A Lackadaisical Lexicon for Laggard Logophiles
RESPONSES TO SNEEZING:
In non-English-speaking cultures, words referencing good health or a long life are often used instead of “bless you”, though some also use references to God.
In Albanian, one says Shëndet (shuhn-det), to which typical responses are Faleminderit, meaning “Thank you”, or Shëndet paç, meaning literally “May you have health”.
In American Sign Language, native Deaf users typically do not respond to sneezes, but a hearing user may use the ASL words for “BLESS YOU”.
In Amharic, ይማርሽ (yimarish) for female or ይማርህ (yimarih) for male is said, meaning “may God forgive you”. The person who sneezed then responds by saying ያኑሪሽ (yanurish) for female or ያኑርህ (yanurih) for male, meaning “may you live for long”.
In Afrikaans, “Gesondheid” ([to your] “Health”) is said after a sneeze.
In Arabic, a response is صحة (Sahha), meaning “health” The response is either thank you شكراً (Shukran) or تسلم (Tislam/Taslam) which means “may you be kept safe”. Another typical interaction (from Islam’s teachings) is for the sneezer to say Alhamdo lel lah/Alhamdulillah i.e. “All praise is for Allah (God)”, after which a responder would say, يرحمكم الله (yarhamkom Allah) (God have mercy on you) and the answer is يهديكم الله و يصلح بالكم (Yahdeekom Allah wa yousleh balakom) (God guide you and make you right).
In Armenian, one says առողջություն (aroghjootyoon), which means “health”.
In Assamese, when someone sneezes, a person says মঙ্গল হওক (môngôl hôwk) to him, which means “May good happen”.
In Azeri, sneezing is usually followed by the response Sağlam ol, which means “be healthy”. Sometimes, Afiat is used, similar to the Persian response.
In Belarusian the response is будзь здаровы / будзь здароў (Budz zdarovy / budz zdarou) directed to a male person and будзь здаровая (Budz zdarovaja) for a female. The answer is дзякуй (dziakuj, thank you)
In Bosnian, one says Nazdravlje, meaning “To your good health”. The person who sneezed usually responds with Hvala, meaning “Thank you”.
In Bulgarian, one says Наздраве (Nazdrave), which means “[to your] health” or “cheers”. The person who has sneezed can then say Благодаря (Blagodarya), which means “Thank you”.
In Catalan, one says Jesús or Salut. The person who has sneezed would then reply Gràcies for thank you.
In Cantonese, one says “大吉利事”, which literally means “a great fortunate occurrence”.
In Chechen, the response is Dukha vehil (to man) or Dukha yehil (to woman), which means “live for a long time”.
In Chinese, one may say 一百岁 (yì bǎi suì) (Mandarin) which means (may you) live a hundred years. You might also say 长命百岁 (chánɡ mìnɡ bǎi suì) (Mandarin) which may you live to 100 years. However others may frequently not comment on the sneeze; whereas the polite sneezer might want to follow up a sneeze with 不好意思 (bù hǎo yì si) (Mandarin) or 唔好意思 (Cantonese), meaning “excuse me” or “sorry”.
In Croatian, Na zdravlje (almost always pronounced nazdravlje) ([to your] “Health”) is said after a sneeze. For sneezer it is polite to reply Hvala meaning “thank you.”
In Czech, one says Pozdrav Pánbůh, meaning in colloquial Czech “Bless God” or “Greet God”, or Na zdraví, which means “To your health” and can be followed by the response Ať slouží (“May it last”). It is also less common to say Je to pravda (“It is true”).
In Danish, Prosit (“to [your] health”) is said after a sneeze. The polite response is “tak” (“thank you”).
In Dutch, one usually says gezondheid (literally translated as “health”), to which the person who sneezed will respond with dank u (wel) (thank you, formal) or dank je (wel) (thank you, informal). If the same person sneezes thrice, an informal comment would be (Drie keer) morgen mooi weer (which means “(Three times) the weather [will be] nice tomorrow”). This response can be made by both sneezer and non-sneezer.
In English, the usual response is (God) bless you or less commonly Gesundheit (from German, meaning good health).
