A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
DESIDERIUM
[noun]
1. longing, desire, wish.
2. grief, regret.
3. need, necessity.
4. (In plural) pleasures, desires.
Etymology: Latin from dēsīderō, “want, desire, wish for; miss, lack, need”.
[bubug]

DESIDERIUM

[noun]

1. longing, desire, wish.

2. grief, regret.

3. need, necessity.

4. (In plural) pleasures, desires.

Etymology: Latin from dēsīderō, “want, desire, wish for; miss, lack, need”.

[bubug]

JENTACULAR
[adjective]
of or pertaining to a breakfast taken early in the morning, or immediately on getting up.
Etymology: from Latin ientaculum, “a breakfast taken immediately on getting up”.
[Lee Price]

JENTACULAR

[adjective]

of or pertaining to a breakfast taken early in the morning, or immediately on getting up.

Etymology: from Latin ientaculum, “a breakfast taken immediately on getting up”.

[Lee Price]

LUCTIFEROUS

[adjective]

mournful; sad and sorry.

Etymology: from Latin luctifer, “mournful”, from luctus, “sorrow” + -fer from -ferous, “having, bearing, containing”.

[Vladimir Stankovic]

POLLINIFEROUS

[adjective]

1. producing or bearing pollen.

2. fitted for carrying pollen.

Etymology: ultimately from Latin pollen, “powder”; compare Greek palē, “pollen”.

[Alexei Antonov]

RUDERAL
[adjective]
1. (of a plant) growing in waste places, along roadsides or in rubbish; growing where the natural vegetational cover has been disturbed by humans.
2. amongst rubbish.
[noun]
3. a ruderal plant.
Etymology: from Neo-Latin rūderālis, equivalent to Latin rūder-, stem of rūdus, “broken stone, rubble”.
[Martin Wittfooth]

RUDERAL

[adjective]

1. (of a plant) growing in waste places, along roadsides or in rubbish; growing where the natural vegetational cover has been disturbed by humans.

2. amongst rubbish.

[noun]

3. a ruderal plant.

Etymology: from Neo-Latin rūderālis, equivalent to Latin rūder-, stem of rūdus, “broken stone, rubble”.

[Martin Wittfooth]

APOCOLOCYNTOSIS

[noun]

extravagant or absurdly uncritical glorification; the act of turning into a pumpkin; becoming a gourd.

Etymology: originally derived from The Apocolocyntosis (divi) Claudii, literally The Gourdification of (the Divine) Claudius,  a political satire on the Roman emperor Claudius, most likely written by Seneca the Younger. The title plays upon “apotheosis”, the process by which dead Roman emperors were recognised as gods. “Apocolocyntosis” is Latinised Greek, i.e. Ἀποκολοκύντωσις, “Gourdification”.

[replaceface]

APPETITION
[noun]
desire; a longing for, or seeking after, something.
Etymology: from Latin appetītiō, “a longing for or desire”.
[Erika Steiskal]

APPETITION

[noun]

desire; a longing for, or seeking after, something.

Etymologyfrom Latin appetītiō, “a longing for or desire”.

[Erika Steiskal]

SOPITE
[verb]
to put to sleep; to quiet.
Etymology: from Latin sopitus, past participle of sopire, “to put to sleep”; akin to sopor, “a sleeping draught, a heavy sleep”.
[Tom Bagshaw - Lullaby]

SOPITE

[verb]

to put to sleep; to quiet.

Etymology: from Latin sopitus, past participle of sopire, “to put to sleep”; akin to sopor, “a sleeping draught, a heavy sleep”.

[Tom Bagshaw - Lullaby]

I begin to long for some little language such as lovers use, broken words, inarticulate words, like the shuffling of feet on pavement.
Virginia Woolf, The Waves
CONTRETEMPS
[noun]
an inopportune occurrence; an embarrassing mischance; a hitch.
Etymology: from French, from contre, “against” + temps, “time”, from Latin tempus.
[image source]

CONTRETEMPS

[noun]

an inopportune occurrence; an embarrassing mischance; a hitch.

Etymology: from French, from contre, “against” + temps, “time”, from Latin tempus.

[image source]

SAPIENCE
[noun] 
the state of having or showing great wisdom or sound judgment.
Etymology: from Old French sapience, from Latin sapientia.
[J. Slattum - As Above, So Below]

SAPIENCE

[noun]

the state of having or showing great wisdom or sound judgment.

Etymology: from Old French sapience, from Latin sapientia.

[J. Slattum - As Above, So Below]

PEDATE
[adjective]
1. having a foot or feet.
2. resembling a foot.
3. having divisions like toes.
4. Botany: (of a leaf) palmately parted or divided with the lateral lobes or divisions cleft or divided.
Etymology: from Latin pedātus, “equipped with feet”, from pēs, “foot”.
[James Jean]

PEDATE

[adjective]

1. having a foot or feet.

2. resembling a foot.

3. having divisions like toes.

4. Botany: (of a leaf) palmately parted or divided with the lateral lobes or divisions cleft or divided.

Etymology: from Latin pedātus, “equipped with feet”, from pēs, “foot”.

[James Jean]

CADUCUS
[adjective]
1. that falls or has fallen, falling, collapsing, drooping.
2. that easily falls, inclined to fall.
3. devoted to death, destined to die, doomed.
4. Figuratively: frail, fleeting, perishable, transitory; vain, futile.
5. Law: lapsed, vacant, escheatable, caducary.
Etymology: from Latin cadūcus, from cadō, “I fall”.
[Eric Armusik - Flight of Icarus]

CADUCUS

[adjective]

1. that falls or has fallen, falling, collapsing, drooping.

2. that easily falls, inclined to fall.

3. devoted to death, destined to die, doomed.

4. Figuratively: frail, fleeting, perishable, transitory; vain, futile.

5. Law: lapsed, vacant, escheatable, caducary.

Etymology: from Latin cadūcus, from cadō, “I fall”.

[Eric Armusik - Flight of Icarus]

REPLICANT
[noun]
1. (in science fiction) a genetically engineered or artificial being created as an exact replica of a particular human being.
2. one who replies.
Etymology: science fiction usage derived from Ridley Scott’s 1982 film Blade Runner, an adaption of Philip K. Dick’s novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Ultimately derived from Latin replicare, “to copy”.
[Jon Larriva]

REPLICANT

[noun]

1. (in science fiction) a genetically engineered or artificial being created as an exact replica of a particular human being.

2. one who replies.

Etymology: science fiction usage derived from Ridley Scott’s 1982 film Blade Runner, an adaption of Philip K. Dick’s novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Ultimately derived from Latin replicare, “to copy”.

[Jon Larriva]

EXONERATE
[verb]
1. to clear, as of an accusation; free from guilt or blame; exculpate.
2. to relieve, as from an obligation, duty, or task.

Etymology: from late Middle English < Latin exonerātus (past participle of exonerāre, “to unburden, discharge”), equivalent to ex-, prefix for “out of, without” + oner- (stem of onus), “a burden”.
[Jenny Dolfen - Forgiveness]

EXONERATE

[verb]

1. to clear, as of an accusation; free from guilt or blame; exculpate.

2. to relieve, as from an obligation, duty, or task.

Etymology: from late Middle English < Latin exonerātus (past participle of exonerāre, “to unburden, discharge”), equivalent to ex-, prefix for “out of, without” + oner- (stem of onus), “a burden”.

[Jenny Dolfen - Forgiveness]