A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
ABSQUE
[preposition]
without; apart from.
Etymology: Latin.
[Shannon Bonatakis]

ABSQUE

[preposition]

without; apart from.

Etymology: Latin.

[Shannon Bonatakis]

TÖTENTANZ
[noun]
dance of death; dance of the dead; an allegorical representation of the ever-present and universal power of death.
Etymology: German - töten “to kill” + tanz “dance”.
[Adriaen Pietersz van de Venne]

TÖTENTANZ

[noun]

dance of death; dance of the dead; an allegorical representation of the ever-present and universal power of death.

Etymology: German - töten “to kill” + tanz “dance”.

[Adriaen Pietersz van de Venne]

SUPPALPATION
[noun]
1. the act of enticing by soft words; enticement.
2. gaining affection by caressing.
Etymology: from Latin suppalpari, “to caress a little”; sub, “under, a little” + palpare, “to caress”.
[John William Waterhouse]

SUPPALPATION

[noun]

1. the act of enticing by soft words; enticement.

2. gaining affection by caressing.

Etymology: from Latin suppalpari, “to caress a little”; sub, “under, a little” + palpare, “to caress”.

[John William Waterhouse]

SOLLERS
[noun]
1. skilled, skillful, clever, dexterous, adroit, expert.
2. ingenious, sagacious, intelligent, inventive.
Etymology: Latin.
Bryan Larsen - Retrospection (Athena)

SOLLERS

[noun]

1. skilled, skillful, clever, dexterous, adroit, expert.

2. ingenious, sagacious, intelligent, inventive.

Etymology: Latin.

Bryan Larsen - Retrospection (Athena)

USTULATION
[noun]
1. the act of scorching or burning.
2. Pharmacology: the roasting or drying of moist substances.
Etymology: from Late Latin ustulāre, from Latin ūrere, “to burn”.
[Lenka Simeckova]

USTULATION

[noun]

1. the act of scorching or burning.

2. Pharmacology: the roasting or drying of moist substances.

Etymology: from Late Latin ustulāre, from Latin ūrere, “to burn”.

[Lenka Simeckova]

IMPOISON
[noun]
1. an obsolete word for poisoner; a person who poisons something or someone.
2. to poison; to imbitter; to impair.
Etymology: from Latin im- (prefix for “in, into”) + poison (from Old French puison “potion”, from Latin pōtiō “a drink”, especially a poisonous one, from pōtāre “to drink”).
[Harvey Tolibao]

IMPOISON

[noun]

1. an obsolete word for poisoner; a person who poisons something or someone.

2. to poison; to imbitter; to impair.

Etymology: from Latin im- (prefix for “in, into”) + poison (from Old French puison “potion”, from Latin pōtiō “a drink”, especially a poisonous one, from pōtāre “to drink”).

[Harvey Tolibao]

PREVENANCY
[noun]
courteous anticipation of others’ wishes; the act of anticipating another’s wishes, desires, etc., in the way of favour or courtesy; hence, civility; obligingness.
Etymology: from Latin praevenīre, present active infinitive of praeveniō, “anticipate”.
[bluefooted]

PREVENANCY

[noun]

courteous anticipation of others’ wishes; the act of anticipating another’s wishes, desires, etc., in the way of favour or courtesy; hence, civility; obligingness.

Etymology: from Latin praevenīre, present active infinitive of praeveniō, “anticipate”.

[bluefooted]

ECDYSIS
[noun]
the scientific word for moulting in many invertebrates; i.e. the shedding of the cuticula (a term used for any of a variety of tough but flexible, non-mineral outer coverings of an organism). The cuticula of these animals often forms an inelastic exoskeleton, it is shed during growth and a new, larger covering is formed. The remnants of the old, empty exoskeleton are called exuviae.
Etymology: from Ancient Greek ἐκδύω, ekduo, “to take off, strip off”. 

ECDYSIS

[noun]

the scientific word for moulting in many invertebrates; i.e. the shedding of the cuticula (a term used for any of a variety of tough but flexible, non-mineral outer coverings of an organism). The cuticula of these animals often forms an inelastic exoskeleton, it is shed during growth and a new, larger covering is formed. The remnants of the old, empty exoskeleton are called exuviae.

