῖγος (rhigos).
[a-hour - The Queen]

FRIGUS

[noun]

1. cold, coldness, coolness, chilliness.

2. the cold of winter; winter; frost.

3. the coldness of death; death.

4. a chill, fever.

5. a cold shudder which is produced by fear a cold region, place, area or spot (figuratively).

6. inactivity, indolence, slowness (figuratively).

7. a cold reception, indifference; a chilly demeanour.

Etymology: Latin, from Proto-Indo-European*sriHgos-. Cognate with Ancient Greek ῥῖγος (rhigos).

[a-hour - The Queen]

UBEROUS

[adjective]

fruitful; copious; abundant; plentiful.

Etymology: Latin uber, “full, fruitful, fertile, abundant, plentiful, copious, productive”. Not to be confused with German über.

[Balthasar van der Ast]

DOLEFUL
[adjective]
sorrowful; mournful; melancholy; sadness; dreary.

Etymology: ultimately derived from Latin dolor, equivalent to dol(ēre), “to feel pain”.
[Bill Carman]

DOLEFUL

[adjective]

sorrowful; mournful; melancholy; sadness; dreary.

Etymology: ultimately derived from Latin dolor, equivalent to dol(ēre), “to feel pain”.

[Bill Carman]

EFFIGY
[noun]
1. a representation or image, especially sculptured, as on a monument.
2. a crude representation of someone disliked, used for purposes of ridicule.
Etymology: from Latin effigiēs, from effingere, “ to form, portray”, from fingere, ”to shape”.
[Angela Rizza - Crow Effigy]

EFFIGY

[noun]

1. a representation or image, especially sculptured, as on a monument.

2. a crude representation of someone disliked, used for purposes of ridicule.

Etymology: from Latin effigiēs, from effingere, “ to form, portray”, from fingere, ”to shape”.

[Angela Rizza - Crow Effigy]

HARIOLATE
[verb]
to divine; to foretell; to predict the future; to practise divination, soothsay, prophecy.
Etymology: from Latin hariolātus, “foretold, prophesied”.
[Marta Dahlig - The Oracle]

HARIOLATE

[verb]

to divine; to foretell; to predict the future; to practise divination, soothsay, prophecy.

Etymology: from Latin hariolātus, “foretold, prophesied”.

[Marta Dahlig - The Oracle]

ASTEISM
[noun]
genteel irony; a polite and ingenious manner of deriding another; polite mockery.
Etymology: from Greek asteismos, “wit, witticism,” from asteios, “of a city or town” (as opposed to “country”), from asty, “town, city,” especially “Athens.”
[Mike Koubou]

ASTEISM

[noun]

genteel irony; a polite and ingenious manner of deriding another; polite mockery.

Etymology: from Greek asteismos, “wit, witticism,” from asteios, “of a city or town” (as opposed to “country”), from asty, “town, city,” especially “Athens.”

[Mike Koubou]

INTUITION
[noun]
1. direct perception of truth, fact, etc., independent of any reasoning process; immediate apprehension.
2. a fact, truth, etc., perceived in this way.
3. a keen and quick insight.
4. the quality or ability of having such direct perception or quick insight.
5. Philosophy: a) an immediate cognition of an object not inferred or determined by a previous cognition of the same object. b) any object or truth so discerned. c) pure, untaught, noninferential knowledge.
Etymology: from Late Latin intuition, “a contemplation”, from Latin intuērī, “to gaze upon”, from tuērī, “to look at”.
[Ken Wong]

INTUITION

[noun]

1. direct perception of truth, fact, etc., independent of any reasoning process; immediate apprehension.

2. a fact, truth, etc., perceived in this way.

3. a keen and quick insight.

4. the quality or ability of having such direct perception or quick insight.

5. Philosophy: a) an immediate cognition of an object not inferred or determined by a previous cognition of the same object. b) any object or truth so discerned. c) pure, untaught, noninferential knowledge.

Etymology: from Late Latin intuition,a contemplation”, from Latin intuērī, “to gaze upon”, from tuērī, “to look at”.

[Ken Wong]

GESPENST

[noun]

spectre; spook; spirit; wraith.

Etymology: German.

[Fantasia]

EXSILIUM
[noun]
1. exile, banishment.
2. (poetic) place of exile, retreat.
3. (figuratively, in the plural) exiles; exiled people.
Etymology: from Latin exsul, “an exiled person”.
[Tomasz Alen Kopera - Exile]

EXSILIUM

[noun]

1. exile, banishment.

2. (poetic) place of exile, retreat.

3. (figuratively, in the plural) exiles; exiled people.

Etymology: from Latin exsul, “an exiled person”.

[Tomasz Alen Kopera - Exile]

ELEGY
[noun]
1. a mournful, melancholy, or plaintive poem, especially a funeral song or a lament for the dead.
2. a poem written in elegiac meter.
3. a sad or mournful musical composition.
Etymology: from Latin elegīa < Greek elegeía, originally neuter plural of elegeîos, “elegiac”, equivalent to éleg(os), “a lament”.
[Lenka Simeckova]

ELEGY

[noun]

1. a mournful, melancholy, or plaintive poem, especially a funeral song or a lament for the dead.

2. a poem written in elegiac meter.

3. a sad or mournful musical composition.

Etymology: from Latin elegīa < Greek elegeía, originally neuter plural of elegeîos, “elegiac”, equivalent to éleg(os), “a lament”.

[Lenka Simeckova]

OOIDAL
[adjective]
shaped like an egg; oolitic.
Etymology: derived from the Greek oion, &#8220;egg&#8221;.
[Vladimir Kush]

OOIDAL

[adjective]

shaped like an egg; oolitic.

Etymology: derived from the Greek oion, “egg”.

[Vladimir Kush]

MORIOR
[verb]
1. to die, wither away, decay. 
2. I die.
3. I wither; I decay.
Etymology: Latin, from Proto-Indo-European *mer- “to die”.
[noiaillustration]

MORIOR

[verb]

1. to die, wither away, decay. 

2. I die.

3. I wither; I decay.

Etymology: Latin, from Proto-Indo-European *mer- “to die”.

[noiaillustration]

TOURNESOL
[noun]
sunflower; any of various composite plants of the genus Helianthus, as H. annuus, having showy, yellow-rayed flower heads often 12 inches (30&#160;cm) wide, and edible seeds that yield an oil with a wide variety of uses.
Etymology: French, from tourner (from Old French torner, from Latin tornāre, present active infinitive of tornō, “turn” + sol (from Latin sol, “sun”).
[Oscar-Claude Monet]

TOURNESOL

[noun]

sunflower; any of various composite plants of the genus Helianthus, as H. annuus, having showy, yellow-rayed flower heads often 12 inches (30 cm) wide, and edible seeds that yield an oil with a wide variety of uses.

Etymology: French, from tourner (from Old French torner, from Latin tornāre, present active infinitive of tornō, “turn” + sol (from Latin sol, “sun”).

[Oscar-Claude Monet]

URINATOR 
[noun] 
one who dives under water in search of something, as for pearls; a diver. 
Etymology: from Latin urinari - to plunge under water, to dive.
[Elisabetta Trevisan]

URINATOR 

[noun] 
one who dives under water in search of something, as for pearls; a diver. 

Etymology: from Latin urinari - to plunge under water, to dive.

[Elisabetta Trevisan]