A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
PRUDENTIA
[noun]
1. acquaintance, knowledge.
2. sagacity, prudence, discretion.
3. foresight.
Etymology: Latin prūdentia, from prūdēns, “wise, prudent”.
[Brothers Hildebrandt]

PRUDENTIA

[noun]

1. acquaintance, knowledge.

2. sagacity, prudence, discretion.

3. foresight.

Etymology: Latin prūdentia, from prūdēns, “wise, prudent”.

[Brothers Hildebrandt]

ALBESCENT
[adjective] 
pale in colour; shading into, growing, or becoming white.
Etymology: from Latin albēscere, “to grow white”, from albus, “white”.
[hoooook]

ALBESCENT

[adjective]

pale in colour; shading into, growing, or becoming white.

Etymology: from Latin albēscere, “to grow white”, from albus, “white”.

[hoooook]

ALGOR
[noun]
chill; coldness, especially a moderate but uncomfortably penetrating coldness; a sensation of cold, usually with shivering.
Etymology: Latin.
[Eric Fortune - In The Sea]

ALGOR

[noun]

chill; coldness, especially a moderate but uncomfortably penetrating coldness; a sensation of cold, usually with shivering.

Etymology: Latin.

[Eric Fortune - In The Sea]

NYMPHET

[noun]

1. a pubescent girl regarded as sexually desirable.

2. a young girl who is sexually precocious and desirable

3. a sexually attractive young woman.

Etymology: nymph, from Middle English nimphe < Latin nympha < Greek nýmphē, “bride, nymph” + -et, a noun suffix having a diminutive force.

[Josephine Kahng]

RUPTILE
[adjective]
easily breakable.
Etymology: from Latin ruptūra, equivalent to rupt(us), past participle of rumpere, “to break” + -ile, a suffix of adjectives expressing capability, susceptibility, liability, aptitude, etc., from Latin -ilis.
[Beatriz Martin Vidal - Fragile]

RUPTILE

[adjective]

easily breakable.

Etymology: from Latin ruptūra, equivalent to rupt(us), past participle of rumpere, “to break” + -ile, a suffix of adjectives expressing capability, susceptibility, liability, aptitude, etc., from Latin -ilis.

[Beatriz Martin Vidal - Fragile]

CALLISTEIA
[noun]
1. beauty prizes; awards given for beauty.
2. the study of beauty.
3. festival celebrating beauty.
Etymology: from Greek kalli-, “beautiful” + -eia, suffix for the forming of abstract nouns.
[Enrique Simonet - El Juicio de Paris (The Judgement of Paris)]

CALLISTEIA

[noun]

1. beauty prizes; awards given for beauty.

2. the study of beauty.

3. festival celebrating beauty.

Etymology: from Greek kalli-, “beautiful” + -eia, suffix for the forming of abstract nouns.

[Enrique Simonet - El Juicio de Paris (The Judgement of Paris)]

RÓZSA

[noun]

rose; any of numerous shrubs or vines of the genus Rosa, having prickly stems, pinnately compound leaves, and variously coloured, often fragrant flowers.

Etymology: Hungarian.

[Alexei Antonov]

SHUMPGULLION
[noun]
a glutton; one who over-indulges in and over-consumes food, drink, or intoxicants to the point of waste.
Etymology: early 18th century (originally Scots) - of unknown origin.
[Lee Price]

SHUMPGULLION

[noun]

a glutton; one who over-indulges in and over-consumes food, drink, or intoxicants to the point of waste.

Etymology: early 18th century (originally Scots) - of unknown origin.

[Lee Price]

MORIENT
[adjective]
dying; at death’s door, at the last gasp, at the point of death, etc.
Etymology: ultimately from Latin mors, mort-, &#8220;death&#8221;.
[Martin Wittfooth]

MORIENT

[adjective]

dying; at death’s door, at the last gasp, at the point of death, etc.

Etymology: ultimately from Latin mors, mort-, “death”.

[Martin Wittfooth]

CHUÀNGZÀO LÌ
[noun]
Chinese: 创造力 - creativity; the ability to transcend traditional ideas, rules, patterns, relationships, or the like, and to create meaningful new ideas, forms, methods, interpretations, etc.; originality, progressiveness, or imagination.
Etymology: 创, chuàng (creativity; originality; to begin; to found) + 造, zào (to make; to build) + 力, lì (imaginative power; force; strength; endurance; affinity).
[Niken Anindita - Island]

CHUÀNGZÀO LÌ

[noun]

Chinese: 创造力 - creativity; the ability to transcend traditional ideas, rules, patterns, relationships, or the like, and to create meaningful new ideas, forms, methods, interpretations, etc.; originality, progressiveness, or imagination.

Etymology: 创, chuàng (creativity; originality; to begin; to found) + 造, zào (to make; to build) + 力, (imaginative power; force; strength; endurance; affinity).

[Niken Anindita - Island]

PREPOLLENCE
[noun]
the quality or state of being prepollent; superiority of power; predominance; prevalence.
Etymology: from Latin praepollens, past participle of praepollere, “to surpass in power”.
[Jean-Léon Gérôme - Caesar &amp; Cleopatra]
[Disclaimer: attn history nerds, please note the sarcasm]

PREPOLLENCE

[noun]

the quality or state of being prepollent; superiority of power; predominance; prevalence.

Etymology: from Latin praepollens, past participle of praepollere, “to surpass in power”.

[Jean-Léon Gérôme - Caesar & Cleopatra]

[Disclaimer: attn history nerds, please note the sarcasm]

DOUR
[adjective]
1. sullen; gloomy.
2. severe; stern.
3. Scot: (of land) barren; rocky, infertile, or otherwise difficult or impossible to cultivate.
Etymology: Middle English &lt; Latin dūrus.
[Audrey Benjaminsen - Mr. Poe]

DOUR

[adjective]

1. sullen; gloomy.

2. severe; stern.

3. Scot: (of land) barren; rocky, infertile, or otherwise difficult or impossible to cultivate.

Etymology: Middle English < Latin dūrus.

[Audrey Benjaminsen - Mr. Poe]

FLORESCENCE
[noun]
the act, state, or period of flowering; bloom.
Etymology: from Latin flōrēsc(ēns), present participle of flōrēscere, “to begin blooming, inchoative”, derivative of flōrēre, “to bloom”, derivative of flōs, “flower”.
[Peter Mohrbacher - Flower]

FLORESCENCE

[noun]

the act, state, or period of flowering; bloom.

Etymology: from Latin flōrēsc(ēns), present participle of flōrēscere, “to begin blooming, inchoative”, derivative of flōrēre, “to bloom”, derivative of flōs, “flower”.

[Peter Mohrbacher - Flower]

RECUMBENTIBUS

[noun]
a knockout punch, either verbal or physical; a knockdown blow.

Etymology: derived from Latin recumbēns, “reclining, falling down”.
[raultrevino]

RECUMBENTIBUS

[noun]

a knockout punch, either verbal or physical; a knockdown blow.

Etymology: derived from Latin recumbēns, “reclining, falling down”.

[raultrevino]

CENACLE
[noun]
1. a group of people, such as a discussion group or literary clique.
2. a dining room, especially on the upper floor.
3. the room in which the Last Supper was held.
Etymology: from Old French, from Late Latin cēnāculum, from cēna, “supper”.
[Vladimir Kush]

CENACLE

[noun]

1. a group of people, such as a discussion group or literary clique.

2. a dining room, especially on the upper floor.

3. the room in which the Last Supper was held.

Etymology: from Old French, from Late Latin cēnāculum, from cēna, “supper”.

[Vladimir Kush]