In Esperanto, the usual response is Sanon (meaning “health”)
In Estonian, the usual response is Terviseks (meaning “For your health”)
In Finnish the usual response is Terveydeksi (meaning “For health”)
In French the usual response is à tes / vos souhaits which means “to your wishes”. If the same person sneezes again, one sometimes says à tes / vos amours, which means “to your loves.” If the same person sneezes a third time, then he/she responds to the original greeter saying et que les tiens / vôtres durent toujours, which means “and may yours last forever.” A more archaïc response would be Dieu te/vous bénisse (“God bless you”). Santé(meaning “health”) is a common response in some French-speaking countries, including Switzerland.
In Georgian, “ჯანმრთელობა” (“Health”) is said after a sneeze. Other responses include “Million dollars”, referencing the belief that one loses money while sneezing. Some sneezers respond with “Half!” (as in, a loss of only half a million dollars).
In German, Gesundheit (“health”) is said after a sneeze. The sneezer responds Danke (“thank you”). Sometimes other wishes are uttered at following sneezes, e.g. Zufriedenheit (“contentment”), Reichtum (“wealthiness”) or (humorously) Schönheit (“beauty”). The German word Gesundheit passed into local English usage in areas with substantial German-speaking populations. The expression is first widely attested in American English as of 1910, about the time when large numbers of Yiddish-speaking Ashkenazi Jews immigrated to the United States.
In Greek, στην υγεία σου (steen eyia sue) is said meaning “to your health” or γείτσες (“healths”).
In Hebrew, לבריאות (livri’oot or labri’oot, “to [your] health”) is said after a sneeze. The polite response is תודה (todah, “thank you”). (See entry under “Yiddish”, below, for other responses in Jewish culture/languages.)
In Hindi, there are multiple phrases, one says हरी ॐ, “’Hari Om’" (the shortest mantra referring to the universality of Om) or सत्यम, Satyam (sat’yam), meaning “truth” (also a shortened version of the mantra सत्यम शिवम् सुन्दरम, “Satyam Shivam Sundaram”, meaning “truth (is) God (is) beautiful”), or colloquially जीते रहो ”’Jite Raho’" (have a long life).
In Hungarian, one says Egészségedre!, which means “[to your] health”. The polite response is Köszönöm, meaning “Thank you”.
In Icelandic, one says Guð hjálpi þér! (“God help you!”). There is also an old custom to respond three times to three sneezes like so: Guð hjálpi þér (“God help you”), styrki þig (“strengthen you”), og styðji (“and support”). This can be shortened to Hjálpi þér (“Bless you / Help you”).
In Indonesia the sneezer will utter Alhamdulilah meaning God bless
In Irish, one says "Dia linn" or "Dia leat" (“God be with us”). Also “deiseal”, a deprecation meaning “may it go right”. The sneezer could say gabh mo leithscéal meaning “excuse me.”
In Italian, one says Salute! meaning “[to your] health”
In Japanese, generally, nothing is said. However, one who sneezes could say すみません (sumimasen, sorry) or 失礼しました (shitsurei shimashita, excuse me) following a sneeze. A Japanese superstition says that if one sneezes, they are being talked about by someone, somewhere (like the American warm ears superstition).
In Kazakh, one can say Сау Болыңыз (Saw Bolıñız) meaning “be healthy”.
In Khmer, one says Baoi.
In Kirundi, one says Kira, meaning “be healthy”, and the sneezer then says Twese, meaning “us all”
In Kurdish,the response is kher be inshalla, which means it will be a good thing God willing. Many times when one sneezes they say the thing they are about to do will not happen. So when the person sneezes they say kher bewhich means a good sign hopefully.
In Kyrgyz, one says Акчуч! [aqˈt͡ʃut͡ʃ] (which may be based on an onomatopœia of the sound of a sneeze, like English “atchoo” discussed above), to which one may respond Ракмат!, meaning “thank you”, if the person who said “акчуч” is liked.
In Ladino language, one says “Vivas,” which means “may you live.” After a second sneeze, one says “Crescas,” which means “may you grow.”
In Latgalian, one says Veseleibā, which means “to your health”. And the person who sneezes answers Paļdis, which translates as “Thank you”.
In Latvian, one says Uz veselību, which means “to your health”.
