A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles

CALANTHA

[noun]

Female name: beautiful flower.

Etymology: Finnish.

[Alexei Antonov]

Darren Aronofsky Adapting Futuristic ‘MaddAddam’ Book Trilogy As HBO Series
I am partially excited and partially terrified.
Atwood + Aronofsky + HBO should = excellence but sometimes the big and little screens tend to remove relevant subtleties and unnecessarily Anglocise or beautify characters to make it more palatable to its target market.

Darren Aronofsky Adapting Futuristic ‘MaddAddam’ Book Trilogy As HBO Series

I am partially excited and partially terrified.

Atwood + Aronofsky + HBO should = excellence but sometimes the big and little screens tend to remove relevant subtleties and unnecessarily Anglocise or beautify characters to make it more palatable to its target market.

ADURO
[verb]
1. I kindle, set fire to.
2. I singe, scorch, burn.
3. to set fire to, burn, singe, kindle, light. 
Etymology: Latin ad, “near, at” + uro, “to burn, consume, inflame”.
[Eric Fortune - Day of Dissonance]

ADURO

[verb]

1. I kindle, set fire to.

2. I singe, scorch, burn.

3. to set fire to, burn, singe, kindle, light. 

Etymology: Latin ad, “near, at” + uro, “to burn, consume, inflame”.

[Eric Fortune - Day of Dissonance]

AMOUREUX
[adjective] 
1. in love.
[noun] 
2. lover.
Etymology: French, from Middle French, from Old French amoreus, from Latin amorosus. Cognates include English amorous and Spanish amoroso.
[Adrian Borda - Artist In Love]

AMOUREUX

[adjective]

1. in love.

[noun]

2. lover.

Etymology: French, from Middle French, from Old French amoreus, from Latin amorosus. Cognates include English amorous and Spanish amoroso.

[Adrian Borda - Artist In Love]

INCORONATE
[adjective]
crowned.
Etymology: from Mediaeval Latin incoronatus, past participle of incoronare, “to crown”.
[Aron Wiesenfeld]

INCORONATE

[adjective]

crowned.

Etymology: from Mediaeval Latin incoronatus, past participle of incoronare, “to crown”.

[Aron Wiesenfeld]

SACCHARIFEROUS
[adjective]
containing or yielding sugar; sweet.
Etymology: sacchar-, combining form via Latin from Greek sakkharon, ultimately from Sanskrit śarkarā, “sugar”.
[Tom Bagshaw - O-Dukuro]

SACCHARIFEROUS

[adjective]

containing or yielding sugar; sweet.

Etymology: sacchar-, combining form via Latin from Greek sakkharon, ultimately from Sanskrit śarkarā, “sugar”.

[Tom Bagshaw - O-Dukuro]

BRISANCE

[noun]
the shattering or crushing effect of an explosion.
Etymology: French, from briser “to break”, ultimately of Celtic origin; compare Old Irish brissim “I break”.
[Daniel Conway - In Sight of Apocalypse]

BRISANCE

[noun]

the shattering or crushing effect of an explosion.

Etymology: French, from briser “to break”, ultimately of Celtic origin; compare Old Irish brissim “I break”.

[Daniel Conway - In Sight of Apocalypse]
CERVINE
[adjective]
1. deerlike; of or pertaining to deer.
2. of a deep tawny colour.
Etymology: from Latin cervīnus, “of, pertaining to a deer”, equivalent to cerv(us), “deer”.
[Angela Taratuta]

CERVINE

[adjective]

1. deerlike; of or pertaining to deer.

2. of a deep tawny colour.

Etymology: from Latin cervīnus, “of, pertaining to a deer”, equivalent to cerv(us), “deer”.

[Angela Taratuta]

INQUISITIVE
[adjective]
1. given to inquiry, research, or asking questions; eager for knowledge; intellectually curious.
2. unduly or inappropriately curious; prying.
3. eager to know.
[noun]
4. an inquisitive person.
Etymology: Late Latin inquīsītīvus, equivalent to Latin inquīsīt(us) + -īvus -ive; replacing Middle English inquisitif.
[Nicebleed]

INQUISITIVE

[adjective]

1. given to inquiry, research, or asking questions; eager for knowledge; intellectually curious.

