A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
SHUMPGULLION
[noun]
a glutton; one who over-indulges in and over-consumes food, drink, or intoxicants to the point of waste.
Etymology: early 18th century (originally Scots) - of unknown origin.
[Lee Price]

SHUMPGULLION

[noun]

a glutton; one who over-indulges in and over-consumes food, drink, or intoxicants to the point of waste.

Etymology: early 18th century (originally Scots) - of unknown origin.

[Lee Price]

MORIENT
[adjective]
dying; at death’s door, at the last gasp, at the point of death, etc.
Etymology: ultimately from Latin mors, mort-, “death”.
[Martin Wittfooth]

MORIENT

[adjective]

dying; at death’s door, at the last gasp, at the point of death, etc.

Etymology: ultimately from Latin mors, mort-, “death”.

[Martin Wittfooth]

CHUÀNGZÀO LÌ
[noun]
Chinese: 创造力 - creativity; the ability to transcend traditional ideas, rules, patterns, relationships, or the like, and to create meaningful new ideas, forms, methods, interpretations, etc.; originality, progressiveness, or imagination.
Etymology: 创, chuàng (creativity; originality; to begin; to found) + 造, zào (to make; to build) + 力, lì (imaginative power; force; strength; endurance; affinity).
[Niken Anindita - Island]

CHUÀNGZÀO LÌ

[noun]

Chinese: 创造力 - creativity; the ability to transcend traditional ideas, rules, patterns, relationships, or the like, and to create meaningful new ideas, forms, methods, interpretations, etc.; originality, progressiveness, or imagination.

Etymology: 创, chuàng (creativity; originality; to begin; to found) + 造, zào (to make; to build) + 力, (imaginative power; force; strength; endurance; affinity).

[Niken Anindita - Island]

PREPOLLENCE
[noun]
the quality or state of being prepollent; superiority of power; predominance; prevalence.
Etymology: from Latin praepollens, past participle of praepollere, “to surpass in power”.
[Jean-Léon Gérôme - Caesar & Cleopatra]
[Disclaimer: attn history nerds, please note the sarcasm]

PREPOLLENCE

[noun]

the quality or state of being prepollent; superiority of power; predominance; prevalence.

Etymology: from Latin praepollens, past participle of praepollere, “to surpass in power”.

[Jean-Léon Gérôme - Caesar & Cleopatra]

[Disclaimer: attn history nerds, please note the sarcasm]

DOUR
[adjective]
1. sullen; gloomy.
2. severe; stern.
3. Scot: (of land) barren; rocky, infertile, or otherwise difficult or impossible to cultivate.
Etymology: Middle English < Latin dūrus.
[Audrey Benjaminsen - Mr. Poe]

DOUR

[adjective]

1. sullen; gloomy.

2. severe; stern.

3. Scot: (of land) barren; rocky, infertile, or otherwise difficult or impossible to cultivate.

Etymology: Middle English < Latin dūrus.

[Audrey Benjaminsen - Mr. Poe]

FLORESCENCE
[noun]
the act, state, or period of flowering; bloom.
Etymology: from Latin flōrēsc(ēns), present participle of flōrēscere, “to begin blooming, inchoative”, derivative of flōrēre, “to bloom”, derivative of flōs, “flower”.
[Peter Mohrbacher - Flower]

FLORESCENCE

[noun]

the act, state, or period of flowering; bloom.

Etymology: from Latin flōrēsc(ēns), present participle of flōrēscere, “to begin blooming, inchoative”, derivative of flōrēre, “to bloom”, derivative of flōs, “flower”.

[Peter Mohrbacher - Flower]

RECUMBENTIBUS

[noun]
a knockout punch, either verbal or physical; a knockdown blow.

Etymology: derived from Latin recumbēns, “reclining, falling down”.
[raultrevino]

RECUMBENTIBUS

[noun]

a knockout punch, either verbal or physical; a knockdown blow.

Etymology: derived from Latin recumbēns, “reclining, falling down”.

[raultrevino]

CENACLE
[noun]
1. a group of people, such as a discussion group or literary clique.
2. a dining room, especially on the upper floor.
3. the room in which the Last Supper was held.
Etymology: from Old French, from Late Latin cēnāculum, from cēna, “supper”.
[Vladimir Kush]

CENACLE

[noun]

1. a group of people, such as a discussion group or literary clique.