In Lithuanian, one says Į sveikatą, which means “to your health”. And the person who sneezes answers Ačiū, which translates as “Thank you”.
In Lojban, there is no set phrase. One of the more common ones are “kanro .a’o” (kanro aho) where “kanro” means “health” and “.a’o” is an attitudinal indicating it is said with hope. Another one is “.a’o do kanro” (aho do kanro), which means “[said with hope] Be healthy.”
In Luganda, one would say Bbuka,meaning “recover”.
In Macedonian, one says На здравје(na zdravje), meaning “[To Your] Health”. The person who sneezes usually says Здравје да имаш (zdravje da imash) which means “Have Health [yourself]”, or just saysБлагодарам(blagodaram) “Thank You” or Фала(fala) “Thanks”.
In Malayalam, there is no commonly or widely used phrase in response to a sneeze. However, references to God (such as ഹരി) or a variation of the term is used, especially when a child sneezes.
In Maltese, one says Evviva, which comes from the Italian “may he/she live” or “long live…”.
In Mongolian, one says Бурхан өршөө(Burkhan örshöö), which means “May god forgive you.”
In Persian, if the sneeze is especially dramatic, Afiat Bahsheh (عافیت باشه) is said, “[May] Cleanliness/Purity be bestowed [upon you]”.
In Nepali, one says ʼचिरन्जिभी (chiranjivī), meaning “may you live long.”
In Norwegian, Prosit (“to [your] health”) is said after a sneeze. The polite response is “takk” (“thank you”).
In Polish, Na zdrowie ([to your] “Health” – meaning “may you get healthier”).
In Portuguese one says Santinho (“Little Saint”), Saúde (“[To your] Health”), [que] Deus te salve (“[may] God save you”), Viva (the closest would be “long life [to you]”), or [que] Deus te abafe (may God put a cover/blanket over you).
In Brazilian Portuguese one says Saúde, which means “[To your] Health”.
In Punjabi one says ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂ (Waheguru), which means “Glorious Lord”.
In Romanian, one says Sănătate (“[To your] Health”) or Noroc (“[To your] Luck”).
In Russian the response is будь здоров (bood’ zdorov, be healthy) directed to a male person and будь здорова (bood’ zdorova) to a female. The answer is спасибо (spasibo, thank you)
In Scandinavia, i.e., Norway, Sweden and Denmark, one says Prosit, from the Latin meaning “to your benefit”. Originally used when toasting, today it is used only when someone sneezes.
In Serbian, Na zdravlje (almost always pronounced nazdravlje) ([to your] “Health”) is said after a sneeze. For the sneezer, it is polite to reply Hvala meaning “Thank you.” Less frequent, but also a common response is Istina, meaning “it is true”.
In Slovak, Na zdravie ([to your] “Health”) is said after a sneeze. For the sneezer, it is polite to reply Ďakujem meaning “Thank You.”
In Slovenian, Na zdravje (almost always pronounced nazdravje) ([to your] “Health”) is a response to someone’s sneeze. For the sneezer, it is polite to reply Hvala meaning “Thank You.” Nowadays old-fashioned response to a sneeze would be Bog pomagaj, meaning “God help [to you]”.
In Spanish, one says Salud, which means “[to your] health” and Jesús (in Spain) referring to Christ (similarly to God bless you in English). If a person sneezes more than once, after the first sneeze one still says Salud. After the second sneeze one may say Dinero (meaning “money”), and after the third sneeze one may say Amor (meaning “love”).
In Swedish the most common response to someone sneezing is prosit to which the sneezer responds tack (thank you).
In Tamil, most sneezes are greeted with ஆயுசு நூறு (aayusu nooru, [aːjʉsʉ nuːɾʉ]), meaning ” may you live for a hundred years”
In Telugu, the phrase is Chiranjeevi Bhava, which translates to “(May you be blessed with a) Life without death”. Another widely used response is దీర్ఘాయుష్మాన్ భవ, which translates to ‘May you live long’.
