A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
ALAMANIA
[noun]
Informal: an intense obsession with wings or the desire to possess wings.
Etymology: from Latin āla, “wing” + Greek mania, “madness”.
[Christian Schloe]

ALAMANIA

[noun]

Informal: an intense obsession with wings or the desire to possess wings.

Etymology: from Latin āla, “wing” + Greek mania, “madness”.

[Christian Schloe]

FORTITUDE
[noun]
mental and emotional strength in facing difficulty, adversity, danger, or temptation courageously.
Etymology: from Middle English < Latin fortitūdō , “strength, firmness, courage”, equivalent to forti(s), “strong” + -tūdō, ”-tude” - a suffix appearing in abstract nouns.
[Chris Rahn - Path of Bravery]

FORTITUDE

[noun]

mental and emotional strength in facing difficulty, adversity, danger, or temptation courageously.

Etymology: from Middle English < Latin fortitūdō , “strength, firmness, courage”, equivalent to forti(s), “strong” + -tūdō, ”-tude” - a suffix appearing in abstract nouns.

[Chris Rahn - Path of Bravery]

FALCATE
[adjective]
curved like a scythe or sickle; hooked; falciform.
Etymology: from Latin falcātus, from falx, “sickle”.
[Gabriel Paulo]

FALCATE

[adjective]

curved like a scythe or sickle; hooked; falciform.

Etymology: from Latin falcātus, from falx, “sickle”.

[Gabriel Paulo]

TALARIA
[noun]
Roman mythology: winged sandals as worn by certain gods and goddesses, especially Mercury.
Etymology: from Latin, from tālāris, “belonging to the ankle”, from talus, “ankle”.
[Evelyn De Morgan - Mercury]

TALARIA

[noun]

Roman mythology: winged sandals as worn by certain gods and goddesses, especially Mercury.

Etymology: from Latin, from tālāris, “belonging to the ankle”, from talus, “ankle”.

[Evelyn De Morgan - Mercury]

IRENIC
[adjective]
tending to promote peace or reconciliation; peaceful or conciliatory.
Etymology: from Greek eirēnikós, equivalent to eirḗn(ē), &#8220;peace&#8221;.
[yuumei - Inner Sanctuary]

IRENIC

[adjective]

tending to promote peace or reconciliation; peaceful or conciliatory.

Etymology: from Greek eirēnikós, equivalent to eirḗn(ē), “peace”.

[yuumei - Inner Sanctuary]

WORRICOW
[noun]
1. scarecrow; an object made to resemble a human figure, set up to scare birds away from a field where crops are growing.
2. hobgoblin; bugaboo; devil.
3. a frightening-looking person.
Etymology: from worry (Middle English weryen, werwen, wyrwyn, “to strangle, bite, harass”, Old English wyrgan, “to strangle”; cognate with German würgen) + cow (Old Scots for “goblin”).
[Michael Kutsche]

WORRICOW

[noun]

1. scarecrow; an object made to resemble a human figure, set up to scare birds away from a field where crops are growing.

2. hobgoblin; bugaboo; devil.

3. a frightening-looking person.

Etymology: from worry (Middle English weryen, werwen, wyrwyn, “to strangle, bite, harass”, Old English wyrgan, “to strangle”; cognate with German würgen) + cow (Old Scots for “goblin”).

[Michael Kutsche]

AURULENT

[adjective]

golden in colour.

Etymology: from Latin aurulentus, “golden”, from aurum, “gold”.

[Cory Godbey - The Golden Apples]

LUNACY
[noun]
1. insanity; mental disorder.
2. intermittent insanity, formerly believed to be related to phases of the moon.
3. extreme foolishness or an instance of it.
4. Law: unsoundness of mind sufficient to incapacitate one for civil transactions.
Etymology: lunatic (from Middle English lunatik &lt; Old French lunatique &lt; Late Latin lūnāticus, “moonstruck”, from Latin lūna, “the moon”) + -acy (a suffix of nouns of quality, state, office, etc., from Latin -ācia, -ātia).
[Lenka Simeckova - Janitor of Lunacy]

LUNACY

[noun]

1. insanity; mental disorder.