2. a dining room, especially on the upper floor.

3. the room in which the Last Supper was held.

Etymology: from Old French, from Late Latin cēnāculum, from cēna, “supper”.

[Vladimir Kush]

BELLICOSE
[adjective]
inclined or eager to fight; aggressively hostile; belligerent; pugnacious.
Etymology: late Middle English &lt; Latin bellicōsus, equivalent tobellic(us), &#8221;pertaining to war&#8221;.
[Tony Sandoval - The Polish Mermaid]

BELLICOSE

[adjective]

inclined or eager to fight; aggressively hostile; belligerent; pugnacious.

Etymology: late Middle English < Latin bellicōsus, equivalent tobellic(us), ”pertaining to war”.

[Tony Sandoval - The Polish Mermaid]

OÍCHE
[noun]
night; the time of darkness between one day to the next.
Etymology: Irish, from Old Irish aidche.
[Kelly Louise Judd]

OÍCHE

[noun]

night; the time of darkness between one day to the next.

Etymology: Irish, from Old Irish aidche.

[Kelly Louise Judd]

SCRIVEN
[verb]
to put in writing.
Etymology: back formation of scrivener, “writer”, from Middle English scriveiner, alteration of scrivein, from Anglo-French escrivein, from Vulgar Latin *scriban-, scriba, alteration of Latin scriba, “scribe”.
[Sylar113]

SCRIVEN

[verb]

to put in writing.

Etymology: back formation of scrivener, “writer”, from Middle English scriveiner, alteration of scrivein, from Anglo-French escrivein, from Vulgar Latin *scriban-, scriba, alteration of Latin scriba, “scribe”.

[Sylar113]

MALEFICIATE
[verb]
1. placed under an evil spell; especially if made impotent by sorcery.
2. to bewitch; to enchant; to charm; to affect by witchcraft or magic; cast a spell over.
Etymology: from Mediaeval Latin maleficiatus, past participle of maleficiare, “to bewitch, injure”, from Latin maleficium, “evil spell”.
[Tom Bagshaw - Evil Intent]

MALEFICIATE

[verb]

1. placed under an evil spell; especially if made impotent by sorcery.

2. to bewitch; to enchant; to charm; to affect by witchcraft or magic; cast a spell over.

Etymology: from Mediaeval Latin maleficiatus, past participle of maleficiare, “to bewitch, injure”, from Latin maleficium, “evil spell”.

[Tom Bagshaw - Evil Intent]

RHOPOGRAPHY
[noun]
painting still life; the art of depicting predominantly inanimate objects; the depiction of trivial, everyday things.
Etymology: Greek rhopos, “trivial objects, small wares, trifles” + -graphy, suffix denoting “writing, field of study”.
[Liam Liberty]

RHOPOGRAPHY

[noun]

painting still life; the art of depicting predominantly inanimate objects; the depiction of trivial, everyday things.

Etymology: Greek rhopos, “trivial objects, small wares, trifles” + -graphy, suffix denoting “writing, field of study”.

[Liam Liberty]

ENSORCELL [aka ENSORCEL]
[verb]
to bewitch; to enchant.
Etymology: from Middle French ensorceler, “to bewitch”, dissimilated variant of ensorcerer.
[Edward Burne-Jones - The Beguiling of Merlin]

ENSORCELL [aka ENSORCEL]

[verb]

to bewitch; to enchant.

Etymology: from Middle French ensorceler, “to bewitch”, dissimilated variant of ensorcerer.

[Edward Burne-Jones - The Beguiling of Merlin]

GÙSHÌ
[noun]
故 事 - story; tale; a narrative, either true or fictitious, in prose or verse, designed to interest, amuse, or instruct the hearer or reader.
Etymology: Chinese.
[Ilovedoodle - The Ocean of Story]

GÙSHÌ

[noun]

故 事 - story; tale; a narrative, either true or fictitious, in prose or verse, designed to interest, amuse, or instruct the hearer or reader.

Etymology: Chinese.

[Ilovedoodle - The Ocean of Story]