In Turkish, a sneezer is always told to Çok Yaşa, i.e. “Live Long”, which in turn receives a response of either Sen De Gör (“[and I hope that] you see it”) or Hep Beraber (“all together”). This is to indicate the sneezer’s wish that the person wishing them a long life also has a long life so they can “live long” “all together”. In more polite circles, one might say Güzel Yaşayın, i.e. “[May You] Live Beautifully”, which may be countered with a Siz de Görün (“[And may You] witness it”).
In Ukrainian, the appropriate response is будь здоровий (BООD’ zdoh-RO-vyy - to a male sneezer, familiar) or its variations: будь здорова (BООD’ zdoh-RO-va - to a female sneezer, familiar), будьте здорові (BООD’-te zdoh-RO-vee - to a male or a female sneezer, formal), which means “be healthy”. For the sneezer it is polite to reply дякую (DIA-koo-you) meaning “thank you”.
In Urdu, the response is traditionally Al-hum-do-lillah, i.e. “All praise is for Allah (God)”.
In Uzbek, the response is Sog-buling, i.e. “Be healthy.”
In Vietnamese, the response is traditionally Sống lâu, i.e. “Live long” which, like “Bless You”, is an abbreviation of “Wish you a long life” or Lạy Mụ /layh-moo/, from the culture of Middle Vietnam, meaning “Mother Nature blesses you”. A different response if the one who sneeze is a small child is “Cơm muối”, which means “Rice and salt”.
In Yiddish, one says זײַ געזונט (pronounced zay gezunt; meaning “be healthy”) after one sneeze; after subsequent sneezes, צו געזונט (pronounced tzu gezunt) is said. Another response among Yiddish and Hebrew speaking Jews isאסותא (pronounced asuse; an Aramaic word meaning health). In another Jewish custom, a person responds to his or her own sneeze with חיים (pronounced chaim; a Hebrew word meaning life). (Pirkei D’ Reb Eliezer, an apocryphal Talmudic source)
[Source: Wikipedia - Responses to Sneezing]
NB: As this list was harvested from Wikipedia (and not verified elsewhere), the information may not be 100% accurate.
[Daniel Hughes]

RESPONSES TO SNEEZING:

In non-English-speaking cultures, words referencing good health or a long life are often used instead of “bless you”, though some also use references to God.

  • In Albanian, one says Shëndet (shuhn-det), to which typical responses are Faleminderit, meaning “Thank you”, or Shëndet paç, meaning literally “May you have health”.
  • In American Sign Language, native Deaf users typically do not respond to sneezes, but a hearing user may use the ASL words for “BLESS YOU”.
  • In Amharic, ይማርሽ (yimarish) for female or ይማርህ (yimarih) for male is said, meaning “may God forgive you”. The person who sneezed then responds by saying ያኑሪሽ (yanurish) for female or ያኑርህ (yanurih) for male, meaning “may you live for long”.
  • In Afrikaans, “Gesondheid” ([to your] “Health”) is said after a sneeze.
  • In Arabic, a response is صحة (Sahha), meaning “health” The response is either thank you شكراً (Shukran) or تسلم (Tislam/Taslam) which means “may you be kept safe”. Another typical interaction (from Islam’s teachings) is for the sneezer to say Alhamdo lel lah/Alhamdulillah i.e. “All praise is for Allah (God)”, after which a responder would say, يرحمكم الله (yarhamkom Allah) (God have mercy on you) and the answer is يهديكم الله و يصلح بالكم (Yahdeekom Allah wa yousleh balakom) (God guide you and make you right).
  • In Armenian, one says առողջություն (aroghjootyoon), which means “health”.
  • In Assamese, when someone sneezes, a person says মঙ্গল হওক (môngôl hôwk) to him, which means “May good happen”.
  • In Azeri, sneezing is usually followed by the response Sağlam ol, which means “be healthy”. Sometimes, Afiat is used, similar to the Persian response.
  • In Belarusian the response is будзь здаровы / будзь здароў (Budz zdarovy / budz zdarou) directed to a male person and будзь здаровая (Budz zdarovaja) for a female. The answer is дзякуй (dziakuj, thank you)
  • In Bosnian, one says Nazdravlje, meaning “To your good health”. The person who sneezed usually responds with Hvala, meaning “Thank you”.
  • In Bulgarian, one says Наздраве (Nazdrave), which means “[to your] health” or “cheers”. The person who has sneezed can then say Благодаря (Blagodarya), which means “Thank you”.
