A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
TREPIDATION
[noun]
1. a state of alarm or dread; apprehension; tremulous fear; agitation.
2. an involuntary trembling or quivering; tremor.
Etymology: from Latin trepidātiō, derivative of trepidā(re), “to be apprehensive, panic”.
[Adrian Borda - I’m Just A Puppet Of My Fears]

TREPIDATION

[noun]

1. a state of alarm or dread; apprehension; tremulous fear; agitation.

2. an involuntary trembling or quivering; tremor.

Etymology: from Latin trepidātiō, derivative of trepidā(re), “to be apprehensive, panic”.

[Adrian Borda - I’m Just A Puppet Of My Fears]

SELENOCENTRIC
[adjective]
1. having the moon as its centre.
2. of or pertaining to the centre of the moon.
3. believing the moon is of the utmost importance; from the point of the moon.
Etymology: seleno- (Greek selḗnē) + -centric (Greek kentron), modelled on geocentric.
[Hana Jang - Eyebrow Moon]

SELENOCENTRIC

[adjective]

1. having the moon as its centre.

2. of or pertaining to the centre of the moon.

3. believing the moon is of the utmost importance; from the point of the moon.

Etymologyseleno- (Greek selḗnē) + -centric (Greek kentron), modelled on geocentric.

[Hana Jang - Eyebrow Moon]

FOLDEROL [aka FALDERAL]
[noun]
1. foolishness; nonsense.
2. a trifle; a gewgaw; gimcrack.
3. a nonsensical refrain in old songs.
Etymology: originally as a nonsense refrain in songs; of obscure origin.
[Chris Buzelli]

FOLDEROL [aka FALDERAL]

[noun]

1. foolishness; nonsense.

2. a trifle; a gewgaw; gimcrack.

3. a nonsensical refrain in old songs.

Etymology: originally as a nonsense refrain in songs; of obscure origin.

[Chris Buzelli]

NEBULA
[noun]
1. Astronomy: a) also called diffuse nebula: a cloud of interstellar gas and dust. b) (formerly) any celestial object that appears nebulous, hazy, or fuzzy, and extended in a telescope view.
2. Pathology: a) a faint opacity in the cornea. b) cloudiness in the urine.
3. any liquid medication prepared for use as a spray.
Etymology: from Latin, “a mist, vapour, cloud”; akin to Greek nephélē, “cloud”, German Nebel, “fog, haze”.
[Sara K. Diesel - Andromeda]

NEBULA

[noun]

1. Astronomy: a) also called diffuse nebula: a cloud of interstellar gas and dust. b) (formerly) any celestial object that appears nebulous, hazy, or fuzzy, and extended in a telescope view.

2. Pathology: a) a faint opacity in the cornea. b) cloudiness in the urine.

3. any liquid medication prepared for use as a spray.

Etymology: from Latin, “a mist, vapour, cloud”; akin to Greek nephélē, “cloud”, German Nebel, “fog, haze”.

[Sara K. Diesel - Andromeda]

SQUELETTIQUE
[adjective]
skeletal; of, relating to, or functioning as a skeleton.
Etymology: French, from squelette, borrowed from Latin sceletus, from Ancient Greek σκελετός, skeletos, “dried up, withered, dried body, parched, mummy”.
[Haruko Maeda]

SQUELETTIQUE

[adjective]

skeletal; of, relating to, or functioning as a skeleton.

Etymology: French, from squelette, borrowed from Latin sceletus, from Ancient Greek σκελετός, skeletos, “dried up, withered, dried body, parched, mummy”.

[Haruko Maeda]

PERTURB
[verb]
1. to disturb or disquiet greatly in mind; agitate; unsettle.
2. to throw into great disorder; derange.
3. Astronomy: to cause perturbation in the orbit of (a celestial body).
Etymology: from Middle English perturben < Old French perturber < Latin perturbāre, “to throw into confusion”, equivalent to per-, prefix for “thoroughly; utterly” + turbāre, “to disturb”.
[Huebucket]

PERTURB

[verb]

1. to disturb or disquiet greatly in mind; agitate; unsettle.

2. to throw into great disorder; derange.

3. Astronomy: to cause perturbation in the orbit of (a celestial body).

Etymology: from Middle English perturben < Old French perturber < Latin perturbāre, “to throw into confusion”, equivalent to per-, prefix for “thoroughly; utterly” + turbāre, “to disturb”.

[Huebucket]

ERYTHROCOMOUS
[adjective]
Informal: to possess red hair.
Etymology: from Greek eruthros, “red” + -comous, derived from kómē, “hair”.
[Jasmine Becket-Griffith - Ariel: Part of Your World]

ERYTHROCOMOUS

[adjective]

Informal: to possess red hair.

Etymology: from Greek eruthros, “red” + -comous, derived from kómē, “hair”.

[Jasmine Becket-Griffith - Ariel: Part of Your World]

VESTIARY

[noun]

1. a room for storing clothes or dressing in, such as a vestry.