2. unduly or inappropriately curious; prying.

3. eager to know.

[noun]

4. an inquisitive person.

Etymology: Late Latin inquīsītīvus, equivalent to Latin inquīsīt(us) + -īvus -ive; replacing Middle English inquisitif.

[Nicebleed]

NURTURE
[verb]
1. to feed and protect.
2. to support and encourage, as during the period of training or development; foster.
3. to bring up; train; educate.
4. to help grow or develop; cultivate.
[noun]
5. rearing, upbringing, training, education, or the like.
6. development.
7. something that nourishes; nourishment; food.
Etymology: from Old French norriture, from Latin nutrīre, “to nourish”.
[J. Slattum - Tomorrow’s Garden]

NURTURE

[verb]

1. to feed and protect.

2. to support and encourage, as during the period of training or development; foster.

3. to bring up; train; educate.

4. to help grow or develop; cultivate.

[noun]

5. rearing, upbringing, training, education, or the like.

6. development.

7. something that nourishes; nourishment; food.

Etymology: from Old French norriture, from Latin nutrīre, “to nourish”.

[J. Slattum - Tomorrow’s Garden]

SUPPRESS
[verb]
1. to put an end to the activities of (a person, body of persons, etc.; to prohibit; ban; restrain.
2. to do away with by or as by authority; abolish; stop (a practice, custom, etc.).
3. to keep in or repress (a feeling, smile, groan, etc.).
4. to withhold from disclosure or publication (truth, evidence, a book, names, etc.).
5. to stop or arrest (a flow, haemorrhage, cough, etc.).
Etymology: from Latin suppressus, “held down”, from supprimere, “to restrain”, from sub- “down” + premere, “to press”.
[Erin McGuire - The Handmaid’s Tale]

SUPPRESS

[verb]

1. to put an end to the activities of (a person, body of persons, etc.; to prohibit; ban; restrain.

2. to do away with by or as by authority; abolish; stop (a practice, custom, etc.).

3. to keep in or repress (a feeling, smile, groan, etc.).

4. to withhold from disclosure or publication (truth, evidence, a book, names, etc.).

5. to stop or arrest (a flow, haemorrhage, cough, etc.).

Etymology: from Latin suppressus, “held down”, from supprimere, “to restrain”, from sub- “down” + premere, “to press”.

[Erin McGuire - The Handmaid’s Tale]

MANA
[noun]
1. a supernatural force believed to dwell in a person or sacred object.
2. power; authority.
3. (Anthropology - Polynesia & Melanesia): a concept of a life force, believed to be seated in the head, and associated with high social status and ritual power; any power achieved by ritual means; prestige; authority.
Etymology: Polynesian.
[Cyril Rolando - Mana Tide]

MANA

[noun]

1. a supernatural force believed to dwell in a person or sacred object.

2. power; authority.

3. (Anthropology - Polynesia & Melanesia): a concept of a life force, believed to be seated in the head, and associated with high social status and ritual power; any power achieved by ritual means; prestige; authority.

Etymology: Polynesian.

[Cyril Rolando - Mana Tide]

ENTOMOPHILE
[noun]
one who has an intense love for insects.
Etymology: Greek entomo-, from entomos, “dissected” + -philia, from philos, “dear, beloved”.
[Kelly Louise Judd]

ENTOMOPHILE

[noun]

one who has an intense love for insects.

Etymology: Greek entomo-, from entomosdissected” + -philia, from philos, “dear, beloved”.

[Kelly Louise Judd]

DENDROPHILOUS
[adjective]
tree-loving; living in or on trees; arboreal.
Etymology: from Greek  déndron, “tree” + philos, "loving".
[yanadhyana]

DENDROPHILOUS

[adjective]

tree-loving; living in or on trees; arboreal.

Etymology: from Greek  déndron, “tree” + philos, "loving".

[yanadhyana]