  • In Catalan, one says Jesús or Salut. The person who has sneezed would then reply Gràcies for thank you.
  • In Cantonese, one says “大吉利事”, which literally means “a great fortunate occurrence”.
  • In Chechen, the response is Dukha vehil (to man) or Dukha yehil (to woman), which means “live for a long time”.
  • In Chinese, one may say 一百岁 (yì bǎi suì) (Mandarin) which means (may you) live a hundred years. You might also say 长命百岁 (chánɡ mìnɡ bǎi suì) (Mandarin) which may you live to 100 years. However others may frequently not comment on the sneeze; whereas the polite sneezer might want to follow up a sneeze with 不好意思 (bù hǎo yì si) (Mandarin) or 唔好意思 (Cantonese), meaning “excuse me” or “sorry”.
  • In CroatianNa zdravlje (almost always pronounced nazdravlje) ([to your] “Health”) is said after a sneeze. For sneezer it is polite to reply Hvala meaning “thank you.”
  • In Czech, one says Pozdrav Pánbůh, meaning in colloquial Czech “Bless God” or “Greet God”, or Na zdraví, which means “To your health” and can be followed by the response Ať slouží (“May it last”). It is also less common to say Je to pravda (“It is true”).
  • In Danish, Prosit (“to [your] health”) is said after a sneeze. The polite response is “tak” (“thank you”).
  • In Dutch, one usually says gezondheid (literally translated as “health”), to which the person who sneezed will respond with dank u (wel) (thank you, formal) or dank je (wel) (thank you, informal). If the same person sneezes thrice, an informal comment would be (Drie keer) morgen mooi weer (which means “(Three times) the weather [will be] nice tomorrow”). This response can be made by both sneezer and non-sneezer.
  • In English, the usual response is (God) bless you or less commonly Gesundheit (from German, meaning good health).
  • In Esperanto, the usual response is Sanon (meaning “health”)
  • In Estonian, the usual response is Terviseks (meaning “For your health”)
  • In Finnish the usual response is Terveydeksi (meaning “For health”)
  • In French the usual response is à tes / vos souhaits which means “to your wishes”. If the same person sneezes again, one sometimes says à tes / vos amours, which means “to your loves.” If the same person sneezes a third time, then he/she responds to the original greeter saying et que les tiens / vôtres durent toujours, which means “and may yours last forever.” A more archaïc response would be Dieu te/vous bénisse (“God bless you”). Santé(meaning “health”) is a common response in some French-speaking countries, including Switzerland.
  • In Georgian, “ჯანმრთელობა” (“Health”) is said after a sneeze. Other responses include “Million dollars”, referencing the belief that one loses money while sneezing. Some sneezers respond with “Half!” (as in, a loss of only half a million dollars).
  • In GermanGesundheit (“health”) is said after a sneeze. The sneezer responds Danke (“thank you”). Sometimes other wishes are uttered at following sneezes, e.g. Zufriedenheit (“contentment”), Reichtum (“wealthiness”) or (humorously) Schönheit (“beauty”). The German word Gesundheit passed into local English usage in areas with substantial German-speaking populations. The expression is first widely attested in American English as of 1910, about the time when large numbers of Yiddish-speaking Ashkenazi Jews immigrated to the United States.
  • In Greekστην υγεία σου (steen eyia sue) is said meaning “to your health” or γείτσες (“healths”).
  • In Hebrewלבריאות (livri’oot or labri’oot, “to [your] health”) is said after a sneeze. The polite response is תודה (todah, “thank you”). (See entry under “Yiddish”, below, for other responses in Jewish culture/languages.)
  • In Hindi, there are multiple phrases, one says हरी ॐ, “’Hari Om" (the shortest mantra referring to the universality of Om) or सत्यमSatyam (sat’yam), meaning “truth” (also a shortened version of the mantra सत्यम शिवम् सुन्दरम, “Satyam Shivam Sundaram”, meaning “truth (is) God (is) beautiful”), or colloquially जीते रहो ”’Jite Raho’" (have a long life).
  • In Hungarian, one says Egészségedre!, which means “[to your] health”. The polite response is Köszönöm, meaning “Thank you”.