[adjective]

2. Clothing & Fashion: of or relating to clothes.

Etymology: from Late Latin vestiārius, from vestis, “clothing”.

[Paul Romano - Winter Carapace]

IRIS
[noun]
1. Greek mythology: the personification of the rainbow and messenger of the gods. She is also known as one of the goddesses of the sea and the sky. Iris links the gods to humanity. She travels with the speed of wind from one end of the world to the other, and into the depths of the sea and the underworld.
2. a rainbow.
3. Anatomy: the contractile, circular diaphragm forming the coloured portion of the eye and containing a circular opening, the pupil, in its centre.
4. Botany: any plant of the genus Iris, having showy flowers and sword-shaped leaves. Compare iris family.
Etymology: from Ancient Greek Ἶρις iris, &#8220;rainbow&#8221;.
[Shannon Bonatakis]

IRIS

[noun]

1. Greek mythology: the personification of the rainbow and messenger of the gods. She is also known as one of the goddesses of the sea and the sky. Iris links the gods to humanity. She travels with the speed of wind from one end of the world to the other, and into the depths of the sea and the underworld.

2. a rainbow.

3. Anatomy: the contractile, circular diaphragm forming the coloured portion of the eye and containing a circular opening, the pupil, in its centre.

4. Botany: any plant of the genus Iris, having showy flowers and sword-shaped leaves. Compare iris family.

Etymology: from Ancient Greek Ἶρις iris, “rainbow”.

[Shannon Bonatakis]

CHARY
[adjective]
1. cautious or careful; wary.
2. shy; timid.
3. fastidious; choosy; finicky.
4. sparing (often followed by of).
Etymology: from Old English cearig; related to caru, “care”, Old High German charag, “sorrowful”.
[Tom Bagshaw - Prophecy]

CHARY

[adjective]

1. cautious or careful; wary.

2. shy; timid.

3. fastidious; choosy; finicky.

4. sparing (often followed by of).

Etymology: from Old English cearig; related to caru, “care”, Old High German charag, “sorrowful”.

[Tom Bagshaw - Prophecy]

HALITUS
[noun]
exhaled breath.
Etymology: Latin, related to halare &#8220;to breathe&#8221;.
[Martin Wittfooth]

HALITUS

[noun]

exhaled breath.

Etymology: Latin, related to halare “to breathe”.

[Martin Wittfooth]

GUNSLINGER
[noun]
1. a person noted for speed and skill in handling and shooting a gun especially in the American West.
2. gun fighter.
3. a person who acts in an aggressive and decisive manner, especially in business or politics, as an investor who takes large risks in seeking large, quick gains.
Etymology: gun (from Middle English gunne, gonne, apparently short for Anglo-Latin Gunilda, gonnyld, name for engine of war; compare Old Norse Gunna, short for Gunnhildr,woman&#8217;s name) + sling (from Middle English slyngen &lt; Old Norse slyngva, “to sling, fling”, cognate with Old English slingan, “to wind, twist”) + -er (a suffix used in forming nouns designating persons from the object of their occupation or labour, or from their place of origin or abode).
[Chris Rahn]

GUNSLINGER

[noun]

1. a person noted for speed and skill in handling and shooting a gun especially in the American West.

2. gun fighter.

3. a person who acts in an aggressive and decisive manner, especially in business or politics, as an investor who takes large risks in seeking large, quick gains.

Etymology: gun (from Middle English gunne, gonne, apparently short for Anglo-Latin Gunilda, gonnyld, name for engine of war; compare Old Norse Gunna, short for Gunnhildr,woman’s name) + sling (from Middle English slyngen < Old Norse slyngva, “to sling, fling”, cognate with Old English slingan, “to wind, twist”) + -er (a suffix used in forming nouns designating persons from the object of their occupation or labour, or from their place of origin or abode).

[Chris Rahn]

COSMOPOIETIC
[adjective]
cosmos-producing; world-creating.
Etymology: from Greek kosmopoiētikos, from kosm- cosm-,  world, universe, order” + poiētikos, “capable of making, creative, poetical”.
 [Freydoon Rassouli - Cosmic Attraction]

COSMOPOIETIC

[adjective]

cosmos-producing; world-creating.

Etymology: from Greek kosmopoiētikos, from kosm- cosm-,
world, universe, order” + poiētikos, “capable of making, creative, poetical”.

 [Freydoon Rassouli - Cosmic Attraction]

MINATORY
[adjective]
of a menacing or threatening nature; minacious.
Etymology: from Late Latin minātōrius, from Latin minārī - to threaten.
[Tomasz Alen Kopera]

MINATORY

[adjective]

of a menacing or threatening nature; minacious.

Etymology: from Late Latin minātōrius, from Latin minārī - to threaten.

[Tomasz Alen Kopera]

When I have a little money, I buy books; and if I have any left, I buy food and clothes.
Desiderius Erasmus (via observando)