A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
ANTIQUATE
[verb]
1. to make obsolete or old-fashioned.
2. to give an old or antique appearance to.
Etymology: from Mediaeval Latin antīquātus, “old, ancient”, past participle of antiquāre, “to make old”.
[Peter Diamond - Peace Bites the Dust]

ANTIQUATE

[verb]

1. to make obsolete or old-fashioned.

2. to give an old or antique appearance to.

Etymology: from Mediaeval Latin antīquātus, “old, ancient”, past participle of antiquāre, “to make old”.

[Peter Diamond - Peace Bites the Dust]

Re: “can you please include pronunciation?”

Please find my previous answer here.

Also can I just say something to the eejits who tend to react with a condescending “har har har that person mispronounced Word X, what a dumb shit” attitude towards mispronunciations…can you just shut the fuck up for a moment and think about why that person didn’t pronounce it correctly? Here are some plausible reasons:

1) they have a different accent (!!)

2) they didn’t have a teacher patient enough to “show them the way” thus made the effort to teach themselves and brave the attempt – this is something you should commend them on, not shame them for.

3) their lexicon, i.e. body of information is different to yours….no individual holds the key to all doors of perception and knowledge.

SCHMALTZ 
[noun] 
1. Informal: exaggerated sentimentalism, as in music or soap operas. 
2. fat or grease, especially of a chicken; lard. 
Etymology: from German Schmalz and Yiddish, “melted fat”, from Old High German smalz.
[Sir Frank Dicksee - Romeo & Juliet]

SCHMALTZ 

[noun] 

1. Informal: exaggerated sentimentalism, as in music or soap operas. 

2. fat or grease, especially of a chicken; lard. 

Etymology: from German Schmalz and Yiddish, “melted fat”, from Old High German smalz.

[Sir Frank Dicksee - Romeo & Juliet]

perfect name for alcohol…
(not my photo)

perfect name for alcohol…

(not my photo)

HOROMETRY
[noun]
the art, practice, or method of measuring time by hours and subordinate divisions; the art or science of measuring time.
Etymology: ultimately from Ancient Greek hṓra, “time, season, year” + métron, “measure”.
[Vladimir Kush]

HOROMETRY

[noun]

the art, practice, or method of measuring time by hours and subordinate divisions; the art or science of measuring time.

Etymologyultimately from Ancient Greek hṓra, “time, season, year” + métron, “measure”.

[Vladimir Kush]

SPECULAR
[adjective]
1. of, relating to, or having the properties of a mirror or speculum.
2. reflective.
Etymology: from Latin speculāris, from speculum, “a mirror”, from specere, “to look at”.
[25kartinok]

SPECULAR

[adjective]

1. of, relating to, or having the properties of a mirror or speculum.

2. reflective.

Etymology: from Latin speculāris, from speculum, “a mirror”, from specere, “to look at”.

[25kartinok]

FLORICIDE
[noun]
the killing of flowers.
Etymology: ultimately from Latin flōs, “flower” + caedō, “cut, kill”.
[Alexei Antonov - Rose Assassin]

FLORICIDE

[noun]

the killing of flowers.

Etymology: ultimately from Latin flōs, “flower” + caedō, “cut, kill”.

[Alexei Antonov - Rose Assassin]

HYDRATION
[noun]
the act of supplying water to (a person or plant, for example) in order to restore or maintain fluid balance.
Etymology: ultimately derived from hydro-, from Ancient Greek ὑδρο- (hudro-), from ὕδωρ (húdōr, “water”).
[Kelly Louise Judd]

HYDRATION

[noun]

the act of supplying water to (a person or plant, for example) in order to restore or maintain fluid balance.

Etymology: ultimately derived from hydro-, from Ancient Greek ὑδρο- (hudro-), from ὕδωρ (húdōr, “water”).

[Kelly Louise Judd]

I had always imagined Paradise as a kind of library.
Jorge Luis Borges
FOSSICK
[verb]
1. to rummage or search around, especially for a possible profit.
2. to search for gold, especially by reworking washings or waste piles.
3. to search for by or as if by rummaging.
4. to ferret out.
Etymology: origin not certain, considered to be Australian, probably from English dialect fussock, “to bustle about”, from fuss, “an excessive display of anxious attention or activity; needless or useless bustle”.
[Chris Buzelli]

FOSSICK

[verb]

1. to rummage or search around, especially for a possible profit.

2. to search for gold, especially by reworking washings or waste piles.

3. to search for by or as if by rummaging.

4. to ferret out.

Etymology: origin not certain, considered to be Australian, probably from English dialect fussock, “to bustle about”, from fuss, “an excessive display of anxious attention or activity; needless or useless bustle”.

[Chris Buzelli]

CITRIC

[adjective]

of or derived from citrus fruits or citric acid; sour or acidic.

Etymology: from Latin citrus, “citron tree, thuja”, related to Greek kedros, “cedar”.

[Lee Price]

LESEN
[verb]
1. to read.
2. to gather up.
Etymology: German, from Middle High German lesen, from Old High German lesan, from Proto-Germanic Proto-Germanic *lesaną, “to gather”, from Proto-Indo-European *les-, *leg-, “to gather”.
[Anna-Maria Jung - Silence in the Library]

LESEN

[verb]

1. to read.

2. to gather up.

Etymology: German, from Middle High German lesen, from Old High German lesan, from Proto-Germanic Proto-Germanic *lesaną, “to gather”, from Proto-Indo-European *les-, *leg-, “to gather”.

[Anna-Maria Jung - Silence in the Library]

OPHIOCOMOUS
[adjective]
snake-like hair.
Etymology: from Ancient Greek óphis, “snake” + kome, “head of hair”.
[Jérémie Fleury - Medusela]

OPHIOCOMOUS

[adjective]

snake-like hair.

Etymology: from Ancient Greek óphis, “snake” + kome, “head of hair”.

[Jérémie Fleury - Medusela]

PERDIDO
[adjective]
1. lost.
2. hopeless.
3. helpless.
4. missing.
Etymology: Spanish, Galician, from Latin perditus.
[Victor Calahan - Lost in Space]

PERDIDO

[adjective]

1. lost.

2. hopeless.

3. helpless.

4. missing.

Etymology: Spanish, Galician, from Latin perditus.

[Victor Calahan - Lost in Space]