  • In Icelandic, one says Guð hjálpi þér! (“God help you!”). There is also an old custom to respond three times to three sneezes like so: Guð hjálpi þér (“God help you”), styrki þig (“strengthen you”), og styðji (“and support”). This can be shortened to Hjálpi þér (“Bless you / Help you”).
  • In Indonesia the sneezer will utter Alhamdulilah meaning God bless
  • In Irish, one says "Dia linn" or "Dia leat" (“God be with us”). Also “deiseal”, a deprecation meaning “may it go right”. The sneezer could say gabh mo leithscéal meaning “excuse me.”
  • In Italian, one says Salute! meaning “[to your] health”
  • In Japanese, generally, nothing is said. However, one who sneezes could say すみません (sumimasen, sorry) or 失礼しました (shitsurei shimashita, excuse me) following a sneeze. A Japanese superstition says that if one sneezes, they are being talked about by someone, somewhere (like the American warm ears superstition).
  • In Kazakh, one can say Сау Болыңыз (Saw Bolıñız) meaning “be healthy”.
  • In Khmer, one says Baoi.
  • In Kirundi, one says Kira, meaning “be healthy”, and the sneezer then says Twese, meaning “us all”
  • In Kurdish,the response is kher be inshalla, which means it will be a good thing God willing. Many times when one sneezes they say the thing they are about to do will not happen. So when the person sneezes they say kher bewhich means a good sign hopefully.
  • In Kyrgyz, one says Акчуч! [aqˈt͡ʃut͡ʃ] (which may be based on an onomatopœia of the sound of a sneeze, like English “atchoo” discussed above), to which one may respond Ракмат!, meaning “thank you”, if the person who said “акчуч” is liked.
  • In Ladino language, one says “Vivas,” which means “may you live.” After a second sneeze, one says “Crescas,” which means “may you grow.”
  • In Latgalian, one says Veseleibā, which means “to your health”. And the person who sneezes answers Paļdis, which translates as “Thank you”.
  • In Latvian, one says Uz veselību, which means “to your health”.
  • In Lithuanian, one says Į sveikatą, which means “to your health”. And the person who sneezes answers Ačiū, which translates as “Thank you”.
  • In Lojban, there is no set phrase. One of the more common ones are “kanro .a’o” (kanro aho) where “kanro” means “health” and “.a’o” is an attitudinal indicating it is said with hope. Another one is “.a’o do kanro” (aho do kanro), which means “[said with hope] Be healthy.”
  • In Luganda, one would say Bbuka,meaning “recover”.
  • In Macedonian, one says На здравје(na zdravje), meaning “[To Your] Health”. The person who sneezes usually says Здравје да имаш (zdravje da imash) which means “Have Health [yourself]”, or just saysБлагодарам(blagodaram) “Thank You” or Фала(fala) “Thanks”.
  • In Malayalam, there is no commonly or widely used phrase in response to a sneeze. However, references to God (such as ഹരി) or a variation of the term is used, especially when a child sneezes.
  • In Maltese, one says Evviva, which comes from the Italian “may he/she live” or “long live…”.
  • In Mongolian, one says Бурхан өршөө(Burkhan örshöö), which means “May god forgive you.”
  • In Persian, if the sneeze is especially dramatic, Afiat Bahsheh (عافیت باشه) is said, “[May] Cleanliness/Purity be bestowed [upon you]”.
  • In Nepali, one says ʼचिरन्जिभी (chiranjivī), meaning “may you live long.”
  • In Norwegian, Prosit (“to [your] health”) is said after a sneeze. The polite response is “takk” (“thank you”).
  • In PolishNa zdrowie ([to your] “Health” – meaning “may you get healthier”).
  • In Portuguese one says Santinho (“Little Saint”), Saúde (“[To your] Health”), [que] Deus te salve (“[may] God save you”), Viva (the closest would be “long life [to you]”), or [que] Deus te abafe (may God put a cover/blanket over you).
  • In Brazilian Portuguese one says Saúde, which means “[To your] Health”.
  • In Punjabi one says ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂ (Waheguru), which means “Glorious Lord”.
