A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
DECOLLATION
[noun]
the act of decapitation; beheading or being beheaded.
Etymology: from the Latin decollatus, from de, “to depart, withdraw from”+ collum, “a neck or cervix”.
[Abigail Larson - The Headless Horseman]

DECOLLATION

[noun]

the act of decapitation; beheading or being beheaded.

Etymology: from the Latin decollatus, from de, “to depart, withdraw from”+ collum, “a neck or cervix”.

[Abigail Larson - The Headless Horseman]

MADEFY

[verb]

to make wet or moist.

Etymology: Latin madefacere, "to make wet"; madere, ”to be wet”.

[Lee Price]

DELETERIOUS
[adjective]
1. harmful to the body or mind; injurious.
2. harmful often in a subtle or unexpected way.
Etymology: from Ancient Greek δηλητήριος (dēlētḗrios, “noxious, deleterious”), from δηλητήρ (dēlētḗr, “a destroyer”), from δηλέομαι (dēléomai, “I hurt, damage, spoil, waste”).
[Budi Satria Kwan - Lethal Love]

DELETERIOUS

[adjective]

1. harmful to the body or mind; injurious.

2. harmful often in a subtle or unexpected way.

Etymology: from Ancient Greek δηλητήριος (dēlētḗrios, “noxious, deleterious”), from δηλητήρ (dēlētḗr, “a destroyer”), from δηλέομαι (dēléomai, “I hurt, damage, spoil, waste”).

[Budi Satria Kwan - Lethal Love]

PLANGENCY
[noun]
1. the condition or quality of producing a deep or loud sound.
2. expression of mourning; demonstration of sadness, plaintiveness, sorrow; a lamentation.
Etymology: from Latin plangens, present participle of plango, “to beat (especially the breast, in grief)”.
[Evelyn De Morgan - The Mourners]

PLANGENCY

[noun]

1. the condition or quality of producing a deep or loud sound.

2. expression of mourning; demonstration of sadness, plaintiveness, sorrow; a lamentation.

Etymology: from Latin plangens, present participle of plango, “to beat (especially the breast, in grief)”.

[Evelyn De Morgan - The Mourners]

CRUCIBLE
[noun] 
1. a container of metal or refractory material employed for heating substances to high temperatures.
2. Metallurgy: a hollow area at the bottom of a furnace in which the metal collects.
3. a severe, searching test or trial.
Etymology: from late Middle English crusible, corusible < Mediaeval Latin crūcibulum, “night lamp”.
[J. Slattum - Crucible]

CRUCIBLE

[noun]

1. a container of metal or refractory material employed for heating substances to high temperatures.

2. Metallurgy: a hollow area at the bottom of a furnace in which the metal collects.

3. a severe, searching test or trial.

Etymology: from late Middle English crusible, corusible < Mediaeval Latin crūcibulum, “night lamp”.

[J. Slattum - Crucible]

LACHRYMIFORM

[adjective]

having the form of a tear; tear-shaped.

Etymology: from Latin lacrima, “tear” + -fōrma, “form, figure, model, mold, sort”.

[Greg Barrett]

[primary source &amp; secondary source]
GAIETY
[noun]
1. the state of being gay or cheerful; gay spirits.
2. often, gaieties - merrymaking or festivity.
3. showiness; finery.
Etymology: from French gaieté, from gai, &#8220;gay&#8221;.
[Herbert James Draper - Vintage Morn]

GAIETY

[noun]

1. the state of being gay or cheerful; gay spirits.

2. often, gaieties - merrymaking or festivity.

3. showiness; finery.

Etymology: from French gaieté, from gai, “gay”.

[Herbert James Draper - Vintage Morn]

MULTIVERSE
[noun]
the hypothetical set of multiple possible universes (including the historical universe we consistently experience) that together comprise everything that exists and can exist: the entirety of space, time, matter and energy as well as the physical laws and constants that describe them. An infinite realm of being or potential being of which the universe is regarded as a part or instance.
Etymology: based on universe, from Latin multi, combining form of multus, &#8221;much, many&#8221; + verse, from versus, "turned".
[fyyff]

MULTIVERSE

[noun]

the hypothetical set of multiple possible universes (including the historical universe we consistently experience) that together comprise everything that exists and can exist: the entirety of space, time, matter and energy as well as the physical laws and constants that describe them. An infinite realm of being or potential being of which the universe is regarded as a part or instance.

Etymology: based on universe, from Latin multi, combining form of multus, ”much, many” + verse, from versus, "turned".

[fyyff]

FRANION
[noun]
1. a cheerful, frivolous person, a silly man; a gay, idle fellow.
2. a loose woman.
3. a paramour.
Etymology: origin uncertain, potentially from French fainéant, “an idler”.
[Leopold Schmutzler]

FRANION

[noun]

1. a cheerful, frivolous person, a silly man; a gay, idle fellow.

2. a loose woman.

3. a paramour.

Etymology: origin uncertain, potentially from French fainéant, “an idler”.

[Leopold Schmutzler]

HYETAL

[adjective]

of or pertaining to rain or rainfall.

Etymology: from Greek huetos, “rain”.

[Gregory Thielker]

PEONY
[noun]
any of various plants or shrubs of the genus Paeonia, having large, showy flowers, as the widely cultivated species P. lactiflora: the state flower of Indiana; a girl’s name after the flower Peony.
Etymology: from Old English peonie, from Latin paeōnia, from Greek paiōnia; related to paiōnios, “healing”, from paiōn, “physician”.
[Josephine Kahng]

PEONY

[noun]

any of various plants or shrubs of the genus Paeonia, having large, showy flowers, as the widely cultivated species P. lactiflora: the state flower of Indiana; a girl’s name after the flower Peony.

Etymology: from Old English peonie, from Latin paeōnia, from Greek paiōnia; related to paiōnios, “healing”, from paiōn, “physician”.

[Josephine Kahng]

AVIS
[noun] 
1. a bird.
2. an omen, portent.
Etymology: Latin from Proto-Italic *awis, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éwis. Cognates include Ancient Greek ἀετός (aetós) and Sanskrit वि (ví).
[April Schumacher]

AVIS

[noun]

1. a bird.

2. an omen, portent.

Etymology: Latin from Proto-Italic *awis, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éwis. Cognates include Ancient Greek ἀετός (aetós) and Sanskrit वि ().

[April Schumacher]

EMBRUE [aka IMBRUE]

[verb]

1. to stain, as with blood; bloodstains.

2. to impregnate or imbue.

Etymology: late Middle English enbrewen < Middle French embreuver- “to cause to drink in, soak, drench” < Vulgar Latin *imbiberāre, derivative of Latin imbibere, ”to imbibe.”

[Gottfried Helnwein]