2. intermittent insanity, formerly believed to be related to phases of the moon.

3. extreme foolishness or an instance of it.

4. Law: unsoundness of mind sufficient to incapacitate one for civil transactions.

Etymology: lunatic (from Middle English lunatik < Old French lunatique < Late Latin lūnāticus, “moonstruck”, from Latin lūna, “the moon”) + -acy (a suffix of nouns of quality, state, office, etc., from Latin -ācia, -ātia).

[Lenka Simeckova - Janitor of Lunacy]

ASTROPHILE
[noun]
a person strongly attracted to knowledge about the stars; a person attracted to stars and other celestial objects.
Etymology: Greek astro, “star” + -phile, from philos, “loving”.
[Duy Huynh]

ASTROPHILE

[noun]

a person strongly attracted to knowledge about the stars; a person attracted to stars and other celestial objects.

Etymology: Greek astro, “star” + -phile, from philos, “loving”.

[Duy Huynh]

ESTRANGE
[verb]
1. to turn away in feeling or affection; make unfriendly or hostile; alienate the affections of.
2. to remove to or keep at a distance.
3. to divert from the original use or possessor.
4. separated and living apart from one’s spouse.
Etymology: from Middle French, Old French estranger; cognate with Portuguese estranhar, Spanish estrañar, Italian straniare &lt; Mediaeval Latin exstrāneāre, “to treat as a stranger”.
[Jérémie Fleury - Edward Scissorhands]

ESTRANGE

[verb]

1. to turn away in feeling or affection; make unfriendly or hostile; alienate the affections of.

2. to remove to or keep at a distance.

3. to divert from the original use or possessor.

4. separated and living apart from one’s spouse.

Etymology: from Middle French, Old French estranger; cognate with Portuguese estranhar, Spanish estrañar, Italian straniare < Mediaeval Latin exstrāneāre, “to treat as a stranger”.

[Jérémie Fleury - Edward Scissorhands]

MYCOLOGY
[noun]
a branch of biology concerned with the study of fungi, including their genetic and biochemical properties, their taxonomy and their use to humans as a source for tinder, medicinals (e.g.: penicillin), food (e.g.: beer, wine, cheese, edible mushrooms) and entheogens, as well as their dangers, such as poisoning and infection.
Etymology: from the Greek μύκης, mukēs, meaning “fungus” + -λογία, -logía, from lógos, “account, explanation, narrative”.
[flowwwer]

MYCOLOGY

[noun]

a branch of biology concerned with the study of fungi, including their genetic and biochemical properties, their taxonomy and their use to humans as a source for tinder, medicinals (e.g.: penicillin), food (e.g.: beer, wine, cheese, edible mushrooms) and entheogens, as well as their dangers, such as poisoning and infection.

Etymology: from the Greek μύκης, mukēs, meaning “fungus” + -λογία, -logía, from lógos, “account, explanation, narrative”.

[flowwwer]

GENETRIX
[noun]
1. mother.
2. female ancestor; ancestress.
Etymology: Latin from the stem of gignere, &#8220;to beget&#8221;.
[Tobias Kwan]

GENETRIX

[noun]

1. mother.

2. female ancestor; ancestress.

Etymology: Latin from the stem of gignere, “to beget”.

[Tobias Kwan]

CONFUSTICATE
[verb]
Slang: to confuse, confound or perplex; bewilder.
Etymology: first markedly noticed in J.R.R. Tolkien&#8217;s The Hobbit; a pseudo-Latinism formed from English word confuse.
[Abigail Larson - Advice from a Caterpillar]

CONFUSTICATE

[verb]

Slang: to confuse, confound or perplex; bewilder.

Etymology: first markedly noticed in J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit; a pseudo-Latinism formed from English word confuse.

[Abigail Larson - Advice from a Caterpillar]

Words, I think, are such unpredictable creatures.
No gun, no sword, no army or king will ever be more powerful than a sentence. Swords may cut and kill, but words will stab and stay, burying themselves in our bones to become corpses we carry into the future, all the time digging and failing to rip their skeletons from our flesh.
Tahereh Mafi, Ignite Me (via sad-plath)