  • In Romanian, one says Sănătate (“[To your] Health”) or Noroc (“[To your] Luck”).
  • In Russian the response is будь здоров (bood’ zdorov, be healthy) directed to a male person and будь здорова (bood’ zdorova) to a female. The answer is спасибо (spasibo, thank you)
  • In Scandinavia, i.e., NorwaySweden and Denmark, one says Prosit, from the Latin meaning “to your benefit”. Originally used when toasting, today it is used only when someone sneezes.
  • In SerbianNa zdravlje (almost always pronounced nazdravlje) ([to your] “Health”) is said after a sneeze. For the sneezer, it is polite to reply Hvala meaning “Thank you.” Less frequent, but also a common response is Istina, meaning “it is true”.
  • In SlovakNa zdravie ([to your] “Health”) is said after a sneeze. For the sneezer, it is polite to reply Ďakujem meaning “Thank You.”
  • In SlovenianNa zdravje (almost always pronounced nazdravje) ([to your] “Health”) is a response to someone’s sneeze. For the sneezer, it is polite to reply Hvala meaning “Thank You.” Nowadays old-fashioned response to a sneeze would be Bog pomagaj, meaning “God help [to you]”.
  • In Spanish, one says Salud, which means “[to your] health” and Jesús (in Spain) referring to Christ (similarly to God bless you in English). If a person sneezes more than once, after the first sneeze one still says Salud. After the second sneeze one may say Dinero (meaning “money”), and after the third sneeze one may say Amor (meaning “love”).
  • In Swedish the most common response to someone sneezing is prosit to which the sneezer responds tack (thank you).
  • In Tamil, most sneezes are greeted with ஆயுசு நூறு (aayusu nooru, [aːjʉsʉ nuːɾʉ]), meaning ” may you live for a hundred years”
  • In Telugu, the phrase is Chiranjeevi Bhava, which translates to “(May you be blessed with a) Life without death”. Another widely used response is దీర్ఘాయుష్మాన్ భవ, which translates to ‘May you live long’.
  • In Turkish, a sneezer is always told to Çok Yaşa, i.e. “Live Long”, which in turn receives a response of either Sen De Gör (“[and I hope that] you see it”) or Hep Beraber (“all together”). This is to indicate the sneezer’s wish that the person wishing them a long life also has a long life so they can “live long” “all together”. In more polite circles, one might say Güzel Yaşayın, i.e. “[May You] Live Beautifully”, which may be countered with a Siz de Görün (“[And may You] witness it”).
  • In Ukrainian, the appropriate response is будь здоровий (BООD’ zdoh-RO-vyy - to a male sneezer, familiar) or its variations: будь здорова (BООD’ zdoh-RO-va - to a female sneezer, familiar), будьте здорові (BООD’-te zdoh-RO-vee - to a male or a female sneezer, formal), which means “be healthy”. For the sneezer it is polite to reply дякую (DIA-koo-you) meaning “thank you”.
  • In Urdu, the response is traditionally Al-hum-do-lillah, i.e. “All praise is for Allah (God)”.
  • In Uzbek, the response is Sog-buling, i.e. “Be healthy.”
  • In Vietnamese, the response is traditionally Sống lâu, i.e. “Live long” which, like “Bless You”, is an abbreviation of “Wish you a long life” or Lạy Mụ /layh-moo/, from the culture of Middle Vietnam, meaning “Mother Nature blesses you”. A different response if the one who sneeze is a small child is “Cơm muối”, which means “Rice and salt”.
  • In Yiddish, one says זײַ געזונט (pronounced zay gezunt; meaning “be healthy”) after one sneeze; after subsequent sneezes, צו געזונט (pronounced tzu gezunt) is said. Another response among Yiddish and Hebrew speaking Jews isאסותא (pronounced asuse; an Aramaic word meaning health). In another Jewish custom, a person responds to his or her own sneeze with חיים (pronounced chaim; a Hebrew word meaning life). (Pirkei D’ Reb Eliezer, an apocryphal Talmudic source)

[Source: Wikipedia - Responses to Sneezing]

NB: As this list was harvested from Wikipedia (and not verified elsewhere), the information may not be 100% accurate.

[Daniel Hughes]

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