Etymology: from Ancient Greek ἐκδύω, ekduo, “to take off, strip off”. 

GALACTOPHAGIA [aka GALACTOPHAGY]
[noun]
consumption of milk; milk drinking.
Etymology: Greek galacto- (combining form denoting milk, from gala, “milk” + -phagia (combining form denoting eating, from phagein, “to eat”).
[Bill Carman]

GALACTOPHAGIA [aka GALACTOPHAGY]

[noun]

consumption of milk; milk drinking.

Etymology: Greek galacto- (combining form denoting milk, from gala, “milk” + -phagia (combining form denoting eating, from phagein, “to eat”).

[Bill Carman]

SOMNORIFIC
[adjective]
inducing sleep; drowsiness; soporific.
Etymology: from Latin somnus (sleep, drowsiness) + the suffix -fic (a combining form meaning “making,” “producing,” “causing,” appearing in adjectives borrowed from Latin), blend of somnific and soporific.
[Audrey Benjaminsen - Sleeping Beauty]

SOMNORIFIC

[adjective]

inducing sleep; drowsiness; soporific.

Etymology: from Latin somnus (sleep, drowsiness) + the suffix -fic (a combining form meaning “making,” “producing,” “causing,” appearing in adjectives borrowed from Latin), blend of somnific and soporific.

[Audrey Benjaminsen - Sleeping Beauty]

Reading is that fruitful miracle of a communication in the midst of solitude.
Marcel Proust
ORNITHOMANCY
[noun]
divination from the flight and/or cries of birds.
Etymology: from Greek ornis, ornith- (bird) + manteia (prophecy).
[Angela Rizza]

ORNITHOMANCY

[noun]

divination from the flight and/or cries of birds.

Etymology: from Greek ornis, ornith- (bird) + manteia (prophecy).

[Angela Rizza]

SCHEDEL
[noun]
1. a skull.
2. a death’s head; a human skull, as symbol of death. 
Etymology: Dutch, from Middle Dutch schedele, from Old Dutch skēthila, *skeithila, “part, crown, crest, summit”, from Proto-Germanic *skaidilō, “part in the hair, top, crown, crest, summit”, from Proto-Indo-European *skÁit-, “to cut, part, separate”. Cognate with German Scheitel, “part, crest, apex”.
[Sierk van Meeuwen]

SCHEDEL

[noun]

1. a skull.

2. a death’s head; a human skull, as symbol of death. 

Etymology: Dutch, from Middle Dutch schedele, from Old Dutch skēthila, *skeithila, “part, crown, crest, summit”, from Proto-Germanic *skaidilō, “part in the hair, top, crown, crest, summit”, from Proto-Indo-European *skÁit-, “to cut, part, separate”. Cognate with German Scheitel, “part, crest, apex”.

[Sierk van Meeuwen]

CHIMAERA [aka CHIMERA]
[noun]
1. Classical Myth & Legend: a) a fire-breathing she-monster in Greek mythology having a lion’s head, a goat’s body, and a serpent’s tail, b) an imaginary monster compounded of incongruous parts.
2. an illusion or fabrication of the mind; especially an unrealisable dream.
3. Genetics: an individual, organ, or part consisting of tissues of diverse genetic constitution.
Etymology: from Latin chimaera, from Greek khimaira, “she-goat”, from khimaros, “he-goat”.
[Elisabetta Trevisan - Chimera, the Sound of Thunder]

CHIMAERA [aka CHIMERA]

[noun]

1. Classical Myth & Legend: a) a fire-breathing she-monster in Greek mythology having a lion’s head, a goat’s body, and a serpent’s tail, b) an imaginary monster compounded of incongruous parts.

2. an illusion or fabrication of the mind; especially an unrealisable dream.

3. Genetics: an individual, organ, or part consisting of tissues of diverse genetic constitution.

Etymology: from Latin chimaera, from Greek khimaira, “she-goat”, from khimaros, “he-goat”.

[Elisabetta Trevisan - Chimera, the Sound of Thunder]